Historical Aircraft

Additional Losses – Eager to Zulauf

 

EAGER, W. H. 117626/Rl 19972. Please refer to page 205 and note the following – EAGER PIO William Hedley (JI 7626) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.61 Squadron – Award effective 6 November 1943 as per London Gazene dated 16 November 1943 and AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943. Born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 1920; home in Winnipeg. Trained at No. 7 ITS (graduated 13 February 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 24 April 1942) and No. l O SFTS (graduated 29 August 1942). Commissioned 1943. No citation in AFRO other than completed many successful operations against the enemy in which [he) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty. Detail providedby H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
EINARSON, J. W. 117276. Please refer to page 210 and note the following – EINARSON, FS Johann Walter
(R87302) – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.44 Squadron – Award effective 12 April I 943 as per London Gazene dated 20 April 1943 and AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943. Born at Wynard, Saskatchewan, 1920; home in Shallbrook, Saskatchewan. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 10 February I 941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 9 May 1941), No.15 EFTS (graduated 3 July 1941), and No.I ISFTS (graduatedl 1 September 1941). Commissioned 1943. The citation reads – “This pilot has displayed the greatest possible determination to locate and bomb his larget on all possible occasions. He has taken part in many long and dangerous raids on a variety of targets in Germany and Italy including the recent raids on Berlin. He has also secured good photographs. His calmness and courage have inspired great confidence in his crew and contributed to the success of many missions.” EINARSON, F/O Johann
Walter, DFM (JI 7276) – Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.61 Squadron – Award effective 8 January 1944 as per London Gazene dated 25 January 1944 and AFRO 4 I 0/44 dated 25 February 1944. The citation reads – “This officer has completed a very large number of sorties including five anacks on Berlin. On the last occasion one night in November 1943, his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and sustained damage. Nevertheless, Flying Officer Einarson pressed home his attack. Soon after the bombs had been released, the aircraft was struck, the starboard wing tip and pan of the aileron were tom away and the aircraft went imo a steep dive. Flying Officer Einarson succeeded in regaining control and afterwards flew safely to an airfield in this country. Throughout his tour of operations this officer has invariably displayed a high degree of skill, courage and determination.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
EMERSON, T. H. N. J18062//R94212. Please refer to page 214 and note the following- El½ERSON, FS (now P/O) Thomas Henry Navin (R94919/Jl8062)­
Distinguished Flying Medal – No.405 Squadron – Award effective 13 July 1944 as per London Gazette dated 28 July and AFRO 2160/44 dated 6 October 1944. Originally published as a DFC citation in AFRO 2052/44, canceled by AFRO 2101/44 and then corrected. Born in Moose Jaw, 1918; home there. Trained at No.J ITS (graduated 23 January 1942) and No.2 BGS (graduated 13 April 1942. Commissioned 1943. Killed in action with No.405 Squadron, 13 July 1943 (Halifax HR905); buried in Holland. The citation reads – “Throughout all his sorties this airman has displayed exceptional ability as an air gunner. Many of his missions have been completed in the face of intense opposition. Throughout all his operations he has invariably shown high courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
ERL Y, J.P. J3264. Please refer to page 216 and note the following – ERL Y, P/O James Paul (13264)­Distinguished Flying Cross – No.106 Squadron – Award effective 2 September 1941 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941. Born in Toronto, 1916, home there. Private, Canadian Grenadier Guards before joining RCAF, 1934. Trained at No. I ITS, No. l AOS, No. 1 BGS; graduated from No. l ANS, 23 December 1940. Arrived at No.16 OTU, 16 February 1941; posted from No.16 OTU to No.106 Squadron, 3 May 1941; first appears in unit O!Uf,’ 4 Mi’iy’194 l. Killed in action, 22 August 1941 (Hampden AE220); buried in Germany. Cited among 51 decorated (five DSOs, 26 DFCs, 20 DFMs) with the following joint citation: In July 1941, large scale attacks were made on German warships at Brest and La Pallice (including the Gneisenau, Schamhorst and Prince Eugene ). A smaller attack was made on Cherbourg. The operations were carried out in
r daylight and extremely heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fi e and fighter opposition were encountered by all aircraft when approaching the targets, which at Brest were protected by a balloon barrage. The aircrews engaged succeeded, nevertheless, in securing direct hits on their objectives and in inflicting very severe damage in the target area. During the combats with enemy fighters, 21 hostile aircraft were destroyed and others were severely damaged. The precise timing of the attack by the various formations of aircraft and their correct approach and accurate bombing of the objective in the face of such powerful opposition demanded great skill and high courage. The great success of these operations was largely due to the bravery, determination and resource displayed by the following officers and airmen, who participated in various capacities as leaders and members of the aircraft crews. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
EVANS, E. R. Jl7548//Rl00269. Please refer to page 217 and note the following – EV ANS, P/O Earle Robert
(JI 7548) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.90 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazene dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Born in Winnipeg, 1921; home there; enlisted there 2 April 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 4 October 1941 ), No.14 EFTS (graduated 29 November 1941) and No.4 BGS (graduated30 March 1942). Commissioned 1943. The citation reads – “When returning from his fifth operational sortie Pilot Officer Evans was involved in a serious crash. FOWLOW, N. R. 115095. Please refer to page 240 and note the following – FIL Fowlow was from Hodges Cove, Newfowidland, not Winnipeg, Manitoba. FOWLOW, FIL Nonnan Ralph (JI 5095) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.421 Squadron – Award effective 9 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1943 and AFRO 2386/43 dated 19 November 1943. Born 1921 in Hodges Cove, Newfoundland; home Windsor, Nova Scotia. Enlisted in Halifax 22 August 1940. Commissioned 1941. Trained at No.l ITS (graduated 14 December 1940), No.I I EFTS (graduated 28 January 1941) and No.2 SFTS
(graduated 4 April 1941). Killed in action 19 May 1944. The citation reads – “This officer has taken part in a very large number of sorties and has proved himself to be a skillful and courageous fighter. He has destroyed four and shared in the destruction of another enemy aircraft.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. FOY, B.G. JI 3833. Please refer to page 241 and note tl1e following. The crew were on special operations over France when it crashed near the Swiss mowitains. F/O. Vinet was taken Prisoner Of War, FS. Bell was an Evader and was returned to his Squadron. Detail provided by Bob Middleton ofKillamey, Manitoba.
FRASER, H. S. R64674. Please refer to page 242 and note the following – WO. Fraser was 23 years old at the time of death not 20. Detail provided by DA. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. FOY, B.G. 113833. Please refer to page 241 and note the following. The crew were on special operations over France when it crashed near the Swiss mowitains. F/O. Vinet was taken Prisoner Of War, FS. Bell was an Evader and was returned to his Squadron. Detail provided by Bob Middleton ofKillamey, Manitoba.
FRASER, H. S. R64674. Please refer to page 242 and note the following – WO. Fraser was 23 years old at the time of death not 20. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. GALBRAITH, R. F. Jl 1978. Please refer to page 250 and note the following -GALBRAITH, F/0 (now FIL) Robert Francis -Air Medal (United States)-I Ith USAAF (deceased)-Award effective 27 August 1943 as per
Canada Gazette dated 4 May 1946 and AFRO 473/46 dated IO May 1946. Home in Shelburne, Ontario. Enlisted
Toronto 6 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 5 December 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 30 January 1942), and No.13 SFTS (graduated 5 June 1942). Killed in action 5 April 1945 while serving with No.181 Squadron. Details found in DHist file 181.009 D.4402 (RG.24 Vol.20648) where USAAF 11th Air Force General Order No. I 06 dated 27 August 1943, on behalf of Alaska Defence Command, lists officers receiving Air Medal for meritorious
achievement in aerial flight with the following citation; NOTE: The same order awards posthumous Air Medals to
I
15216 FL D.W.N. Wakeling (Vancouver, flights I January to 6 May 1943), JI 1978 FIL R.F. Galbraith (Shelburne,
flights 18 April to 26 July, 1943), and 127371 PIO R.M. Bell (Hot Springs, Arkansas, flights 19 April to IO August
1943). Apparently not approved by RCAF authorities.
