Historical Aircraft

Air Force (Canada) History

 

HEADQUARTERS
Air Force Headquarters
Badge In front of a circle inscribed with the motto PER ARDUA AD ASTRA
and ensigned with the Imperial
Crown, an eagle volant affronte the
head to the sinister. Beneath the
whole upon a scroll the words “Royal
Canadian Air Force”
Motto Per ardua ad astra (Through
adversity to the stars)
Authority King George VI, January
1943
The badge for the RCAF was based
on that of the RAF and is very
similar except for the head of the eagle to the sinister and a scroll below with the words ‘Royal Canadian Air Force’.
The motto PER ARDUA AD ASTRA can be assigned to no
author but is said to be derived from a line of Seneca AD ASTRA NULLA EST MOLLIS A TERRA VIA (There is no easy road from earth to heaven). The motto has been given several
similar translations, the most preferable being “THROUGH ADVERSITY TO THE STARS” as it leaves one to imagine in
English that the “stars” may stand for “glory,” “heights,” or “success.”
Formed as Canadian Air Force Headquarters at Ottawa,
Ontario on 18 February 1920; redesignated Royal Canadian Air Force Headquarters on 1 April 1924; redesignated Air Force Headquarters 31 August 1939; ceased to exist on the formation of Canadian Forces Headquarters on 1 August
1964.1
Directors, CAF
AIC A.K. Tylee, OBE 17 May 20 -21 Mar 21.
W/C R.F. Redpath 22 Mar 21 -12 Jul 21.
WIC J.S. Scott, MC. AFC 13 Jul 21 -30 Jun 22.
W!C J.L. Gordon, DFC 1 Jul 22 -31 Mar 24.
Directors, RCAF
W/C W.G. Barker, VC, DSO, MC 1 Apr 24 -18 May 24. GIC J.S. Scott, MC, AFC 19 May 24 -14 Feb 28.
WIC L.S. Breadner, DSC 15 Feb 28 -29 Apr 32.
SIL A.A.L. Cuffe 30 Apr 32 -31 Oct 32.
Senior Air Officers
GIC J.L. Gordon, DFC 1 Nov 32 -31 May 33.

Chiefs of the Air Staf f2
A/VIM G.M. Croil, AFC 15 Dec 38 -28 May 40.
AIM L.S. Breadner, CB, DSC 29 May 40 -31 Dec 43.
AIM R. Leckie, CB, DSO, DSC, DFC 1 Jan 44 –
31 Aug 47.
AIM W.A. Curtis, CB, CBE, DSC, ED 1 Sep 47 -31 Jan 53.
AIM C.R. Siemon, CB, CBE, CD 1 Feb 53 -31 Aug 57.
AIM H. Campbell, CBE, CD 1 Sep 57 -14 Sep 62.
AIM C.R. Dunlap, CBE, CD 15 Sep 62 -31 Jul 64.
1
The RCAF itself continued to exist until 1 February 1968 when the Cana­dian Forces Reorganization Act came into effect.
‘Responsible directly to the Minister of National Defence -not, as in the case of the Senior Air Officer. through the Chief of the General Staff
(Army).
RCAF Overseas Headquarters

Badge In front of a hurt an eagle
volant carrying in the claw a sprig of
maple
Motto Omni caelo (In every sky)
Authority King George VI, June 1944
The hurt, or blue disk, represents the
sea or sky over which the eagle is
carrying the maple of Canada.
Formed at London, England on 1
January 1940, the headquarters exer­
cised administrative control over all
RCAF personnel and units overseas
and acted on behalf of the RCAF on
all matters pertaining to their employment; disbanded on 22 July 1946.
Commanders’
W/C F.V. Heakes 1 Jan 40 -6 Mar 40.
AIC G.V. Walsh, MBE 7 Mar 40 -15 Oct 40.
A/C L.F. Stevenson 16 Oct 40 -23 Nov 41.
AIM H. Edwards, CB 24 Nov 41 -31 Dec 43.
AIM L.S. Breadner, CB, DSC 1 Jan 44 -31 Mar 45 ret. AIM G.O. Johnson, CB, MC 1 Apr 45 -22 Jul 46.

COMMANDS
Air Defence Command

Badge In front of two rays of light­
ning a long-tailed jaeger volant
Motto Detegere et des true re (To
detect and to destroy)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II,
November 1954
The jaeger is indicative of defending
aircraft and the rays of lightnng
represent radar and other electronics
of the Command.
Formed as No. 1 Air Defence Group
at Air Force Headquarters,
Ottawa, Ontario on 1 December 1948; moved to
St Hubert, Quebec on 1 November 1949 and declared operational on the 23rd; elevated to Air Defence Command on 1 June 1951; integrated into North American Air Defence (NORAD) Command on 12 September 1957; moved to North Bay, Ontario in August 1966; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 February 1968. Commanders
No. 1 Air Defence Group:
GIC W.R. MacBrien, OBE, CD 1 Dec 48 – 31 May 51.
Air Defence Command:
A/VIM C.R. Dunlap, CBE, CD 1 Jun 51 – 31 Aug 51.
A/VIM A.L James, CBE, CD 1 Sep 51 – 31 Aug 54.
A/VIM LE. Wray, OBE, AFC, CD 17 Jan 55 – 21 Aug 58. A/VIM W.R. MacBrien, OBE, CD 22 Aug 58 – 31 Aug 62. A/VIM M.M. Hendrick, OBE, CD 1 Sep 62 – 30 Aug 64 ret.
A/VIM M.D. Lister, CD 31 Aug 64 – 31 Mar 66.
A/VIM M.E. Pollard, DSO, DFC, AFC, CD 1 Apr 66 – 31 Jan 68.

Air Materiel Command
Badge In front of a Terrestrial Globe supported by a gauntleted hand an Astral Crown
Motto Sustinemus (We support) Authority Queen Elizabeth II, Oc­tober 1964
The Terrestrial Globe supported by a gauntleted hand is to represent the support given by the Command to the RCAF across the world. The Astral Crown is to indicate Com­mand status.

Formed as Maintenance Command at Uplands (Ottawa), Ontario on 1 October 1945; moved to No. 8 Temporary Building, Ottawa, Ontario on 15 March 1947; moved to Rockcliffe (Ottawa), Ontario and renamed Air Materiel Command on 1 April 1949; disbanded on 1 August 1965 on the formation of the Canadian Forces Materiel Com­mand.
Commanders
A/VIM R.E. McBurney, CBE 1 Oct 45 – 23 Jun 46.
AIC F.R. Miller, CBE 24 Jun 46 – 4 Aug 48.
A/VIM R.E. McBumey, CBE 5 Aug 48 – 31 Dec 51 ret. A/VIM H.B. Godwin, CBE, CD 1 Jan 52 – 19 Jul 55.
A/VIM J.L Plant, CBE, AFC, CD 20 Jul 55 – 31 Aug 56 ret.
A/VIM R.C. Ripley, OBE, CD 1 Sep 56 – 1 Mar 57 KIFA. A/V /M C.A. Cook, OBE, CD 2 Mar 57 – 24 Jul 58 died. A/VIM C.L Annis, OBE, CD 1 Jan 59 – 9 Sep 62.
A/VIM J.B. Millward, DFC, CD 10 Sep 62 – 1 Aug 65.
Air Training Command
Formed as Training Group at Camp Borden, Ontario on 1 April 1935; moved to Trenton, Ontario on 1 September 1937; elevated to Air Training Command on 15 September 1938; moved to Toronto, Ontario on 1 October 1938; disbanded on 1 January 1940 on the formation of No. 1 Training Command of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.
Commanders
GIC A.E. Godfrey, MC, AFC, VD 17 Oct 38 – 15 Dec 38. AIC A.AL Cuffe 16 Dec 38 – 1 Jan 40.

Air Transport Command
Badge An albatross flying in front of a Terrestrial Globe
Motto Versatile and ready
Authority Queen Elizabeth II,
December 1959
To symbolize the widespread opera­tions of the Command over land and sea.
Formed within Air Force Head­
quarters as the Directorate of Air
Transport Command at Ottawa, On­tario on S August 1943; redesignated No. 9 (Transport) Group and moved

to Rockcliffe (Ottawa), Ontario on S February 1945 as an autonomous headquarters; elevated to Air Transport Com­mand on 1 April 1948; moved to Lachine (Montreal),
Quebec on 9 August 1951, then to Trenton, Ontario on 1 September 1959; integrated into the Canadian Armed
Forces on 1 February 1968.
Commanders
Directorate of Air Transport Command:
GIC Z.L. Leigh, OBE S Aug 43 – 4 Feb 45.
No. 9 (Transport) Group:
GIC Z.L. Leigh, OBE 5 Feb 45 – 31 May 45.
AIC J.L. Plant, CBE 1 Jun 45 – 4 Feb 46.
AIC L.E. Wray, OBE, AFC 5 Feb 46 – 31 Mar 48.
Air Transport Command:
NC L.E. Wray, OBE, AFC 1 Apr 48 – 15 Aug 48.
AIC A.O. Ross, GC, CBE, CD 16 Aug 48 – 3 Aug 51.
NC R.C. Ripley, OBE, CD 4 Aug 51 – 17 Nov 53.
AIC H.M. Carscallen, DFC, CD 26 Jul 54 – s Aug 56.
NC F.S. Carpenter, AFC, CD 6 Aug 56 – 26 Jun 61.
NC R.J. Lane, DSO, DFC and Bar, CD 27 Jun 61 –
27 Dec 65.
NC G.G. Diamond, AFC, CD 28 Dec 61 – 14 Apr 67 ret. AIC A.C. Hull, DFC, CD 15 Apr 67 – 31 Jan 68.

Central Air Command
Formed at Trenton, Ontario on 1 March 1947 on the
disbandment of No. 1 Air Command; was one of the two geographical air commands of the peacetime establishment, and controlled No. 10 Group (formerly Eastern Air Com­mand) at Halifax, Nova Scotia; disbanded on 1 April 1949 on the formation of Training Command.
Commanders
NV/M E.E. Middleton, CBE 1 Mar 47 – 1 Apr 49.
Eastern Air Command
Formed at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 15 November 1938;
during the Second World War, it operated both as a com­mand and as an operational group headquarters, as well as controlling No. 1 Group at St. John’s, Newfoundland and No. S (Gulf) Group at Gaspe, Quebec; it also administered No. 12 (Operational Training) Group at Halifax; disbanded on 1 March 1947 on the formation of No. 10 Group of
Central Air Command.
Commanders
NVIM N.R. Anderson 17 Dec 38 – 17 Feb 42.
A/VIM A.A.L. Cuffe 18 Feb 42 – 13 Jan 43.
A/VIM G.O. Johnson, CB, MC 14 Jan 43 – 19 Mar 45.
A/VIM A.L. Morfee, CB, CBE 20 Mar 45 – 1 Mar 47.
Maritime Air Command

Badge Two Osprey heads conjoined
and issuant from an Astral Crown
Motto Over the seas
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, June
1964
The Osprey like the Command ranges
over a wide area including both
coasts of Canada. The Osprey is a
powerful bird with keen eyesight. It
seldom misses its prey. The two
heads shown issuant from an Astral
Crown indicates watchfulness over
the coastal areas. The Astral Crown
indicates Command status. The motto indicates the area of operation.
Formed at Halifax, Nova Scotia as No. 10 Group of Cen­tral Air Command on 1 March 1947 on the disbandment of Eastern Air Command; redesignated Maritime Group on 1 April 1949 and became autonomous on 15 January 1951; elevated to Maritime Air Command on 1 June 1953;
disbanded on 16 January 1966 on the formation of Cana­dian Forces Maritime Command.
Commanders
No. 10 Group, Central Air Command:
NC F.G. Wait, CBE 31 May 47 – 31 Mar 49.
Maritime Group:
AIC F.G. Wait, CBE 1 Apr 49 – 12 Dec 49.
AIC R.C. Gordon, CBE, CD 24 Jan SO – 8 Aug 51.
AIC A.O. Ross, GC, CBE, CD 9 Aug 51 – 31 May 53.
Maritime Air Command;
NC A.O. Ross, GC, CBE, CD 1 Jun 53 – 6 Aug 54.

AIC W.I. Clements, OBE, CD 11 Jul 58 – 31 Jul 63 ret. NC F.S. Carpenter, AFC, CD 1 Aug 63 -30 Aug 65. NC R.A. Gordon, DSC, DFC, CD 13 Sep 65 – 16 Jan 66.
Maintenance Command
see Air Materiel Command
North West Air Command
Formed as the North West Staging Route at Edmonton, Alberta on 15 October 1942 under No. 4 Training Com­mand of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan; redesignated No. 2 Wing of Western Air Command on 1 January 1944; elevated to Command status and renamed North West Air Command on 1 June 1944; retained in the peacetime organization as one of the two geographical air commands, and controlled No. 11 Group at Winnipeg, Manitoba and No. 12 Group at Vancouver, British Colum­bia; was disbanded on 1 August 1951, when it was ab­sorbed by Tactical Group (formerly No. 11 Group) to form Tactical Air Group (later Tactical Air Command). Commanders
North West Staging Route:
W!C C.M.G. Farrell, DFC 15 Oct 42 -31 Dec 42.
W/C W.J. McFarlane, 1 Jan 43 -31 Dec 43.
GIC V.H. Petriarche, AFC 1 Jan 44 -25 Feb 44.
No. 2 Wing:
G/C V.H. Petriarche, AFC 26 Feb 44 -31 Mar 44.
North West Air Command:
A/VIM T.A. Lawrence, CB 1 Jun 44 -15 Sep 46.
AIC R.C. Gordon, CBE 16 Sep 46 -12 Mar 47.
A/VIM K.M. Guthrie, CB, CBE 13 Mar 47 – 31 Mar 49 ret. A/VIM H.L. Campbell, CBE 1 Apr 49 – 3 Nov 49.
A/VIM C.R. Dunlap, CBE, CD 4 Nov 49 – 30 May 51. NC W.E. Bennett, CD 31 May 51 -1 Aug 51.
Tactical Air Command
Badge A demi-polar bear issuant from
an Astral Crown.
Motto Custos Borealis (Guardians of
the North)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, Octo­
ber 1954
The Astral Crown denotes a Com­
mand and the demi-polar bear is sug­
gestive of its operational role within
the northern boundaries of Canada.
Formed as No. 11 Group of North
West Air Command at Winnipeg,
Manitoba on 1 March 1947; redesig-
nated Tactical Group on 1 April 1949; became autonomous on 15 January 1951; moved to Edmonton, Alberta and merged with North West Air Command on 1 August 1951 to form Tactical Air Group; elevated to Tactical Air Com­mand on 1 June 1953; disbanded on 1 January 1959. Commanders
No. 11 Group (later Tactical Group):
A/C M. Costello, CBE, CD 8 Mar 47 – 23 May 51. Tactical Air Group:
NC W.E. Bennett, CD 1 Aug 51 – 27 Nov 51.

AIC J.G. Kerr, CBE, AFC, CD 28 Feb 52 -17 Dec 52. NC S.W. Coleman, CD 18 Dec 52 – 31 May 53. Tactical Air Command:
AIC S.W. Coleman, CD 1 Jun 53 -8 Nov 55.
GIC H.G. Richards, OBE, CD 20 Nov 55 -15 Nov 58.
Training Command

Badge Issuant from an Astral Crown
two torches in saltire
Motto Exercendum usque ad op­
timum (One must train up to the
highest standard)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, July
1962
The torches are introduced to suggest
learning and the Astral Crown leader­
ship and success.
Formed at Trenton, Ontario on 1
April 1949 on the disbandment of
Central Air Command; controlled
No. 14 (Training) Group at Winnipeg, Manitoba; moved to Winnipeg on 11 September 1958 and absorbed No. 14 Group; disbanded on 15 January 1966 on the formation of Canadian Forces Training Command.
Commanders
A/VIM E.E. Middleton, CBE 1 Apr 49 – 31 Aug 49 ret. NV/M C.R. Siemon, CB, CBE, CD 1 Sep 49 -11 Jan 53. NV!M J.G. Kerr, CBE, AFC, CD 12 Jan 53 – 31 Aug 55. A/VIM J.G. Bryans, CBE, CD 1 Sep 55 -18 Nov 60 ret. A/VIM H.M. Carscallen, DFC, CD 19 Nov 60 -25 Aug 63 ret.
NV/M C.H. Greenway, OBE, CD 26 Aug 63 – 26 Sep 65. AIC C.W. Burgess, DFC, CD 27 Sep 65 -15 Jan 66.
Western Air Command
Formed at Vancouver, British Columbia on 1 March 1938; moved to Victoria, British Columbia on 25 November 1939 and returned to Vancouver on 1 January 1943; during the Second World War, operated as both a command and an operational group headquarters, as well as controlling No. 4 Group at Prince Rupert, British Columbia and, for a short time, No. 2 Group at Victoria; disbanded on 1 March 1947 on the formation of No. 12 Group of North West Air Command.
Commanders
AIC G.O. Johnson, MC 5 Apr 38 -20 Oct 39.
AIC A.E. Godfrey, MC, AFC 21 Oct 39 – 31 Dec 41. NV/M L.F. Stevenson, CB 1 Jan 42 -9 Jun 44.
A/VIM F.V. Heakes, CB 10 Jun 44 – 13 Feb 46 ret.
NV/M J.L. Plant, CBE, AFC 14 Feb 46 – 1 Mar 47.