The file contains much operational information on all those decorated on this occasion. All were in No.14 (F)
Squadron. The citation reads -“These officers, as pilots of fighter planes, participated in numerous attacks on
enemy installations in the Aleutians which were pressed
home despite heavy anti-aircraft fire and often under
adverse weather conditions. All flights were made from
advanced bases and required skillful airmanship for a
successful execution of the mission. The courage and
devotion to duty of these officers reflect great credit upon themselves and the organization of which they are a part.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GARDINER, R. A. JI 5548. Please refer to page 252 and note the following -FIL Gardiner was from Elmwood,
Ontario, not Hanover, Ontario. He was 25 years old at time
of death, not 23. GARDINER, FIL Raymond Arthur
(Jl 5548)-Distinguished Flying Cross -No.405 Squadron – Award effective l September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO 2138/43 dated 22
October 1943. Born at Ingersol, Ontario, 1918; home in
Elmwood, Ontario. Enlisted in Hamilton, 21 August 1940. Trained at No.4 BGS (graduated 10 April 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 17 March 1941 ). The citation reads -‘Since July 1942, Flight Lieutenant Gardiner has been
sig11als leader of his squadron. He has participated in
many operational sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany including Bremen, Essen and Duisburg. Throughout bis operational career he has
displayed high courage and devotion to duty.” Detail
provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.GARDINER, L. H. C. J18855. Please refer to page 252 and note the following -F/O Gardiner was 27 years old at time of death, not 22. GARDINER, WO Llewellyn
Hugh Cloverdale (R67228) -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.420 Squadron -Award effective 12 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943 and AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943. Born in Kingston, Ontario, 1917;
home there (book keeper). Enlisted in Kingston, 15
October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27
November 1940), No.3 EFTS (left at unknown date), No. I BGS (graduated 4 August 1941 ), No. I AOS (graduated 22 June 1941), and No.I CNS. DHist card adds Air
Navigation School (graduated I September 1941 ). The
citation reads -“Warrant Officer Gardiner is a most
skillful navigator, who has attacked a wide variety of
targets including Hamburg, Rostock, Cologne and
Duisburg. He has also participated in sorties to Turin and Lorient. On several occasions he attacked the target and flew his aircraft back to base despite the most adverse
weather. He has set a high standard of navigational skill and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GARLAND, S. F. 116208. Please refer to page 253 and note the following -F/K Garland was 26 years old at time of death, not 23. GARLAND, P/O Stewart Foster (Jl 6208) -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.40 Squadron -Award effective 24 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943 and AFRO 2386/43 dated 19 November 1943. Born in Ottawa, 1918; home there o enlisted 22
October I 941. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 25
September 1941), No.20 EFTS (graduated 6 December
I 941) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 27 March 1942). TI1e citation reads -“This officer is an extremely keen and
efficient captain who has earned many successes. One
night in July 1943 he executed a most successful attack on the marshaling yards at Reggio di Calabria, although his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire during the bombing
run. Pilot Officer Garland pressed home his attack starting many fires. He also secured an excellent photograph. His high morale and fine record have set an excellent example.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GAUTSCH!, N.V. 125073. Please refer to page 256 and add to the crew list Sgt. J.M. McLachlan (RAF) was also killed and was buried in the same cemetery as Gautschi. This completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joel
Huard, Serquigny, France.
GAUTSCH!, N. V. 125073//Rl 75073. Please refer to
page 256 and note the following -GAUTSCH!, F/O
Norman Vincent (125073) -Distinguished Flying Cross – No. I 06 Squadron ( deceased) • Award effective 6 July 1944 as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1946 and AFRO 244/46 dated 8 March 1946. Som in Vancouver, I 917;
served in Seaforth Highlanders. Enlisted March 1942.
Trained at No.I ]TS (graduated 27 December
1942), No.7BGS(graduated21 February 1943)andNo.7 AOS (graduated 16 April 1943). Killed in action 7/8 July 1944; buried in France. SHOULD HIS NAME BE
GAUTISCHI, AS SPELLED IN CASUALTY LIST? 1l1e citation reads -“Flying Officer Gautschi has taken
pan in attacks on many of the most heavily defended
targets in Germany, including Berlin, Augsburg, Essen, and Stuttgart. On his first operational flight he obtained an
excellent photograph of the aiming point and on his second sonie a few nights later he made a telling attack on an
enemy aircraft factory and also obtained a fine photograph. This officer has on all his subsequent operations
maintained this high standard and his accuracy and
steadiness as bomb aimer have made him a most valuable member of his crew.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GEEVES, G. E. Jl 9058//R77158. Please refer to page 257 and note the following -GEEVES, F/O Gerald
Edward (Jl9058) -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.405
Squadron -Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Montreal, 1910; enlisted there 14 October 1940. Trained at No.) WS (graduated 28 April
1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 24 November 1941 ).
Passed OTU, 19 May 1942. No citation other than
“completed … numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has) invariably displayed the utmost fonitude, courage and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/8831 has recommendation dated 20 November 1944 when he had flown 48 sorties (220 hours 52 minutes) in two tours.
First Tour
24 Aug 42 Ferry to Gibraltar(8.00)
25 Aug 42 Ferry to Gibraltar(8.45)
26 Aug 42 Malta-Egypt (7.45)
8 Oct 42 Tobruk (7 .30)
14 Oct 42 Tobruk (6.10) 23 Oct 42 Battle area (2.30) 24 Oct 42 Battle area (2.30) 29 Oct 42 Battle area (2.30) 30 Oct 42 Battle area (2.30) 2 Nov 42 Ghazal (3.00)
4 Nov 42 Daba (3.45)
5 Nov 42 Messa Fuka Row (3.35)
6 Nov 42 Messa Fuka Row (3.45)
7 Nov 42 Sollurn (6.30)
9 Nov 42 Fort Capuzzo (6.05)
11 Nov 42 Derna (8.55)
23 Nov 42 Haraklion Aerodrome(6.04)
7 Dec 42 LG.17 to Malta (6.00)
13 Dec 42 La Goulette, Tunis(4.34)
15 Dec 42 Tunis Harbour (4.35)
16 Dec 42 La Goulette, Tunis
18 Dec 42 Comico Aerodrome, Sicily (2.40) 25 Dec 42 Pantelero Aerodrome(6.35)
28 Feb 43 Malta-Gibralter (7.30)
Second Tour
10 Jul 44 Nucourt (2.45)
12 Jul 44 Paris/Vaires(3.08)
15 Jul 44 Nucourt (3.30)
17 Jul 44 Cagny (2.30)
28 Jul 44 Stuttgart (6. 17)
30 Jul 44 Battle area (2.34)
3 Aug 44 Nieppe (2.03)
4 Aug 44 L oisle Adam (2.44)
14 Aug 44 TRACTABLE (2.41)
15 Aug 44 Meisbroek (4.15)
16 Aug 44 Stettin (4.57)
18 Aug 44 Sterkrade (3.34)
25 Aug 44 Russelsheim (5.42)
26 Aug 44 Kiel (5.24)
29 Aug 44 Stettin (8.32)
15 Sep 44 Kiel (5.23) 30 Sep 44 Bonrop (3.23)
11 Oct 44 Fort Fredrik Hendrik(2.09) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (3.55)
15 Oct 44 Wilhelmsbaven (4.06) 9 Oct 44 Stuttgart (5.09)
25 Oct 44 Homburg (3.40)
28 Oct 44 Walcheren(4.35)
16 Nov 44 Julich (4.35)
Flying Officer Geeves is an outstanding Air Gunner in a
highly successful crew now on their second tour of
operations. He has participated in attacks on such heavily defended enemy areas as Stuttgart, Kiel and Stettin.