No. 1 Air Command
Formed at Trenton, Ontario on 15 January 1945 by the
merger of No. 1 and No. 3 Training Command of the
British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, as a temporary organization to cover the closing down of the BCA TP and the establishment of the peacetime command organization; disbanded on 1 March 1947 on the formation of Central Air Command.
Commanders
NV/MA. Raymond, CBE 15 Jan 45 -3 Jul 45 ret.
NV/M E.E. Middleton, CBE 4 Jul 45 -1 Mar 47.
No. 2 Air Command
Badge Between two wheat sheaves a
bison’s head caboshed
Motto Servituri patriae (To serve our
country)
Authority King George VI, May 1947
The badge is symbolic of the prairie
provinces over which units of this
Command operated.
Formed at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 1
December 1944 by the merger of No.
2 and No. 4 Training Command of
the British Commonwealth Air Train-
ing Plan as a temporary organization
to cover the closing down of the BCA TP and the establish­ment of the peacetime command organization; disbanded on 1 March 1947 on the formation of No. 11 Group of
North West Air Command.
Commanders
NV/M K.M. Guthrie, CB, CBE 1 Dec 44 -1 Mar 47.
AIR DIVISIONS
No. 1 Air Division Europe
Badge In front of four maple leaves
with stems joined to form a cross two
sabres in saltire
Motto Ad custodiendam Europam
(For the defence of Europe)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, June
1962
The Division’s four wings are
represented by the maple leaves and
the sabres are to signify the Division’s
fighting power and also have
reference to the Sabre aircraft with
which the wings of the unit were originally equipped.
Formally constituted at Paris, France on 1 October 1952 as an operational command of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization’s Allied Command Europe; moved to Metz, France on 13 April 1953, then to Lahr, Germany on 1 April 1967; integrated into Canadian Armed Forces on 1
February 1968.

AIC F.G. Wait 27 Mar 45 – 30 Jun 45.
Higher Formation and Group Location
Eastern Air Command:
St. John’s, Nfld., 10 Jul 41 – 30 Jun 45.
No. 1 Air Defence Group
see Air Defence Command
No. 1 Group (Auxiliary)
Montreal, Quebec
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Group Montreal on 15 January 1951; redesignated No. 1 Group (Reserve) on 1 June 1951, and No. 1 Group (Auxiliary) on 1 September; performed the functions of No. 11 (Operational) Wing (Auxiliary) and No. 12 (Technical Training) Wing (Auxiliary), both of which had been authorized but not formed; disbanded on 15 April 1957.
Commanders
GIC L.G.G.J. Archambault, AFC, CD 1 Feb 51 – 16 Aug 53.
GIC F.R.C. Carling-Kelly, AFC, CD 17 Aug 53 – 1 Sep 55. G/C J.A.D.B. Richer, DFC, CD 2 Sep 55 – 15 Mar 57. Higher Formation and Group Location
Air Defence Command:
Montreal, Que. 15 Jan 51 – 15 Apr 57.
No. 2 Group
Western Air Command
Formed at Victoria, British Columbia on 1 January 1943 as a temporary formation to cover the move of Western Air Command Headquarters from Victoria to Vancouver; disbanded on 15 March 1943.
Commanders
A/C E.L. McLeod 1 Jan 43 – 15 Mar 43.
Higher Formation and Group Location
Western Air Command:
Victoria, B.C. 1 Jan 43 – 15 Mar 43.
No. 2 Group (Auxiliary)
Toronto, Ontario
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Group Toronto on 15 January 1951; redesignated No. 2 Group (Reserve) on 1 August 1951, then No. 2 Group (Auxiliary) on 1 September; con­trolled No. 14 (Operational) Wing (Auxiliary) and No. 15 (Technical Training) Wing (Auxiliary); disbanded on 1 March 1957.
Commanders
GIC G.A. Hiltz, AFC, CD 22 Jan 51 – 17 Jan 53.
GIC V.H. Patriarche, OBE, AFC, ED 18 Jan 53 – 6 Sep 54. GIC Z.L. Leigh, OBE, ED 7 Sep 54 – 12 Feb 57.
Higher Formations and Group Location
Training Command,
Air Defence Command (1 Aug 51):
Toronto, Ont. 15 Jan 51 – 1 Mar 57.

No. 4 Group
Western Air Command
Formed at Prince Rupert, British Columbia on 16 June 1942 to provide administrative and operational control of RCAF units in northern British Columbia and the Yukon; dis­banded on 1 April 1944.
Commanders
GIC R.C. Gordon 16 Jun 42 – 11 Jun 43.
G/C R.H. Foss 12 Jun 43 – 1 Apr 44.
Higher Formation and Group Location
Western Air Command:
Prince Rupert, B.C. 16 Jun 42 – 1 Apr 44.
No. 5 (Gulf) Group
Eastern Air Command
Formed at Gaspe, Quebec on 1 May 1943 to integrate and control air operations over the Gulf of St. Lawrence during the shipping season; inactive from 15 November 1943 to 30 April 1944, with headquarters located at Eastern Air Com­mand Headquarters, Halifax, Nova Scotia; disbanded on 15 November 1944.
Commanders
GIC W.A. Orr, OBE 5 May 43 – 31 Oct 43.
W/C F.J. Ewart 1 Nov 43 – 15 Nov 44.
Higher Formation and Group Locations
Eastern Air Command:
Gaspe, Que. 1 May 43 – 14 Nov 43.
Halifax, N.S. (Group inactive) 15 Nov 43 – 30 Apr 44. Gaspe, Que. 1 May 44 – 15 Nov 44.
No. 6 (RCAF) Group
RAF Bomber Command

Badge A maple leaf superimposed on
a York rose
Motto Sollertia et ingenium (Initiative
and skill)
Authority King George VI, October
1946
The York rose symbolizes the associa­
tion with Yorkshire where the group
was formed.
Formed at Linton-on-Ouse, York­
shire, England on 25 October 1942
and moved to permanent quarters at
Allerton Park, east of Knares-
borough, on 6 December; declared operational at 0001 hours on 1 January 1943; transferred to RCAF s Eastern Air Command on 14 July 1945 to reorganize and train for service in the Pacific as part of RAF “Tiger Force”; disbanded on 1 September 1945.
Commanders
A/VIM G.E. Brookes, OBE 25 Oct 42 – 28 Feb 44.
A/V /M C.M. McEwen, CB, MC, DFC 29 Feb 44 –
13 Jul 45.
Main Headquarters (Halifax, N. S.):
AIC J.G. Kerr, AFC 14 Jul 45 – 1 Sep 45*.
Rear Headquarters (Allerton Park):
A/C J.L. Hurley 14 Jul 45 – 1 Sep 45.

Higher Formations and Group Locations
RAF Bomber Command:
Linton-on-Ouse, Yorks 25 Oct 42 – 5 Dec 42.
Allerton Park, Yorks 6 Dec 42 – 13 Jul 45.
(Rear Headquarters until 1 Sep 45)
RAF “Tiger Force”,
RCAF Eastern Air Command (for training):
Halifax, N.S. 14 Jul 45 – 1 Sep 45.
Operational History: First Mission 3/4 January 1943, 6 Wellingtons of No. 427 (B) Squadron laid mines off the Fri­sian Islands. First Bombing Mission 13/14 January 1943, 14 Wellingtons despatched to bomb Lorient, France; 11 bombed the primary target, 2 returned early, 1 failed to return. Maximum Mission 6/7 October 1944, 293 Lan­casters and Halifaxes despatched to bomb Dortmund, Ger­many; 273 bombed the primary target, 3 bombed the alter­native, 15 dropped no bombs, 2 failed to return. Last Mis­sion 25 April 1945, 102 Lancasters and 92 Halifaxes, with 160 aircraft from No. 4 Group, bombed gun positions on the Island of Wangerooge; 1 Lancaster and 2 Halifaxes failed to return. Summary Sorties: 40,822. Operational Fly­ing Hours: 271,981. Bombs dropped: 126,122 tons
(including mines). Victories; 116 aircraft destroyed, 24 probably destroyed, 92 damaged. Casualties: 814 aircraft; 3500-plus aircrew killed or presumed dead.