Invariably, this officer has displayed a keen sense of
responsibility and great courage in the performance of all his operational tasks. On many occasions he has been
placed in a position where great personal danger existed, but this has not deterred him from carrying out his duties in a cool and efficient manner. His fine example of
fearlessness and devotion to duty is very commendable. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.GERMAN, H. W. 110730. Please refer to page 258 and note the following -GERMAN, Sergeant (now P/O)
Harold Wallace (R56853/Jl0730) -Air Force Medal -No.7 SFTS -Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London
Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January
1943. Born in Altona, Manitoba, 17 June 1921. Home in Pilot Mound, Manitoba. Trained at No. I ITS (graduated 28 June 1940), Border Cities Aero Club (graduated 31 July 1940) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 4 October 1940). The
citation reads -“This NCO has performed his duties as Navigation Instructor both in the air and as a lecturer in Ground Instruction School in an exemplary, whole-hearted and meritorious manner. He has shown exceptional
keenness in his work and has constantly given instruction after normal working hours to improve the standing of his classes with most satisfactory results. He is possessed of a pleasing personality and his general relationship with all personnel has been of the highest standard. He has 650
flying hours.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GIBBONS, N. J. 112273. Please refer to page 259 and note the following -FIL Gibbons was 24 years old at the time of death, not 29. GIBBONS, F/O Noel (112273) –
Distinguished Flying Cross -No.418 Squadron -Award
effective 2 March 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1944 and AFRO 766/44 dated 6 April 1944. Born in Grand Prairie, Alberta, 1920; home in Vancouver;
enlisted there 2 October 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS
(graduated 19 December 1941), No.8 BGS (graduated 9 May 1942), No.2 AOS (graduated 27 March 1942) and
No.I ANS (graduated 8 June 1942). Cited with FIL James Robert Feir Johnson. The citation reads -“As pilot and
observer, respectively, these officers have completed a
large number of sorties. They have displayed great skill
and determination throughout, and their example of
keenness and devotion to duty has been most
commendable. They have destroyed at least four enemy
aircraft.”
GIBBONS, FIL Noel (112273) -Bar to Distinguished
Flying Cross -No.418 Squadron (deceased) -Award
effective 21 October 1944, as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946. 111e citation reads -“Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, Flight Lieutenant Gibbons has completed
many sorties, penetrating deeply into Germany and enemy occupied territory. On each occasion his skillful navigation has enabled bis
pilot to reach and patrol the target area, often in very
adverse weather, while his excellent commentaries when patrolling heavily defended enemy airfields have assisted his pilot in talcing successful evasive action. In September, 1943, Flight Lieutenant Gibbons was responsible for
navigating a section of aircraft through adverse weather
and over difficult terrain to a target in the Munich area. At Bad Aibling be participated in the destruction of two
enemy aircraft on the ground and damaged two others. As squadron navigation leader this officer has done much to maintain a high standard of navigation.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GILCHRIST, D.R. Rl52522. Please refer to page 262
and add the following. The squadron was based at
Elvington when Halifax aircraft# W 7813-C was shot
down. The two RAF members of the crew who were also killed were Sgt.s H. Roots and J.R. McLeod. This
completes this crew list Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
GILL, H. L. R64935. Please refer to page 262 and note the following -GILL, FS Harry Lewis, (R64935) •
Distinguished Flying Medal• No.607 Squadron· Award
effective 17 March 1942 as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1943 and AFRO 61 1/42 dated 24 April 1942.
Born in South Devon, New Brnnswick, 1922; home there (labourer). Enlisted in Moncton, 22 August 1940. Trained at No. I ITS and No.11 EFTS. Graduated from No.2 SFTS, IO April 1941. Arrived in UK, 24 April 1941 and fitrther trained at No.55 OTIJ. The citation reads• “Since joining the squadron in July 1941, this airman has carried out
several offensive fighter patrols over enemy territory both by day and by night. Targets attacked included power
stations, large concentration distilleries and factories. On one occasion Flight Sergeant Gill sighted two of our
aircraft which had been forced down onto the sea and
remained over tl1em until driven off by a formation of
enemy fighters. On 12th February 1942 this airman
participated in operations against a GemlaD battleship and their escorts and pressed home his attack with great
detemtlnation in the face of fierce enemy opposition. He
damaged at least one enemy motor vessel and one enemy
aircraft. This airman has always displayed initiative and
keenness and has proved himself to be an inspiration to his fellow pilots.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GILMORE, E.G. C1036. Please refer to page 264 and
note the following -Sil.. Gilmore was 30 years old at time of death, not 23. GILMORE, S/L Edward Gerard (Cl036) · Distinguished Flying Cross• No.408 Squadron -Award
effective 24 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6
April 1943 and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943. Born in Toronto, 1913; home there. Enlisted in Toronto, I August
1939. Cited with Sergeant J.W.T.M. Smith (RAF, awarded DFM). Killed in action with No.408 Squadron, 5 April
1943 (Halifax BB336); name on Runnymede Memorial.
TI1e citation reads• “One night in February 1943,
Squadron Leader Gilmore and Sergeant Smith were
captain and bomb aimer respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. Whilst over the target area the aircraft was subjected to heavy anti-aircraft fire and sustained much damage. 1l1e aircraft went out of control and considerable height was lost before Squadron Leader Gilmore regained conlrol. The bomber was riddled by shell splinters and one of his propellers was shot away, two compasses were
rendered useless and all navigational charts were lost.
Nevertheless, Squadron Leader Gilmore flew the damaged bomber to an airfield near the coast, having received
valuable assistance from Sergeant Smith, who by use of
the bomb sight compass, displayed skillful navigation.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GLASS, H. C87159. Please refer to page 266 and note the following -GLASS, Sergeant Harry (R156584) –
Distinguished Flying Medal -No.429 Squadron• Award effective 27 April 1944 as per London Gazeae dated 2 May 1944 and AFRO 1186/44 dated 2 June 1944. Born 1921 in Dufferin, Ontario; home in Toronto; enlisted there 21 April 1941. Later commissioned (C87159). Killed in action
with No.429 Squadron, 8 August 1944 (Halifa.x LW132); buried in Britain. The citation reads -”This airman was
the flight engineer of an aircraft detailed to attack
Nuremberg one night in March 1944. During the
operation the aircraft was repeatedly attacked by fighters and sustained extensive damage. A fire commenced but Sergeant Glass, by his gallant and determined efforts,
succeeded in extinguishing the flames. Later, whilst over the North Sea on the homeward flight, the pilot was
forced to bring the aircraft down on to the water. Two
wounded members of the crew were in danger of losing
their lives but were saved by Sergeant Glass who also
assisted other members of the crew into the dinghy. He
proved a tower of strength in most distressing
circumstances.” Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario.