Although the headquarters was being set up at Halifax, AIC Kerr operated from Ottawa during this period. 450 No. 6 (RCAF) Group Headquarters at Allerton Park, Yorks., England. Operations were planned at Aller­ton Hall from 1 January 1943.
No. 9 (Transport) Group
see Air Transport Command
No. 10 Group
see Maritime Air Command
No. 11 Group

No. 12 Group
see No. 5 Air Division
No. 12 (Operational Training) Group
Eastern Air Command
Formed at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 22 July 1942 to ad­minister and control operational training units in Eastern Air Command; disbanded on 14 January 1945. Commanders
NC L.L. Maclean 22 Jul 42 – 4 May 43.
AIC W.J. Seward, CBE 5 May 43 – 30 Sep 44.
CIC G.T. Richardson 1 Oct 44 – 14 Jan 45.
Higher Formation and Group Location
Eastern Air Command:
Halifax, N.S. 22 Jul 42 – 14 Jan 45.
No. 14 (Training) Group
Training Command
Formed at Winnipeg, Manitoba on 1 August 1951 to ad­minister and control training facilities reactivated in the Prairie Provinces to train North Atlantic Treaty Organiza­tion aircrew; absorbed into Training Command Head­quarters when the latter moved to Winnipeg on 11 September 1959.
Commanders
AIC J.C. Bryans, CBE, CD 1 Aug 51 – 31 Aug 55.
NC H.H.C. Rutledge, OBE, CD 1 Sep 55 – 11 Sep 59. Higher Formation and Group Location
Training Command :
Winnipeg, Man. 1 Aug 51 – 11 Sep 59.
SECTORS
No. 17 Sector
RAF Second Tactical Air Force
Formed as No. 17 (Fighter) Wing at Headcorn, Kent, England on 4 July 1943 to administer and control No. 126 and No. 127 Airfield, plus No. 144 Airfield as of 21 April 1944; redesignated No. 17 Sector at Kenley, Surrey on 15 May 1944 when airfields became wings; disbanded at Crepon, France on 13 July 1944 on the reorganization of Second Tactical Air Force.
Commanders
G/C W.R. MacBrien 4 Jul 43 – 13 Jul 44.
Higher Formations and Sector Locations
Tactical Air Force Fighter Command, renamed
Second Tactical Air Force (15 Nov 43):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
Headcorn, Kent 4 Jul 43 – 13 Oct 43.
Kenley, Surrey 14 Oct 43 – 5 Jun 44.
En route to Europe, 6 Jun 44 – 13 Jun 44.
B,(Base) 2 Crepon, Fr. 14 Jun 44 -13 Jul 44.

No. 22 Sector
RAF Second Tactical Air Force
Formed as No. 22 (Fighter) Wing at Ayr, Scotland on 9 January 1944 to administer and control No. 143 and No. 144 Airfield; reorganized as a Fighter Bomber formation on 16 April 1944, when it absorbed No. 16 (RAF) Wing along with No. 121 and No. 124 (RAF) Airfield, (No. 144 Airfield was transferred to No. 17 (Fighter) Wing); redesignated No. 22 Sector at Hurn, Hampshire, England on 15 May 1944 when airfields became wings; disbanded at Camilly, France on 13 July 1944 on the reorganization of Second Tactical Air Force.
Commanders
GIC P.Y. Davoud, DSO, DFC 9 Jan 44 – 13 Jul 44.
Higher Formations and Sector Locations
Air Defence Great Britain:
No. 12 Group,
Ayr, Scot. 9 Jan 44 – 20 Feb 44.
Digby, Lines. 21 Feb 44 – 16 Mar 44.
Hurn, Hants. 17 Mar 44.
Second Tactical Air Force:
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
Hurn, Hants. 18 Mar 44 – 25 Mar 44.
Westhampnett, Sussex 26 Mar 44 – 15 Apr 44.
Hurn, Hants. 16 Apr 44 – 5 Jun 44.
En route to Europe 6 Jun 44 – 15 Jun 44.
B.(Base) 5 Le Fresne, Fr. 16 Jun 44 – 13 Jul 44.
BASES
No. 61 (Training) Base
No. 6 (RCAF) Group
Formed as Topcliffe Operational Base with headquarters at Topcliffe, Yorkshire, England on 1 March 1943, controlling RCAF Stations T opcliffe, Dishforth and Dalton; redesignated No. 6 (RCAF) Group Training Base on 30 April 1943, then No. 61 (Training) Base on 16 September, when it added RCAF Station Wombleton; transferred to No. 7 (Training) Group and renumbered No. 76 (RCAF) Training Base on 9 November 1944; disbanded on 1 September 1945.
Commanders
NC C.M. McEwen, MC, DFC 5 Apr 43 – 25 Jun 43.
NC B.F. Johnson 26 Jun 43 – 16 Feb 44.
NC R.E. McBumey, AFC 17 Feb 44 – 15 May 44.
AIC F.G. Wait 16 May 44 – 7 Aug 44.
AIC J.L. Hurley 1 Sep 44 – 18 Sep 44.
NC F.R. Miller 19 Sep 44 – 12 Jan 45.
NC J.G. Kerr, AFC 13 Jan 45 – 30 May 45.
AIC N.W. Timmerman, DSO, DFC 1 Aug 45 – 1 Sep 45. Higher Formations and Base Location
Bomber Command:
No. 6 (RCAF) Group,
No. 7 (Training) Group (9 Nov 44),
Topcliffe, Yorks. 1 Mar 43 – 1 Sep 45.

No.62 “Beaver” (Operational) Base
No. 6 (RCAF) Group

Badge On a rock a beaver gnawing a
log
Motto Ad opus diligenter (To the
task with diligence)
Authority King George VI, September
1944
Formed as Linton-on-Ouse Opera­
tional Base with headquarters at
Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire, England
on 1 June 1943, controlling RCAF
Stations Linton-on-Ouse, East Moor
and Tholthorpe; redesignated No. 62
“Beaver” (Operational) Base on 6
October 1943; disbanded on 15 July 1945 when its units and establishment were transferred to RCAF Eastern Air Command as part of RAF ‘Tiger” Force for duty in the Pacific.
Commanders
AIC C.M. McEwen, MC, DFC 18 Jun 43 – 28 Feb 44. NC A.O. Ross, GC 29 Feb 44 – 27 Jun 44.
AIC J.E. Fauquier, DSO and 2 Bars, DFC 28 Jun 44 – 18 Sep 44.
NC J.L. Hurley 19 Sep 44 – 30 May 45.
AIC J.G. Kerr, AFC 31 May 45 – 15 Jul 45.
Higher Formation and Base Location
Bomber Command:
No. 6 (RCAF) Group,
Linton-on-Ouse, Yorks. 1 Jun 43 – 15 Jul 45.
No. 63 (Operational) Base
No. 6 (RCAF) Group
Formed with headquarters at Leeming, Yorkshire, England on 1 May 1944, controlling RCAF Stations Leeming and Skipton-on-Swale; disbanded on 31 August 1945. Commanders
AIC J.G. Bryans 1 May 44 – 12 Jan 45.
NC F.R. Miller 13 Jan 45 – 25 May 45.
AIC J.L. Hurley 30 May 45 – 13 Jul 45.
Higher Formation and Base Location
Bomber Command:
No. 6 (RCAF) Group,
Leeming, Yorks. 1 May 44 – 31 Aug 45.
No. 64 (Operational) Base
No. 6 (RCAF) Group
Formed with headquarters at Middleton St. George, Durham, England on 1 May 1944, controlling RCAF Sta­tions Middleton St. George and Croft; disbanded on 15 June 1945, when its units and establishment were transfer­red to RCAF Eastern Air Command as part of RAF ‘Tiger Force” for duty in the Pacific.
Commanders
AIC R.E. McBumey 1 May 44 – 28 Dec 44.
AIC C.R. Dunlap, CBE 22 Jan 45 – 24 Apr 45.
AIC H.B. Godwin 25 Apr 45 – 29 May 45.
AIC H.T. Miles 30 May 45 – 15 Jun 45.

Higher Formations and Base Location
Bomber Command:
No. 6 (RCAF) Group,
Middleton St. George, Durham 1 May 44 – 15 Jun 45.
WINGS
Canadian Digby Wing
RAF Fighter Command
Formed at Digby, Lincolnshire, England on 14 April 1941; inactive from 1 May 1942 to 18 April 1943; disbanded on 30 April 1944 when its squadrons were transferred to Se­cond Tactical Air Force.
Wing Commanders Flying
W/C G.R. McGregor, DSO, DFC 14 Apr 41 – 31 Aug 41. W/C H.P. Blatchford (Can/RAF), DFC 8 Sep 41 –
30 Apr 42.
Wing inactive
W/C L.S. Ford, DFC and Bar 19 Apr 43 – 4 Jun 43 KIA. W/C L.V. Chadburn, DSO and Bar, DFC 5 Jun 43 –
30 Dec 43.
W/C N.H. Bretz, DFC 31 Dec 43 – 30 Apr 44.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Fighter Command renamed,
Air Defence Great Britain (15 Nov 43):
No. 12 Group, Digby, Lines. (Satellite airfield at Wellingore) 14 Apr 41 – 30 Apr 42 and 19 Apr 43 –
30 Apr 44.
Operational History: First Mission 15 April 1941, 12 Hur­ricane I’s of No. 402 Squadron led by W/C McGregor, and supported by the Wittering Wing (Spitfires of No. 65 and No. 266 Squadron RAF) – fighter sweep over the Boulogne area. First Victory 26 June 1941, 2 Hurricane IIB’s of No. 402 Squadron – convoy patrol; Sgt G.D. Robert­son credited with a Ju.88 damaged. This was also the squadron’s first victory. 13 October 1941, 36 Spitfire IIA’s from No. 411, No. 412 and No. 266 Squadron (RAF) – fighter sweep Boulogne to Hardelot; engaged a mixed gag­gle of Bf.109’s and Fw.190’s. P/O R.W. McNair of No. 411 Squadron credited with a Bf.109 destroyed and a
second probably destroyed. McNair himself was shot down but bailed out over the Channel and was rescued. Sgt. E.N. MacDonald of No. 412 Squadron credited with a Bf.109 destroyed. Each aircraft “destroyed” was the first confirmed victory for the respective squadron. Last Mission 31 March 1944, 12 Spitfire VB’s from No. 402 Squadron and 13 from No. 64 Squadron (RAF) – “Roadstead No. 44”, Part I, close escort to 36 Beaufighters of Coastal Command detailed to attack an enemy convoy of six motor vessels known to have left Den Helder; no shipping sighted. Sum­mary Sorties: 7560. Operational/Non-operational Flying Hours: 9394/19 ,403. Victories: 38 aircraft destroyed, 18 probably destroyed, 35 damaged. Casualties (June 1943 – April 1944): Operational: 6 aircraft; 6 pilots killed.