GLAZEBROOK, E. H. 15329. Please refer to page 266 and note the following -GLAZEBROOK, Fil.. Edwin
Herbert (15329) -Distinguished Flying Cross• No.229
Squadron -Award effective 22 October 1942 as per
London Gazette dated 3 November 1942 and AFRO
1962/42 dated 4 December 1942. Born in Outremont,
Quebec, 18 August 1918; enlisted in Montreal, 7 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 January 1941),
No.12 EFTS (graduated 24 February 1941), and No.I
SITS (graduated 16 May 1941. LAC, 2 January 1941;
Sergeant, 16 May 1941; P/O, 17May 194l;F/O, 17 May 1942; Fil.. 30 August 1942. Served in Malla; killed in
flying accident (Liberator crash at Gibraltar), 31 October
1942. The citation reads -·’111is officer has participated in many sorties over Sicily. In the heavy fighting over Malta be has taken part in many interceptions and his flight has destroyed twelve enemy aircraft. By his skillful and
courageous leadership Flight Lieutenant Glazebrook
played a large part in the successes obtained.” Detail
provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GODIN, J.J. Rl51252. Please refer to page 268 and note the following. On Wednesday 6th July 1994 at 11.00 a.m. a Service of Dedication of a Memorial to the crew of
Halifax Bomber MZ 519 LK-U commemorating the 5011,
Anniversary was held at St. Michael’s Church, Famfield. The memorial was unveiled by Air Marshall Sir John
Curtiss, K.C.B., K.B.E. with the dedication by The
Archdeacon of Nottingham, Ven. Tom Walker, MA. The memorial was erected, and a copse of trees planted in their memory, at the site of the crash. The other six members of the crew were all RAF and are P/O. R. Parfitt, F/O. B.G.
Turnidge, Sgt.s R.A. Rolph, T.F. Pitts, L.G. Leathani, and T.A. Hill. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
Middlesborough, England. GOHL, J. G. 18356. Please refer to page 266 and note
the following -GOHL, F/O James Garfield (18356) • Air Medal (United States)-Alaska -Award effective 23
December 1942 as per AFRO 272/43 dated 19 Febru3J)’
1943. Born in Carman, Manitoba, 13 June 1919. Home in Boissevain, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, I March
1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 16 June 1941 ), No.2 EFTS (graduated 7 August 1941), and No.2 SFTS
(graduated 24 October 1941 ). Killed in action, 11 June
1944 with No.440 Squadron (Typhoon MNl 15); name on Runnymede Memorial. United States Air Medal -No.111 Squadron, Alaska• Award effective 23 December 1942 as per AFRO 272/43 dated 19 Febru3J)’ 1943. The citation for F/O R. Lynch and F/O Garfield reads· “On 25th
September 1942, they voluntarily flew with United States Anny combat pilots, accompanying heavy bombers in
making a hazardous five hundred mile over water flight in order to press home an attack on the enemy at JGska
Island, Alaska. Although the mission of protecting the
bombing planes from anti-aircraft fire and enemy fighters was completed, the fighters returned to strafe all enemy
installations with remarkable success. All planes returned
I
safely to base.” GOHL, FL James Garfield (18356) –
Mention in Despatches • No.111 Squadron (Canada), now at Station Patricia Bay. Award effective I Janu3J)’ 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. The citation reads -”This officer has led his squadron and panicipated in many bombing and
strafing attacks against the enemy. Although bad weather prevented many sorties, by his personal example and
enthusiasm he kept the squadron morale at a high level.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GOODYEAR, H. C. C. 110281. Please refer to page 271 and note the following· FIL. Goodyear was from Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Gander, Newfoundland. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
GORDON, W. C. Jl6260//R83581. Please refer to page 266 and note the following -PIO Gordon was 30 years old at time of death, not 22. GORDON, P/O William Campbell (Jl6260) -Distingttished Flying Cross• No.101 Squadron – Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Born in Owen Sound, Ontario, 1913; home there. Enlisted in Toronto, 22 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 26 July 1941 ), No.5 BGS (graduated 4 August 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 21 June 1941), and No. I CNS (graduated 1 September 1941). Commissioned 1942. The citation reads • “Throughout his operational sorties with this squadron this officer has proved himself to be a very detemuned and skillfuJ navigator who has displayed
commendable courage and resource in hazardous
circumstances. In August 1942 he was one of a crew
whose aircraft was forced down at sea following an attack by enemy fighters. After eleven hours in the dinghy they were eventually rescued, though Pilot Officer Gordon was injured. On another occasion while on a sortie to Essen
this officer’s aircraft was badly damaged by night
fighters. The rear gunner was killed and another member of the crew wounded. Throughout all these perilous
experiences, however, Pilot Officer Gordon has combined tenacity with endurance and displayed skill worthy of high praise.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GOSLWG, L. C. J9359. Please refer to page 266 and
note the following -GOSLING, F/O Leslie Cyril (19359) • Distinguished Flying Cross -No.229 Squadron• Award
effective 16 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 18
June 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. Born at Battleford, Saskatchewan, 5 October 1920.
Enlisted in Saskatoon, 24 April 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 August 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 25
September 1941 ), and No. 7 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941 ). Arrived overseas, 21 January 1942. Further trained at No.17 (P) AFU and No.53 OTU. To No.222 Squadron, 9 June 1942 and No.229 Squadron, 21 October 1942.
Killed in action 19 July 1943. The citation reads• “This officer bas completed a very large number of sorties
including attacks on airfields, port installations and
industrial targets. In air combat he has destroyed four
enemy aircraft and damaged others. In one engagement he shot down two Junkers 88 which were escorting two
merchant vessels. This officer has displayed great skill
and keenness, setting a fine example.” GOSLING, FIL
Leslie Cyril, DFC (19359) -Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross• No.229 Squadron -Award effective 18 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 17 August 1943 and AFRO 2005/dated 1 October 1943. The citation reads -“This
officer bas taken pan in a very large number of sorties in the Middle East and in recent operations over Sicily. He has fought with great skill and detennination and within a short period has shot down five enemy aircraft. Flight
Lieutenant Gosling has led his flight and at times the
squadron with great ability. He bas destroyed nine hostile aircraft.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans,
Ontario.
GOUDY, C.M. Rl39157. Please referto page 273 and note the following. Sgt. Goudy was 25 at the time of his
death, Sgt. A. Cuthbertson (RAF) was the other member of the crew to be killed. F/O. J. Hall (RAF), Sgt.s A. Morley (RAF), J.T. Williams (RAF), J. Whiteley (RAF), and P/O. R.A. Black-well (RAF) were all safe. Sgt. Goudy was
awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal effective 13 July 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO
1949/43 dated 24 September 1943. Born in 1918 in Galt, Ontario: home in Campbellford, Ontario. Fonner soldier; enlisted in Hantllton, 7 November 1941. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 20 November 1942). Cited with F/O John Hall, RAF (awarded DFC). The citation reads -“One night in July 1943, Flying Officer Hall and Sergeant Goudy were captain and rear gunner respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. When nearing the t.arget area the bomber was intercepted by an enemy fighter but Flying Officer Hall evaded it. A few minutes later the aircraft was illuminated by a cone of searchlights and hit by anti-aircraft fire but Flying Officer Hall held to his course and pressed home his attack. Almost immediately the bomber was hit by gun fire from an enemy fighter and sustained severe damage. Skilful evading action enabled Flying Officer Hall to fly clear of the defenses and course was set for base. At the beginning of the action Sergeant Goudy was seriously wounded,
sustaining a fracture of the hip bone and pelvis, splinters of which pierced organs in his abdomen. In spite of this,
Sergeant Goudy refrained from infonning his captain of his injuries until another wounded comrade had received
attention. During the return flight be remained constantly alert to the possibility of enemy interferences and gave
reassuring replies to his captain’s repeated inquiries as to his welfare. On reaching the English coast morphia had to be administered to him as bis pains from his injuries were unendurable. Flying Officer Hall succeeded in reaching an airfield where he landed without the assistance of flaps. In the face of a trying ordeal he displayed outstanding skill, courage and detennination while Sergeant Goudy’s
indontltable spirit, fortitude and tenacity were worthy of
the highest praise.” Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario. GRANGE, E.A.M. JI 843 I. Please refer to page 275 and change aircraft type to Lancaster# JA 675 crashed at Crucey, Eure-et-Loir, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
GRANT, C.D. 15807. Please refer to page 276 and change the spelling to Mississagua from Mississuaga. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
GRANT, D.M. 15982. Please refer to page 276 and note the following. FIL. Grant was from Calgary, Alberta. Detail provided by H.E. Buchanan, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
GRANT, D. M. 15983. Please refer to page 276 and note the following – FIL Grant was from Trenton, Ontario, not Ottawa. GRANT, F/O Duncan Marshall (15982) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.400 Squadron – Award effective 19 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Born in High River, Alberta, 8 April 1922; home in Trenton. Corporal in Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 1938. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 12 September 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.IS EFTS
(graduated 28 March 1941 ), and No.11 SFTS (graduated 14 June 1941. Arrived overseas, 19 July 1941; posted to No.400 Squadron 3 August 1941. Killed in action (flak), 27 September 1943. The citation reads – “Flying Officer Grant has taken part in many operational sorties, during which he has personally destroyed one enemy aircraft and damaged eighteen locomotives. At all times he has displayed a fine fighting spirit and great determination, setting a magnificent example.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GRA YELL. K. M. R97644. Please refer to page 278 and note the following · GRA YELL, LAC Karl Mander
(R97644) – George Cross – No.2 Wireless School – Awarded 11 June 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942. Born in Norkkoping, Sweden, 24 September 1922. Educated in Sweden to 1936; at Kitsilano High School, 1937-1939; at King Edward High School, 1939-1940. Enlisted in Vancouver, 15 March 1941. Posted to No.2 Manning Depot that day as AC2; to No.12 SFTS, Brandon, 16 May I 941 (guard duty); to No.2 Wireless School, 19 July 1941. Promoted to LAC, 18 August 1941. Not the most disciplined pupil; on 3 July 1941 he forfeited seven days pay; on 5 September 1941 he was awarded 120 hours detention. Mrs. Francis Walsh, Big Springs School, Calgary, awarded George Medal for efforts to save Gravell. The citation is also shown on page 278 Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GRAY, R. B. 113979. Please refer to page 279 and note the following – GRAY, F/0 Roderick Borden (113979)­Mention in Despatches – No.172 Squadron (deceased)­Award effective I January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, 2 October 1917. Educated there 10 June 1937, then worked for CPR as freight trucker until enlistment. Joined Canadian Anny, 13 July 1940, transferring to RCAF, 21 October 1941. Trained at No.I ITS (4 January to 26 February 1942), No.5 AOS (27 February to 5 June 1942), No.7 BGS (6 June to 24 July 1942), No. l CNS (25 July to 24 September 1942) and No.I GRS (25 September to 6 November 1942). Arrived in UK, 30 November 1942. Crewed at No.3 OTU (30 March to 1 June 1943). No.172 Squadron, 2 June 1943 until he was killed in action, 27 August 1944. AC2 on 21 October
1941, promoted to LAC, 27 February 1942, Sgt and PIO, 5 September 1942, F/0 5 March 1943. The citation to the George Cross is shown on page 279. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
GREGOIRE, L. J. R. 187391. Please refer to page 282 and note the following – F/0 Gregoire was 25 years old at time of death, not 22. GREGOIRE, F/O Leo Joseph Robert (187391) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.153 Squadron (missing) – Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 194 5 and AFRO 824/4 5 dated 18 May 1945. Born 1920 in Aye Hill, Alberta; home in Vancouver (plumber’s assistant). Enlisted in Calgary, 16 September 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 30 April 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 25 June 1943) and No.3 SITS (graduated 15 October 1943). Commissioned June 1944. Killed in action, 3/4 March 1945 {Lancaster LM750); name on Runnymede Memorial. No citation other than “completed … numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty.” Public Records Office Air 2/9060 has recommendation dated 15 January 1945 (but when updated after that date) stating he had flown 26 sorties (149 hours), 5 September 1944 to 28 January 1945. The sorties are; 5 Sept 44 Le Havre
18 Nov 44 Wanne Eicke! IO Sep 44 Le Havre 27 Nov 44 Freiburg 29 Nov 44 Dortmund
12 Sep 44 Frankfurt 3 Dec 44 Urft Dam 6 Dec 44 Leuna 22 Dec 44 Coblen
23 Sep 44 Neuss
25 Sep 44 Calais
28 Sep 44 Calais 27 Dec 44 Rheydt 28 Dec 44 Bonn
5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken 11 Oct 44 Fort Frederick 5 Jan 45 Royan
14 Oct 44 Duisburg 7 Jan 45 Munich 14 Jan 45 Leuna 16 Jan 45 Zeitz
28 Oct 44 Cologne
30 Oct 44 Cologne 28 Jan 45 Stuttgart
4 Nov 44 Bochum 6 Nov 44 Gelsenkirchen
This Canadian captain of aircraft has now completed 26 sorties against targets in Germany and occupied territory. Throughout his tour he has pressed home his attacks with the utmost skill and determination in the face of heavy anti-aircraft fire. He has shown a complete disregard for his own personal safety and his cheerful confidence has inspired a high standard of morale in his crew. His commendable courage and high devotion to duty make him well worthy of the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. HACKETT, D. 122541. Please refer to page 289 and note the following – FIO Hackett was 24 years old at time of death, not 22. HACKETT, FIO Douglas (J22541)­Distinguished Flying Cross – No.424 Squadron – Award effective 20 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated I October 1943 and AFRO 2258143 dated 5 November 1943. Born in Kingston, Ontario, 1920; home there;enlisted in Ottawa, 15 May 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 1 September 1941 ), No.4 EFTS (graduated 25 October 1941), No.9 SFTS (ceased training 24 November 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 23 May 1942), No.4 AOS (graduated 11 April 1942) and No. I CNS (graduated 3 July 1942. Commissioned 1942. The citation reads – “Throughout his tour of operations this officer has displayed great efficiency as bomb aimer. He has completed a number of successful sorties, some of them attacks on highly fortified centres in Germany and has spared no pains to improve his skill, attaining a high standard of accuracy in bombing which has contributed much to the success achieved by his crew.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
HAINES, V. Y. Cl 322. Please refer to page 291 and note the following – FIL. Haines was 27 years old at the time of death, not 25. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
HALEY, W. ST. 188320. With reference to page 292 the crew member shown as wiknown is FIO. T.J.A. McFadden (RAF). McFadden is buried in the same cemetery as Haley. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