Canadian Kenley Wing
RAF Fighter Command
Formed at Kenley, Surrey, England on 25 November 1942; disbanded on 4 July 1943 when its squadrons were trans­ferred to Second Tactical Air Force.
Wing Commanders Flying
W!C J.C. Fee, DFC 25 Nov 42 – 17 Jan 43 KIA.
W/C K.L.B. Hodson, DFC 22 Jan 43 – 28 Feb 43 OTE.
W/C J.E. Johnson (RAF), DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar 21 Mar 43 – 4 Jul 43.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Fighter Command,
Tactical Air Force Fighter Command (12 Jun 43):
No. 11 Group,
Kenley, Surrey (satellite airfield at Redhill) 25 Nov 42 – 4 Jul 43.
Operational History: First Mission 26 November 1942, 2 Spitfire VB’s of No. 401 Squadron – patrol of Shoreham­Beachy Head. First Victory 4 December 1942, 24 Spitfire VB’s from No. 401 and No. 402 Squadron, led by W/C Fee – fighter sweep Audruicq-Gravelines as withdrawal wing, engaged enemy aircraft in the Guines area (between Ambleteuse and Audruicq). No. 402 Squadron claimed 1 Fw.190 destroyed by PION.A. Keene, 1 probably destroyed and 1 damaged by F/O H.A. Simpson; 2 pilots missing, 1 wounded. No. 401 Squadron – no claims, no losses. Last Mission 4 July 1943, 24 Spitfires from No. 401 and No. 411 Squadron, led by SIL B.D. Russel – “Ramrod No. 124”, Part I, close escort to 12 Mitchells bombing Amiens. Ten to fifteen miles south of Abbeville, Blue Sec­tion of No. 411 Squadron was bounced by five Bf.109’s, and over the target Red Section was also bounced by
Bf.109’s. No. 411 Squadron claimed 1 Bf.109 damaged by F/O D.R. Matheson, reported 1 pilot missing. 24 Spitfires from No. 403 and No. 421 Squadron, led by SIL H.C. Godefroy – “Ramrod No. 124”, Part II, second fighter sweep (Somme – Amiens Estuary – Hardelot); sighted enemy aircraft, no engagement. Summary Sorties: 5936. Operational/Non-operational Flying Hours: 7996/6217. Victories: 96 aircraft destroyed, 6 probably destroyed, 54 damaged. Casualties: Wing diary does not systematically record casualties of squadrons under command.

No. 1 Wing
No. 1 Air Division Europe

Badge A stone arrowhead point up­
wards in bend
Motto Pro pace armati (Armed for
peace)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, Oc­
tober 1954
The Indian arrowhead is to symbolize
the unit’s place of origin and its desire
to be in forefront of any operation in
which it might be able to participate.
Formed as No. 1 (Fighter) Wing at
North Luffenham, Rutland, England
on 1 November 1951; moved to its
European station at Marville, France on 1 March 1955; relinquished its specialized fighter designation on 1 March 1963; moved to Lahr, Germany on 1 April 1967; inte­grated into the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 February 1968.
Commanders
CIC E.B. Hale, DFC, CD 1 Nov 51 – 19 Aug 53.
CIC J.D. Sommerville, DSO, DFC, CD 20 Aug 53 –
24 Jul 56.
CIC D.J. Williams, DSO, DFC, CD 25 Jul 56 – 18 Jun 59. CIC D.P. Hall, CD 19 Jun 59 – 1 Aug 63.
CIC A.F. Avant, DSO, DFC, CD 2 Aug 63 – 9 Aug 66. CIC R.G. Christie, CD 10 Sep 66 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formation and Wing Locations
No. 1 Air Division Europe:
North Luffenham, Rutland, Eng. 1 1 Nov 51 – 28 Feb 55. Marville, Fr. 1 Mar 55 – 31 Mar 67.
Lahr, Ger. 1 Apr 67 – 31 Jan 68.
‘While in England, the wing was under the operational command of RAF Fighter Command through its No. 11 Group.

452 Canadair Sabres cover the deck of the RCN aircraft carrier Magnificent during the transfer of aircraft from Canada to Europe as part of the establishment of the Air Division.
No. 2 Wing
Western Air Command
see North West Air Command
No. 2 Wing
No. 1 Air Division Europe
Badge: none
Formed as No. 2 (Fighter) Wing at Grostenquin, France on 1 October 1952; relinquished its specialized fighter designa­tion on 1 March 1963; disbanded on 1 August 1964. Commanders
CIC J.K.F. MacDonald, DFC, CD 1 Oct 52 – 27 Nov 52. CIC M.E. Pollard, DSO, DFC, AFC, CD 28 Nov 52 –
25 May 53.
CIC W. Weiser, MBE, DFC, CD 30 Jun 53 – 28 Sep 55. CIC W.F.M. Newson, DSO, DFC and Bar, CD 18 Oct 55 -8 Jul 57.
CIC A.B. Searle, AFC, CD 9 Jul 57 – 22 Jul 61.
CIC R.E. MacBride, DFC, CD 23 Aug 61 – 29 Jul 63 died. CIC E.R. Johnston, AFC, CD 25 Nov 63 – 1 Aug 64. Higher Formation and Wing Location
No. 1 Air Division Europe:
Grostenquin, Fr. 1 Oct 52 – 1 Aug 64.

453 No. 2 (Fighter) Wing prepares to depart for Europe at Uplands, Ont. on 23 September 1952. Canadair
Sabres of Nos. 416, 421 and 430 Squadrons line the taxi strips during the final inspection.
No. 3 Wing
No. 1 Air Division Europe
Badge The German eagle charged
with three maple leaves
Motto Agmen primum libertatis
(Freedom’s vanguard)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, April
1956
This wing was the first Canadian
wing to be stationed in Germany in
support of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization. The German eagle,
charged with the maple leaves, is to
symbolize this link with Germany
after the Second World War.
Formed as No .. 3 (Fighter) Wing at Zweibrucken, Germany on 2 February 1953; relinquished its specialized fighter designation on 1 March 1963; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 February 1968.
Commanders
GIC A.C. Hull, DFC, CD 16 Feb 53 – 9 Jan 56.
GIC J.K.F. MacDonald, DFC, CD 2 May 56 – 6 Jul 60. G/C V.L. Berg, CD 7 Jul 60 – 31 Jul 63.
GIC D.C. Laubman, DFC and Bar, CD 1 Aug 63 –
3 Aug 66.
G!C K.E. Lewis, CD 4 Aug 66 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formation and Wing Location
No. 1 Air Division Europe:
Zweibrucken, Ger. 2 Feb 53 – 31 Jan 68.

No. 4 Wing
No. 1 Air Division Europe

Badge Three lances with black and
white pennants in front of an ogress
with a Fesse wavy
Motto Auf wacht (On guard)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, March
1961
The three lances represent the three
squadrons which form the operational
forces of the wing and symbolize the
ability to carry out its duties by day
and night. The ogress and Fesse wavy
signify the Black Forest and the Rhine
River area over which the unit is on
guard.
Formed as No. 4 (Fighter) Wing at Baden-Soellingen, Ger­many on 1 July 1953; relinquished its specialized fighter designation on 1 March 1963; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 February 1968.
Commanders
G/C R.S. Turnbull, DFC, AFC, DFM, CD 8 Jul 53 – 15 Apr 55.
G/C B.E. Christmas, CD 16 Apr 55 – 23 Jul 57.
GIC R.W. McNair, DSO, DFC and 2 Bars, CD 30 Aug 57 – 14 Sep 61.
G!C J.J. Jordan, AFC, CD 15 Sep 61 – 26 Jul 65.
GIC C. Allison, CD 18 Aug 65 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formation and Wing Location
No. 1 Air Division Europe:
Baden-Soellingen, Ger. 1 Jul 53 – 31 Jan 68.

456 Canadair CF-104 12751, with drag ‘chute deployed on landing, carries the crest of No. 4 Wing under the cockpit, indicating service with either No. 421 or No. 444 (ST! A) Squadron.
No. 7 (Photographic) Wing
Air Transport Command

Formed at Rockcliffe (Ottawa), Ontario on 20 May 1944; renumbered No. 22 (Photographic) Wing on 1 April 1947; on completion of the major portion of the RCAF’s postwar commitment to photograph all of Canada, was disbanded on 30 November 1949.
Commanders
No. 7 (P) Wing
W/C J.A.E. Schwartz 20 May 44 – 11 Jan 45.
WIC S Volk 12 Jan 45 – 31 Mar 47.
No. 22 (P) Wing
WIC S. Volk 1 Apr 47 – 3 May 47.
WIC R.I. Thomas, AFC 4 May 47 – 30 Nov 49.
Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Air Force Headquarters,
Air Transport Command (1 Apr 46):
Rockcliffe, Ont. 20 May 44 – 30 Nov 49.
No. 11 Wing (Auxiliary)
Montreal, Quebec
Authorized as RCAF (Reserve) Wing Montreal on 1 October 1950, its functions were performed by No. 1 Group (Auxiliary) until 15 April 1957, when that head­quarters was disbanded, and subsequently by Air Defence Command staff; wing was formed on 1 September 1961 to administer and control No. 401 and No. 438 Squadrons; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 February 1968 as No. 11 Air Reserve Wing.
Commanders
GIC H.J. Everard, DFC, CD 1 Sep 61 – 30 Sep 64 ret. GIC J.E.M.M. Gauthier, CD 1 Oct 64 – 15 Nov 66 ret. G!C J.D. Fisher, CD 1 Sep 67 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formation and Wing Location
Air Transport Command:
Montreal, Que. 1 Sep 61 – 31 Jan 68.

No. 12 (Technical Training) Wing
(Auxiliary)
Montreal, Quebec
Authorized as RCAF (Reserve) Technical Training Wing Montreal on 15 March 1951, and redesignated No. 12
(Technical Training) Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 January 1955, its intended functions were performed by No. 1 Group
(Auxiliary).
No. 14 Wing (Auxiliary)
Toronto, Ontario
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Wing Toronto on 1 October 1950 to administer and control No. 400 and No. 411 Squadrons; redesignated RCAF (Reserve) Operational Wing (Toronto) on 15 January 1951, then No. 14 (Reserve) Operational Wing on 23 August 1951, No. 14 Operational Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951, and No. 14 Wing
(Auxiliary) on 8 November 1957; integrated into the Cana­dian Armed Forces Reserve on 1 February 1968 as No. 14 Air Reserve Wing.
Commanders
GIC G.W. Gooderham, AFC 1 Oct 50 – 30 Jun 55 ret. GIC R.C.A. Waddell, DSO, DFC, CD 1 Jul 55 – 23 Sep 59 ret.
GIC J.W.P. Draper, DFC, CD 29 Sep 59 – 31 Sep 64 ret. GIC B.A. Howard, CD 1 Oct 64 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Training Command,
Air Defence Command (1 Aug 51),
No. 2 Group (Auxilia1y) (15 Jan 51 – 1 Mar 57),
Air Transport Command (1 Oct 58):
Toronto, Ont. 1 Oct 50 – 31 Jan 68.
No. 15 (Technical Training) Wing
(Auxiliary)
Toronto, Ontario
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Technical Training Wing Toronto on 1 April 1951; redesignated No. 15 (Reserve) Technical Training Wing on 1 August 1951, then No. 15
(Technical Training) Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951; disbanded on 10 January 1958.
Commanders
WIC O.B. Coumans, MBE, CD 1 Aug 51 – 15 Sep 57 ret. W/C E.H. Mann 16 Sep 57 – 10 Jan 58.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Training Command,
Air Defence Command (1 Aug 51):
No. 2 Group (Auxiliary) (1 Apr 51 – 1 Mar 57),
Toronto, Ont. 1 Apr 51 – 10 Jan 58.
No. 16 Wing (Auxiliary)
Hamilton, Ontario
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Operational Wing Hamilton on 1 October 1950 to administer and control No. 424 Squadron; redesignated No. 16 (Reserve) Wing on 1August 1951, then No. 16 Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951; disbanded on 1 April 1964.
Commanders
GIC D.B. Annan, DFC, AFC, CD 1 Oct 50 – 30 Sep 55 ret. GIC D. Goldberg, DFC, CD 1 Oct 55 – 14 Mar 58 ret. GIC G.C. Frostad, CD 15 Mar 58 – 14 Jan 60 ret.
GIC M.G. Marshall, DFC, CD 15 Jan 60 – 21 Sep 63 ret. G/C P. Ardeline, DFC, CD 22 Sep 63 – 1 Apr 64.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Training Command,
Air Defence Command (1 Aug 51),
Training Command (1 Sep 57),
Air Transport Command (12 Sep 59):
Hamilton, Ont. 1 Oct 50 – 1 Apr 64.
No. 17 (Fighter) Wing
Second Tactical Air Force
see No. 17 Sector
No. 17 Wing (Auxiliary)
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Wing Winnipeg on 1 October 1950 to administer and control No. 402 Squadron; redesignated No. 17 (Reserve) Wing on 1 August 1951, then No. 17 Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces Reserve on 1 February 1968 as No. 17 Air Reserve Wing.
Commanders
GIC G.H. Sellers, AFC 1 Oct 50 – 16 Mar 52 ret.
GIC W.R.D. Turner, AFC 17 Mar 52 – 31 Dec 54 ret. GIC H.N. Scott, DFC, CD 1 Jan 55 – 31 Mar 59 ret.
GIC G.S. Varnam 1 Apr 59 – 15 Oct 62 ret.
GIC D.M. Gray, CD 16 Oct 62 – 31 Jan 68.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
North West Air Command,
Tactical Air Command (1 Aug 51),
Air Defence Command (1 Jan 55),
Training Command (25 Sep 57),
No. 14 (Training) Group (disbanded 11 Sep 59),
Air Transport Command (1 Apr 61):
Winnipeg, Man. 1 Oct 50 – 31 Jan 68.
No. 18 Wing (Auxiliary)
Edmonton, Alberta
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Wing Edmonton on 1 October 1950 to administer and control No. 418 Squadron; redesignated No. 18 (Reserve) Wing on 1 August 1951, then No. 18 Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951; integrated into the Canadian Armed Forces Reserve on 1 February 1968 as No. 18 Air Reserve Wing.
Commanders
G!C D.R. Jacox, AFC 1 Nov 50 – 16 Apr 52 ret.
GIC G.K. Wynn 17 Apr 52 – 17 Apr 55 ret.
GIC A.D.R. Lowe, DFC, AFC 18 Apr 55 – 30 Sep 55 ret. CIC K.M. Flint, CD 1 Oct 55 – 30 Jan 59 ret.

Higher Formations and Wing Location
North West Air Command,
Tactical Air Command (1 Aug 51),
Training Command (1 Jan 59),
No. 14 (Training) Group (disbanded 11 Sep 59), Air Transport Command (1 Apr 61): Edmonton, Alta. 1 Nov 50 – 31 Jan 68.
No. 19 Wing (Auxiliary)
Vancouver, British Columbia Badge A Sharp Shinned Hawk perch­
ed on a branch of Dogwood
Motto Vestigia nulla restrorsum (No
retreat)
Authority Queen Elizabeth II, Oc­
tober 1962
The Sharp Shinned Hawk, which is
one of the short winged birds of prey
is indigenous to the area of British
Columbia where the unit is located.
Although it is not a very large bird, it
is considered a force to be reckoned
with. The Western Dogwood is plentiful in the country over which the wing operates.
Formed as RCAF (Reserve) Wing Vancouver on 1 October 1950 to administer and control No. 442 and No. 443 Squadron; redesignated No. 19 (Reserve) Wing on 1 August 1951, then No. 19 Wing (Auxiliary) on 1 September 1951; disbanded on 1 April 1964.
Commanders
GIC G.W. Northcott, DSO, DFC and Bar 1 Oct 50 –
7 May 55 ret.
G!C E.A. McNab, AFC, CD 8 May 55 – 7 May 58 ret.
G!C R.B. Barker, DFC, CD 8 May 58 – 31 Aug 61 ret. GIC D.C. Cameron, CD 1 Sep 61 – 1 Apr 64.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
North West Air Command,
Air Defence Command (26 May 51),
Air Transport Command (1 Apr 61):
Vancouver, B.C. 1 Oct 50 – 1 Apr 64.