HALL, W.T. R54012. Please refer to page 294 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when the Whitley aircraft went missing during a raid against Hamburg. PIO. R.J.A. Cleverdon, Sgt.s A.F.C. Couch
(RAF), W. Lowe (RAF), and FIO. Simpson (RAF) were also killed. The complete crew are listed on the Rwinymede War Memorial. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
HALL, W. C. J897301/Rl48988. Please refer to page 294 and note the following – PIO. Hall was 23 years old at the time of death, not 20. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
HALLIDAY, F. 110696. Please refer to page 294 and note the following – FIL Halliday was from North bay, Ontario, not Toronto, Ontario.HALLIDAY, FIL Francis
(J 10696)- Mention in Despatches – No.53 Squadron
(deceased) -Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874144 dated 21 April 1944. Home in North Bay, Ontario. Enlisted in Hamilton, 20 May 1941. Trained at No.4 AOS (graduated 5 January 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 14 February 1942) and No.2 ANS (graduated 16 March 1942). Killed in action 21 November 1943 (LiberatorBZ819); name on Runnymede Memorial. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. HANNAH, H. A. 128186. Please refer to page 299 and note the following – HANNAH, FIO Harold Allan (128186) – Croix de Guerre (France) – No.405 Squadron (AFROgives unit only as Overseas ) – Awarded as per AFRO 1619145 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Moose Lake, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Regina, 11 November 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 June 1941 ), No.17 EFTS (graduated 26 July 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 10 October 1941). Public Records Office Air 219645 has citation which reads – “Flying Officer Hannah is a pilot and captain of aircraft who has participated in many successful air attacks during the Battle of France. Throughout this time, Flying Officer Hannah displayed great heroism and devotion to duty. By his courage and skill, displayed in pressing home all his attacks, he exhibited his maximum effort to ensure that the Allied landing forces received the air support so necessary to the success of their landings. This officer has shown a fine fighting spirit and his patriotic considerations are in keeping with the highest traditions of the service.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
HANSON, J.R. Jl5599. Please refer to page 300 and note the following. There were nine ainnen in this aircraft. As well as the six Canadians previously identified the three members of the RAF are FIO.s P.M. Hughes, W.G. Philpott, and PIO. M. Henderson. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
HANSON, J. R. J15599. Please refer to page 300 and note the following- HANSON, FIL James Robert (115599) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No. 408 Squadron
(deceased)- Award effective 10 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 23 May and AFRO 1380144 dated 30 June 1944. Born in England, 1918; educated in Montreal. Enlisted in Montreal, 15 April 1940. Wife in Montreal. Trained at No.4 BGS (graduated 23 October 1940) and No. I WS (graduated 24 November 1940). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than … “completed … many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Killed in action 22/23 May 1944 (Lancaster LL 723); name on Runnymede Memorial. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
HANWAY, J. A. J5986. Please refer to page 300 and note the following – SIL Hanway was from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, not Halifax, Nova Scotia. HANWAY, SIL James Albert (15986) – Air Force Cross – No.5 METS
(AFRO gives unit as RCAF Repatriation Depot Overseas) – Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 809144 dated 14 April 1944. Home in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. Enlisted at Moncton, 14
August 1940. Trained at No. I ITS (graduated 24 January 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 5 March 1941), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 3 July 1941). No citation in Canadian sources. Public Records Office Air 218959 has recommendation which also identifies unit.-nus officer has been an instructor on Beaufort aircraft and since his arrival at the school 120 Beaufort pilots have completed the course. Flight Lieutenant Hanway has carried out over 400 hours on Beaufort torpedo bomber instruction, most of the flying being performed at 60 feet above sea level. Since December 1942 he has taken over the instruction on Marauder aircraft and during a period of three months 32 Marauder pilots completed a course under his instruction. It has been entirely due to his skill and courage as an instructor d1at many torpedo pilots have gained confidence in their aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Hanway has displayed fine ability as a pilot.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.HARRISON, J.R. 121448. Please refer to page 305 and note the following. The aircraft was returning from a daylight raid when it crashed. Sgt. D.L. Whitbread (RAF) died of bis injuries the following day. The five remaining crew members were injured. Master K. Battersby (a civilian) was killed and Mrs. 0. Poineau (a civilian) injured. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
HARRISON, G.E. ,37012, Please refer to page 305 and note the followiug. The crew of Stirling aircraft# LJ 982 and Stirling aircraft # LJ 943 have not been identified correctly. When LJ 982 crashed at Doorworth, the complete crew of W/C. G.E. Harrison (R.A.F.) see page 305, PIO. J.F.G. DeCordoue (R.C.A.F.) see page 175, WO. J.B. Brierly (R.N.Z.A.F.), WO. D.M. Madlewson
(R..N.Z.A.F.), F/O. N. McKay ( R.A.F.), FIL. N.E. Skinner (R.A.F.), FS. R. Percey (R.A.F.), UCpl. L.H. Caldecon, and Driver H. Gregory were all killed. For the correct Detail regarding LJ 943 please see Antoft O.H. Detail provided by Bob Middleton ofKillamey, Manitoba.
HEBENTON, L.A. J88403/R194486 Please refer to page 313 and note dle following: R.A.F. Sgt. Reginald W. Bodsworth was also killed. At 12:50 pm on Sunday, 20th February, 1994 – the exact time of the crash in 1944 – about 50 people gadlered on dle hillside in a slightly drizzling rain for die unveiling and dedication of the memorial to tlle two airmen who lost dleir lives in the service of dieir country. The silver memorial plate has been erected on dle wall of one of the buildings on Mr. Lunny’s fannyard close to where the stricken, burning plane came to rest. Mr. Irving joined dle RAF in 1943, was posted as a flight engineer, and was a crew member of the ill-fated aircraft. Mr. Irving explained what happened. On Sunday morning 20t11 of February, 1944 the Sunderland took off on a training affiliation with twin engined Beaufighters from St. Angelo airfield. “We were using camera-guns,” Mr. Irving explained. “We were taking evasion action in a mock battle, maneuvering to avoid die Beaufighter.” Each
ai.rcraft was acting the role of “target” for the oilier during tlle training exercise in low-level flying. The pilot of the heavy Sunderland was trying to gain some extra speed by putting dle seaplane into a dive as they were approaching Trory. ”He bit a tree first and banged into the power cables.” said Mr. Irving. “This set dle aircraft on fire. I remember us hitting tlle laneway. Debris was flying everywhere. The field was covered by bits and pieces of the engines. We ended up against a tree. TI1e bull was blazing. The arnmunition was exploding all the time. Out of the crew of ten, two lost their lives. The odlers escaped witll injuries, largely through tlle brave action of a local fanner, Mr. William Lunny, who ran with a hatchet, chopped a hole in the fuselage of dle burning aircraft and helped the crew out. Detail provided by K.C. Ingram, Oakville, Ontario. HENFREY, J. Rl19823. Please refer to page 317 and note the following. The aircraft flew into a hillside at Tewitt Hall Wood above Oakworth. A stone unveiled recently in West Yorkshire was the work of die Oakworth Village Society, helped by a generous donation from an anonymous villager. Under dle RCAF badge are the names of the sbc crew, all Canadians, who were killed in the crash. The memorial at the isolated crash site was dedicated on 4 July 1993 at a service attended by more than 500 people. Keighley Squadron, ATC, personnel from RAF Leeming and officers from The Canadian Armed Forces were present and a BBMF Spitfire made several low passes. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
HENINGER, H.F. JI 6209. Please refer to page 317 and add to the burial location, Grandcoun, Oise, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
HENRY, J.M. RI06552. Please refer to page 317 and note tlle following. The crew of Han1pden aircraft X43 l 8 were on a nigl1t cross country training flight when tlle pilot descended through cloud and the aircraft struck a hill. Sgt.s J.M. Churchill and R.O. Lumgair were injured. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
HINDMARSH, F.C. 189248. Please refer to page 325 and note the following. The crew were engaged in ground to air firing when one of dle engines failed. The aircraft went out of control at 50 feet, stalled crashed and burst into flan1es. Detail provided by David E. Thompson. Middlesborough, England.
HOFFMAN, T .R. 194 70. Please refer to page 329 and note the following. The correct spelling is W.E. Hogan. Aircraft# JB 956-0. Also killed were Sgt.s W. Brown
(RAF) and E.T. Barry (RAF). Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
HOGG, D.A. 121352. Please refer to page 330 and note tlle following. Halifax JD325 was one of 262 allied bomber aircraft dispatched on operations to Frankfurt on tlle night of 25t11-26th November 1943. She failed to return having been shot down in flames, crashing near dle town of Carignan in Nonnandy. The aircraft was seen on fire over tlle town, had circled and tried to land, and finally crashed on the top of tlle hill. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
HOOD, W. A. R 104231. Please refer to page 334 and note dle following – FS. Hood was from Bras D’Or, Nova Scotia, Bradsor, Nova Scotia. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
HOOKEY, J.P. ,798613, Please refer to page 334: After Hooker, E.M. dle following is added Detail: HOOKEY, JOSEPH PATRICK SGT(WAG) 798613 – Royal Air Force. From St. Johns, Newfoundland. Killed Sept. 25/42 age 26. #24 Operational Training Unit. Whitley aircraft # BD232 was on a cross-country training flight and was last beard from nearing the Irish Sea. An air-sea rescue search was initiated as well as a search over dle high ground of North Wales. On dle 27th improved visibility allowed an aircraft from Llanwrog to locate ilie burned out wreckage in dle Camedds. A search party from was sent from Llanwrog and the bodies ofdle five crew recovered. TI1e crash sit is a few hundred yards NE ofLlyn Dulyn.
Sgt.s Stuart (RNZAF), Smith (RAF), Hughes (RAF), and Hassell (RAF) were also killed. Sergeant Wireless Operator Air Gunner Hookey is buried in the Caernarvon Cemetery, Caemarvonshire, Wales. Detail provided by S.J. Hookey, Brighton, Ontario. HORNER, D.C. JI 7468. Please refer to page 336 and change crew list to include PIO. J. Denholm (RAF), and F/O. P.R. Quance (RAAF). Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
HUME, R.G. RI 16029. Please refer to page 343 and add the following. The squadron was based at Elvington when Halifax aircraft# HR 714-K failed to return from night
operations over Stettin. The seventh member of the crew killed was Sgt. A.P. Deighton (RAF). This complete crew are all buried in the same cemetery. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. INGALLS, B.J. FIL. JI 7096. Please refer to page 350 and
note the following• FIL Ingalls was from Sayabec, Quebec, not from Dannville. INGALLS, FIL Bruce Johnston
(JI 7096) • Distinguished Flying Cross• No.72 Squadron• Award effective 15 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1944 and AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944.
Born in Sayabec, Quebec, 26 June 192 l; home there.
Educated in Danville, Quebec. Enlisted in Montreal, 11
July I 941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 26 October
1941), No.13 EFTS (graduated 21 December 1941) and
No.13 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Arrived in UK, 12 May 1941. With No.402 Squadron 6 October 1942 to 5 May 1943, to North Africa, May 1943. No.72 Squadron, 12 May 1943 to 4 March 1944. Commissioned l 943. No.417 Squadron 4 March 1944 to 16 June 1944. Killed in action (flak). Flight Lieutenant Ingalls joined this squadron in
Malta and flew many sorties during the invasion of Sicily, subsequently he took part in the Salemo operations and
has been flying with the squadron on all occasions during the Italian campaign. On many occasions it has been due to this officer’s accurate reporting of the presence of enemy aircraft that his squadron has been able to engage them.
He has destroyed at least five enemy aircraft and damaged others. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. IVES, J.L. R62735. Please refer to page 352 and note the following• IVES, FS John Learned (R62735) • Mention in Despatches• No.51 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as
“Overseas”) -Award effective I January 1943 as per
London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Enlisted in Sherbrooke, Quebec, 23 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 1 October 1940), No.2 AOS (graduated 17 January 1941), No.2 BGS
(graduated 3 March 1941) and No. I ANS (graduated 5
April 1941). DHist file 181.009 D.1636 (RG.24
Vol.20604) has application for Operational Wings dated 14 February 1944. Claimed to have flown 29 sorties (160
operational hours) with No.51 Squadron, June 1941 to
March 1942. Shot down over enemy territory, September 1941 [sic; see below]; evaded and returned to UK after five months. Instructed at No.32 OTU in 1943. Later
commissioned (192827) and killed on operations 28 April 1945 with No.271 Squadron (Dakota KG406); name on
Runnymede Memorial. Public Records Office Air 2/5684 has recommendation and identifies unit. TI1is ainnan was a member of the crew of an aircraft which bombed Cologne on 18th August 1941. He was compel led to bale out near Maastricbt. Immediately he landed he hid in a wood to
avoid capture and remained there for four days. He drank some water in a field which gave him fever and he was
later found by a farmer and taken to the fannhouse. On
28th August he made his way, alone, to Brussels. Here he lived until 6th November when he left with a guide and
two companions. They were escorted across the
Franco-Belgian frontier and then made their way alone and left the Zone Interdite on 6th November. Traveling via
Paris and Bayonne they reached the Spanish frontier on
10th November. He was repatriated from Gibraltar on
30th November 1941. Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario. IVES, J.L. R62735. Please refer to page 352 and note the following• IVES, FS John Learned (R62735) • Mention in Despatches• No.51 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as
“Overseas”) -Award effective I January 1943 as per
London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Enlisted in Sherbrooke, Quebec, 23 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 1 October 1940), No.2 AOS (graduated 17 January 1941), No.2 BGS
(graduated 3 March 1941) and No. I ANS (graduated 5
April 1941). DHist file 181.009 D.1636 (RG.24
Vol.20604) has application for Operational Wings dated 14 February 1944. Claimed to have flown 29 sorties (160
operational hours) with No.51 Squadron, June 1941 to
March 1942. Shot down over enemy territory, September 1941 [sic; see below]; evaded and returned to UK after five months. Instructed at No.32 OTU in 1943. Later
commissioned (192827) and killed on operations 28 April 1945 with No.271 Squadron (Dakota KG406); name on
Runnymede Memorial. Public Records Office Air 2/5684 has recommendation and identifies unit. TI1is ainnan was a member of the crew of an aircraft which bombed Cologne on 18th August 1941. He was compel led to bale out near Maastricbt. Immediately he landed he hid in a wood to
avoid capture and remained there for four days. He drank some water in a field which gave him fever and he was
later found by a farmer and taken to the fannhouse. On
28th August he made his way, alone, to Brussels. Here he lived until 6th November when he left with a guide and
two companions. They were escorted across the
Franco-Belgian frontier and then made their way alone and left the Zone Interdite on 6th November. Traveling via
Paris and Bayonne they reached the Spanish frontier on
10th November. He was repatriated from Gibraltar on
30th November 1941. Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario. JOHNSON, H.C. Rl78928. Please refer to page 363 and add the following Detail. Two aircraft from this squadron crashed in the same area on the same date, the crew names per aircraft are believed to be as follows. FS.s H.C. Johnson, L.S. Bryan (RAF), W.G. Woods (RAF), Sgt.s
R.W. Davis (RAF), C.A.C. Le Mee-Power (RAF), R. Stewart (RAF), and W.E. Woodbine (RAF) were all killed when Halifax# LK784 crashed near Faverolles,
Eure-et-Loir, France. W/O. J.O. Page, FS. E. Bryan (RAF), Sgt.s G.N. Clithero (RAF), J.W. Golder (RAF), E. Tonge (RAF), G.R. Whittle (RAF), and P/O. A.J. Innes (RAF) were all killed when Halifax aircraft# LK783 crashed near Treon, Eure-et-Loir, France. All of these airmen were buried in the Communal Cemetery at Dreux, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