No. 22 (Fighter) Wing Second Tactical Air Force see No. 22 Sector

No. 22 (Photographic) Wing Air Transport Command
see No. 7 (Photographic) Wing

No. 22 Wing (Auxiliary)
London, Ontario
Formed on 15 December 1953 to administer and control No. 420 Squadron; disbanded on 1 April 1957. Commanders
CIC A.O. Haylett, AFC, CD 15 Dec 53 – 1 Apr 57. Higher Formation and Wing Location
Air Defence Command:
London, Ont. 15 Dec 53 – 1 Apr 57.
No. 23 Wing (Auxiliary)
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Formed on 1 January 1955 to administer and control No. 406 Squadron; disbanded on 1 April 1964.
Commanders
CIC A.A. Myers, CD 1 Jan 55 – 31 Mar 57 ret.
CIC E.B. Van Slyck, DFC, CD 1 Apr 57 – 31 Mar 62 ret. CIC D.J. Kelly, CD 1 Apr 62 – 1 Apr 64.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Tactical Air Command,
Training Command (1 Oct 58),
No. 14 (Training) Group (disbanded 11 Sep 59),
Air Transport Command (1 Apr 61):
Saskatoon, Sask. 1 Jan 55 – 1 Apr 64.
No. 30 Wing (Auxiliary)
Calgary, Alberta
Formed on 1 August 1954 to administer and control No. 403 Squadron; disbanded on 1 April 1964.
Commanders
CIC W.A. Mostyn-Brown, AFC, CD 1 Aug 54 – 28 Feb 59
ret.
CIC G.M. Kelly, CD 1 Mar 59 – 31 Aug 61 ret.
CIC G.E. Sargenia, CD 1 Sep 61 – 1 Apr 64.
Higher Formations and Wing Location
Air Defence Command,
Training Command (25 Jan 57),
No. 14 (Training) Group (disbanded 11 Sep 59),
Air Transport Command (1 Apr 61):
Calgary, Alta. 1 Aug 54 – 1 Apr 64.
No. 39 (Reconnaissance) Wing
RAF Second Tactical Air Force
Formed as No. 39 (Army Co-operation) Wing at Leatherhead, Surrey, England on 12 September 1942 for reconnaissance duty under the operational control of First Canadian Army; transferred to Fighter Command on 1 June 1943 and relinquished its specialized “AC” designa­tion; transferred to Second Tactical Air Force on 12 June 1943 and reorganized as No. 39 (Reconnaissance) Wing at Dunsfold, Surrey to administer and control No. 128 and No. 129 Airfield; redesignated No. 39 Sector at Odiham, Hampshire on 15 May 1944 when airfields became wings; reorganized as No. 39 (Reconnaissance) Wing at Sommervieu, France on 2 July 1944, absorbing No. 128 (Recon­naissance) Wing; disbanded at Luneberg, Germany on 7 August 1945.
Commanders
CIC D.M. Smith 12 Sep 42 – 9 Feb 44.
CIC E.H.G. Moncrieff, AFC 10 Feb 44 – 8 Feb 45.
CIC G.H. Sellers, AFC 9 Feb 45 – 15 May 45.
CIC R.C.A. Waddell, DSO, DFC 16 May 45 – 7 Aug 45. Wing Commanders Flying
WIC J.H. Godfrey 2 Jul 44 – 5 Jul 44 OTE.
WIC R.C.A. Waddell, DSO, DFC1 16 Jul 44 – 15 May 45. Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Army Co-operation Command:
No. 70 Group,
Leatherhead, Surrey 12 Sep 42 – 31 May 43.
Fighter Command:
No. 11 Group, Dunsfold, Surrey 1 Jun 43 – 11 Jun 43. Tactical Air Force Fighter Command renamed
Second Tactical Air Force (15 Nov 43):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
Dunsfold, Surrey 12 Jun 43 – 31 Jul 43.
Redhill, Surrey 1 Aug 43 – 10 Aug 43.
Woodchurch, Kent 11 Aug 43 – 13 Oct 43.
Redhill, Surrey 14 Oct 43 – 31 Mar 44.
Odiham, Hants. 1 Apr 44 – 19 Jun 44.
En route to France 20 Jun 44 – 29 Jun 44.
B.(Base) 8 Sommervieu, Fr. 30 Jun 44 – 12 Aug 44.
B.21 Ste-Honorine-de- Duey, Fr. 13 Aug 44 – 30 Aug 44. B.34 Avrilly, Fr. 31 Aug 44 – 22 Sep 44.
B.64 Diest, Bel. 23 Sep 44 – 4 Oct 44.
B.78 Eindhoven, Neth. 5 Oct 44 – 7 Mar 45.
B.90 Petit-Brogel, Bel. 8 Mar 45 – 19 Mar 45.
B.104 Damme, Ger. 20 Mar 45 – 7 Apr 45.
B.108 Rheine, Ger. 8 Apr 45 – 14 Apr 45.
B.116 Wunstorf, Ger. 15 Apr 45 – 25 Apr 45.
B.154 Soltau, Ger. 26 Apr 45 – 8 May 45.
B.156 Luneburg, Ger. 9 May 45 – 7 Aug 45.
Operational History: First Mission 1 August 1943, Mustang I’s of No. 430 Squadron from Redhill – standing patrols over a cable-laying vessel and its escort. Last Mission 8 May 1945, 4 Spitfire XI’s of No. 400 Squadron – sea patrols. Summary Sorties: 13,526. Operational/Non­operational Flying Hours: 17,267120,602. Victories: 40 air­craft destroyed, 5 probably destroyed, 25 damaged. Casualties: Operational: 42 aircraft; 27 pilots killed or missing.

No. 100 Wing (Auxiliary)
Vancouver, British Columbia
Authorized on 1 December 1938 to direct the organization and training of Auxiliary units in the Vancouver area; disbanded on 1 September 1939.
Commander
WIC A.O. Bell-Irving, MC 1 Dec 38 – 1 Sep 39.

No. 101 Wing (Auxiliary)
Toronto, Ontario
Authorized on 1 December 1938 to direct the organization and training of Auxiliary units in the Toronto area;
disbanded on 1 September 1939.
Commander
W/C W.A. Curtis, DSC 1 Dec 38 -1 Sep 39.
No. 102 Wing (Auxiliary)
Montreal, Quebec
Authorized on 1 December 1938 to direct the organization and training of Auxiliary units in the Montreal area;
disbanded on 1 September 1939.
Commander
WIC J.A. Sully, AFC 1 Dec 38 -1 Sep 39.
No. 120 (Transport) Wing
RAF Transport Command
Formed at RCAF Overseas Headquarters, London, England on 17 September 1945 to transport passengers, casualties, freight and mail in support of Canadian occupation forces in Germany; moved to Odiham, Hampshire on 7 October 1945; disbanded on 30 June 1946.
Commanders
G/C H.H.C. Rutledge, OBE 12 Sep 45 -14 Jan 46.
GIC R.J. Lane, DSO, DFC and Bar 15 Jan 46 -12 Jun 46.
Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Transport Command:
No. 46 Group,
London, Eng. 17 Sep 45 -6 Oct 45.
Odiham, Hants. 7 Oct 45 -30 Jun 46.
Summary of Operations Sorties: 1459. Operational/Non­operational Flying Hours: 17,056/1959. Airlifted: 50,961 passengers (including 3338 casualties), 511.9 tons of mail, 1978. 9 tons of freight.
No. 126 (Fighter) Wing
RAF Second Tactical Air Force

Badge Four dragons’ heads conjoined Motto Fortitudo vincit (Courage
wins)
Authority King George VI, May 1946
The four dragons’ heads spitting fire represent the four Spitfire squadrons which composed the wing.
Formed as No. 126 Airfield at Redhill, Surrey, England on 4 July 1943 with Spitfire aircraft;

redesignated No. 126 (Fighter) Wing
at Tangmere, Sussex on 15 May 1944; transferred to the British Air Forces of Occupation (Germany) on 6 July 1945; disbanded at Utersen, Germany on 1 April 1946.
Commanders
W/C J.E. Walker, DFC and 2 Bars 9 Yul 4.’:\ -?.A A110 in

GIC G.R. McGregor, OBE, DFC 20 Jul 44 -27 Sep 45.
G/C W.E. Bennett 28 Sep 45 -1 Apr 46.
Wing Commanders Flying
W/C B.D. Russel, DFC 9 Jul 43 -16 Oct 43 2 OTE.
W/C R.W. McNair, DSO, DFC and 2 Bars 17 Oct 43 -12 Apr 44.
WIC G.C. Keefer, DFC and Bar 17 Apr 44 -7 Jul 44
2 OTE.
WIC B.D. Russel, DSO, DFC and Bar 8 Jul 44 -26 Jan 45
3OTE.
WIC G.W. Northcott, DSO, DFC and Bar 27 Jan 45 -1 Apr 46.
Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Tactical Air Force Fighter Command, renamed
Second Tactical Air Force (15 Nov 43):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
No. 17 (RCAF) Sector (disbanded 13 Jul 44),
Redhill, Surrey 5 Jul 43 -5 Aug 43.
Staplehurst, Kent 6 Aug 43 -12 Oct 43.
Biggin Hill, Kent 13 Oct 43 -14 Apr 44.
Tangmere, Sussex 15 Apr 44 -8 Jun 44.
En route to France 9 Jun 44 -15 Jun 44.
B.(Base) 3 Ste Croix-sur-Mer, Fr. 16 Jun 44 -17 Jun 44.
8.4 Beny-sur-Mer, Fr. 18 Jun 44 -7 Aug 44.
8.18 Cristot, Fr. 8 Aug 44 -2 Sep 44.
8.44 Poix, Fr. 3 Sep 44 -6 Sep 44.
8.56 Evere, Bel. 7 Sep 44 -10 Sep 44.
B.68 Le Culot, Bel. 21 Sep 44 -3 Oct 44.
B.84 Rips, Neth. 4 Oct 44 -13 Oct 44.
B.80 Volkel, Neth. 14 Oct 44 -6 Dec 44.
B.88 Heesch, Neth. 7 Dec 44 -11 Apr 45.
B.108 Rheine, Ger. 12 Apr 45 -14 Apr 45.
B.116 Wunstorf, Ger. 15 Apr 45 -11 May 45.
B.152 Fassberg, Ger. 12 May 45 -4 Jul 45.
B.174 Utersen, Ger. 5 Jul 45.
British Air Forces of Occupation (Germany):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
B.174 Utersen, Ger. 6 Jul 45 -1 Apr 46.
Operational History: First Mission 6 July 1943, 24 Spitfire VB’s of No. 401 and No. 411 Squadron from Redhill, led by SIL B.D. Russel (commanding No. 411 Squadron) – “Rodeo No. 240”, Part II, fighter sweep of the Gravelines­Berck area. First Victory 15 July 1943, 24 Spitfire VB’s of No. 401 and No. 411 Squadron from Redhill, led by W/C B.D. Russel -“Ramrod No. 142”, close support to 12
Bostons of No. 107 Squadron bombing Poix aerodrome. After leaving the target area, the formation was attacked by some 20 Fw.190’s. SIL G.C. Semple, commanding No. 411 Squadron, credited with a Fw.190 damaged. The wing had no losses. 3 October 1953, 24 Spitfire IX’s of No. 403 and No. 421 Squadron from Staplehurst -“Ramrod No. 257”, Part I, top cover for 72 Marauders of the US Eighth Air Force bombing Woensdrecht aerodrome, attacked over the target by some 25 enemy aircraft. SIL R.W. McNair, commanding No. 421 Squadron, credited with a Fw.190 destroyed. The wing had no losses. Last Mission 5 May
1945, 8 Spitfire IXB’s of No. 401 Squadron from Wunstorf -two 4-plane armed recces of the Hamburg area.
Summary Sorties: 29,631. Operational/Non-operational Flying Hours: 40,548/12,635. Victories: 355½ aircraft
destroyed, 15 probably destroyed and 168 damaged, 1 V-1 destroyed. Casualties: Operational: 162 aircraft; 123 pilots

No. 127 (Fighter) Wing
RAF Second Tactical Air Force
Formed as No. 127 Airfield at Kenley, Surrey, England on 4 July 1943 with Spitfire aircraft; redesignated No. 127
(Fighter) Wing at Tangmere, Sussex on 15 May 1944; disbanded at Soltau, Germany on 7 July 1945. Commanders
WIC M. Brown 11 Jul 43 – 18 Jul 44.
GIC W.R. MacBrien, OBE 19 Jul 44 – 11 Jan 45.
GIC P.S. Turner, DSO, DFC and Bar 12 Jan 45 – 7 Jul 45. Wing Commanders Flying
WIC J.E. Johnson (RAF), DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar 5 Jul 43 – 18 Sep 43 2OTE.
WIC H.C. Godefroy, DSO, DFC and Bar 19 Sep 43 – 15 Apr 44 2OTE.
W/C L.V. Chadburn, DSO and Bar, DFC 16 Apr 44 – 12 Jun 44 KIA’.
W/C R.A. Buckham, DFC and Bar 13 Jun 44 -5 Jul 44
OTE.
WIC J.E. Johnson (RAF), DSO and 2 Bars, DFC and Bar 4 Jul 44 – 30 May 45.
W/C J.F. Edwards, DFC and Bar, DFM 6 Apr 45 – 7 Jul 45. Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Tactical Air Force Fighter Command, renamed
Second Tactical Air Force (15 Nov 43):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
No. 17 (RCAF) Sector (disbanded 13 Jul 44),
Kenley, Surrey 5 Jul 43 – 5 Aug 43.
Lashenden, Kent 6 Aug 43 – 19 Aug 43.
Headcorn, Kent 20 Aug 43 – 13 Oct 43.
Kenley, Surrey 14 Oct 43 – 16 Apr 44.
Tangmere, Sussex 17 Apr 44 – 7 Jun 44.
En route to France 8 Jun 44 – 15 Jun 44.
B.(Base) 2 Crepon, Fr. 16 Jun 44 – 27 Aug 44.
8.26 Marcilly-la-Campagne, Fr. 28 Aug 44 – 17 Sep 44. 8.68 Le Culot, Bel. 18 Sep 44 – 26 Sep 44.
B.82 Grave, Neth. 27 Sep 44 – 21 Oct 44.
8.58 Melsbroek, Bel. 22 Oct 44 – 3 Nov 44.
B.56 Evere, Bel. 4 Nov 44 – 1 Mar 45.
B.90 Petit-Brogel, Bel. 2 Mar 45 – 30 Mar 45.
B.78 Eindhoven, Neth. 31 Mar 45 – 7 Apr 45.
B .100 Goch, Ger. 8 Apr 45 – 12 Apr 45.
B.114 Diepholz, Ger. 13 Apr 45 – 25 Apr 45.
B.154 Soltau, Ger. 26 Apr 45 – 7 Jul 45.
Operational History: First Mission and Victories 6 July 1943, 24 Spitfire !X’s of No. 403 and No. 421 Squadron from Kenley, led by S/L H.C. Godefroy, commanding No. 403 Squadron – “Rodeo No. 240”, Part I, second fighter sweep of Dieppe-Amiens-Doullens area, engaged two enemy formations. Near Amiens, 12 Bf.109’s were sighted flying southeast and No. 403 Squadron was detailed to at­tack. The enemy aircraft immediately dived through cloud towards Abbeville except for their leader, who started to tum and was shot down by F/L H.D. Macdonald. At Doullens, 5 Bf.109’s flying southeast were engaged by No. 421 Squadron, led by SIL R.W. McNair. Most of the enemy evaded combat by flying into the cloud, though not before S/L McNair had destroyed one Bf.109 and F/L
A.H. Sager had damaged a second. Both engagements were without loss to the wing. Last Mission 7 May 1945, 52 Spit­fire sorties from Soltau – escort to Dakotas, Stirlings and Halifaxes flying supplies to Copenhagen, Denmark.

Summary Sorties: 26,798. Operational/Non-operational Flying Hours: 38,003/9216. Victories: 245¼ aircraft destroyed, 14 probably destroyed, 155½ damaged. Casualties: Operational: 133 aircraft; 106 pilots killed or missing.
‘Flying Spitfire IX MJ824 LV-C; mid-air collision over the Normandy beachhead.

457 Supermarine Spitfire L.F.Mk. V EP548, flown by the leader of No. 127 Wing, WIC Lloyd Vernon Chadburn. Coded L V-C (his initials), the aircraft carried the Wing Commander’s pennant on the forward left cowl, and under the cockpit the inscription “City of Oshawa” was displayed.
No. 128 (Reconnaissance) Wing
RAF Second Tactical Air Force
Formed as No. 128 Airfield at Dunsfold, Surrey, England on 4 July 1943 with Mustang aircraft; redesignated No. 128 (Reconnaissance) Wing at Odiham, Hampshire on 15 May 1944; disbanded on 2 July 1944 at Sommervieu, France, and absorbed into No. 39 Sector, which then became No. 39 (Reconnaissance) Wing.
Commanders
SIL J.D. Hall, DFC 20 Jul 43 – 3 Aug 43.
W/C J.M. Godfrey 4 Aug 43 – 2 Jul 44.
Higher Formations and Wing Locations
Tactical Air Force Fighter Command renamed
Second Tactical Air Force (15 Nov 43):
No. 83 (Composite) Group,
No. 39 (RCAF) Sector,
Dunsfold, Surrey 4 Jul 43 – 27 Jul 43.
Woodchurch, Kent 28 Jul 43 – 14 Oct 43.
Redhill, Surrey 15 Oct 43 – 18 Feb 44.
Odiham, Hants. 19 Feb 44 – 30 Jun 44.
En route to France 1 Jul 44.
B.(Base) 8 Sommervieu, Fr. 2 Jul 44.
Operational History: First Mission 6 July 1943, 2 Mustang I’s of No. 400 Squadron from Dunsfold – in search of ground targets in the Mont St Michel-Laval-Cabourg area,