JOWETT, W. R62654. Please refer to page 372 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft # Z 9226-K went missing during operations to Dusseldorf. P/O.s A.D. Scott-Martin (RAF), J.N. Chisholm (RAF), Sgt.s S.G. Thompson (RAF), and P.G. Clark (RAF) were also killed. This complete crew is buried in graves l.C.12 to l.C.16 at Rheinberg. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. KENNY, S. R. Please refer to page 383 and note the following – Radio Officer Kenny was from Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Wolfeville, Nova Scotia. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
KILLIN, R. D. R65229. Please refer to page 387 and note the following – Sgt. Killin was from Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Halifax. Detail provided by D.A Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
KLERSY, W. T. JI 2199. Please refer to page 392 and note the following – SIL. Klersy was on a day training flight when he lost his life, he was not killed in action. He was from Brantford, Ontario, not Toronto, Ontario. KLERSY, F/O William Tiiomas (112199) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.401 Squadron – Award effective 5
September 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born in Brantford, Ontario, 30 July 1922. Enlisted in Toronto, 28 June 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (11 October to 6 December
1941), No.20 EFTS (7 December 1941 to 28 February 1942) and No.6 SFTS (1 March to 4 July 1942. Retained in Canada for home defense duties (No. 130
Squadron). Arrived in UK, I July 1943. No.401 Squadron, 9 July 1943 to 17 September 1944 and again r
f om 3 January to 22 May 1945; Killed in flying accident,
22 May 1945. Aerial victories as follows: 7 March 1944, one FW-190 destroyed; 7 June 1944, one FW-190
destroyed; 28 June 1944, two FW-190s destroyed; 2 July 1944, one Bf. I 09 destroyed east of Caen; 13 July 1944, one FW-190 destroyed southeast of Caen; 17 July 1944, one Do.217 destroyed, northwest of Caen; 31 July I 944, one FW-190 destroyed, Domfort; 12 January 1945, one Ar.234 damaged plus one Ar.234 damaged with eleven others, Osnabruck; J March 1945, one FW-190 destroyed, Dorsten plus two Bf.109s destroyed; 19 April 1945, one FW-190 destroyed, Hagenow; 20 April 1945, two FW-190s destroyed plus one Bf. I 09 destroyed plus one Bf. I 09 destroyed with another pilot; I May 1945, one FW-190 damaged; 3 May 1945, one Ju.52 destroyed on the ground plus one He.111 destroyed on the ground. All awards presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947. For additional details see H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky. The citation reads – ”This officer has displayed the greatest keenness for operations. He has participated in a large number of sorties, on many of which he has led the flight with distinction. He is most determined fighter and has shot down three enemy aircraft.” KLERSY, FIL William Thomas, DFC (]12199) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.401 Squadron – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Toe citation reads – “This officer is a keen and courageous fighter. He has completed a large number of sorties and his successes include the destruction of seven enemy aircraft and many mechanical vehicles. His example of detennination and devotion to duty has been of a high order.” KLERSY, SIL William Tiiomas, DFC
(JI 2199) – Distinguished Service Order – No.40 I Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 20 June 1945 as per London Gazette dated 29 June 1945 and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. The citation reads- “Throughout two tours Squadron Leader Klersy has displayed outstanding leadership, courage and devotion to duty. Since the award of a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross he has destroyed or damaged a furtl1er ninety enemy vehicles, eight locomotives and eight good trucks. He has also destroyed three more enemy aircraft bringing his total to at least ten enemy aircraft destroyed. This officer has moulded his squadron into a powerful operational unit that by maintaining a consistently high standard in every phase of ground or air activity has set a magnificenl example to the rest of the wing.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario, and Judge W. Durham, Waterloo, Ontario.
KNUTSON, V.H. R98799. Please refer to page 393 and note the following. The crew of LA 995 were lost during a navigation and fuel consumption test, the first turning point was the island of St. Ki Ida. The aircraft was last seen flying very low in mist and rain near the island ofBoreray and about the same time a signal was received at Stornoway reporting that all was correct. Tiiis was the last that was heard from the Wellington. An intensive search was carried out but nothing was found. On March 2nd. the body of tl1e rear gunner, Sgt. Alston, was found washed up on the west coast of Lewis, and it was assumed that the aircraft had come down in the sea. In 1978 the wreckage of a Wellington aircraft was found on the island of Soay. All the evidence points to the wreckage as being that of LA 995. Tiie RAF members of the crew of LA 995 who were also killed are; Sgt.s R. Spencer, G. Stewert, G. Turley, W. day, and W. Alston. This group of islands is known as St. Kilda and are located in the North Atlantic about fifty miles west of the Outer Hebrides. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England. LAMBERT, M.A. R70699. Please refer to page 430 and note the following. Sgt. Lambert was 24 years old at the time of his death. Detail provided by T.M. Lambert, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.
LANTZ, G. M. R65194. Please refer to page 405 and note the following – FS. Lantz was from Port Williams, Nova Scotia, not Port William. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
LATTA, J.B. ,42008, Please refer to page 407 and add Hurricane aircraft # V 7203. Detail from “Pegboard” the official bulletin of 500 Wing, A.F.A.C., Winnipeg, Manitoba.
LAV ALLEE, J.P. Jl 0983. Please refer to page 408 and note the following. In the early morning of 18 January 1944 Halifax L W334 took off from its base at RAF Topcliffe on a cross country training flight. The crew comprised young Canadians under training to become a fully fledged bomber crew with much still to learn. As the aircraft lumbered north into the murky Vale of York the six wide eyed and eager to learn airmen adjusted their positions and got down to the job in hand. The weather had not been good all week. Low cloud had hampered flying training and crews had been instructed not to descend below three thousand feet if the ground was not visible. At 10.30 hours LW334 struck the southern tip of the Black Hambleton Hills, near Osmotherley, at eleven hundred feet in fog. The crew of six were killed. A memorial dedication was held on Tuesday 18 January 1994 to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of this tragic event. A wooden memorial cross and descriptive plaque was blessed by the local parish priest the Reverand Stuart East at 10.30 hours. The plaque inscription reads:- TIIlS MEMORIAL CROSS IS DEDICATED TO THE SIX ROY AL CANADIAN AIR FORCE AIRMEN WHO LOST THEIR LIVES HERE ON 18 JANUARY 1944. THEIR AVERAGE AGE WAS JUST 23 YEARS. HANDLEY PAGE HALIFAX B2 LW334 1659 HCU RAF TOPCLIFFE. COMORATED ON nns FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THEIR DEATH 18 JANUARY 1944. “TAKE NOTHING BUT PHOTOGRAPHS”
”LEA VE NOTHING BUT FOOTPRINTS” 110933 F/O JOSEPH P LAV ALEE – PILOT; 120970 F/O WILFRED L BOISVERT- NAVIGATOR; J23210 F/O WALTER PHILLIPS – BOMB AIMER; Rl 11125 WO2 GEORGE E GIFF – WIRELESS OPERATOR AIR GUNNER; Rl87271 SGT GUY H HIVON – AIR GUNNER; R54 l 30 SGT RICHARD G KIMBALL – FLIGHT ENGINEER.
As the location of this memorial is on private property permission to erect the cross and hold a ceremony was saught and willingly given by Lord Pollington, The Earl of Mexeborough. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England. LEBLANC, E. J. R77455. Please refer to page 414 and note the following – FS. LeBlanc was from St. Joseph De Moine, Nova Scotia, not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
LECKIE, R.C. J28502. Please refer to page 415 and note the following. The RAF members of the crew killed were Sgt.s R. Thomas, D. Armstrong, and C. Fieldhouse.
LEWIS, J.E. Rl 39405. Please refer to page 423 and change crew list to read Sgt.s G.W. Rockwood (RAF),
W.G. Brown (RAF), W.J. McKay (RAF), Nash (RAF), J. Sutcliffe (RAF), and J. Watson (RAF) were also killed. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
LONIB, J.M. 185164. Please refer to page 432 and add to crew list P/O. E.T. Fisher (RAF) and Sgt. E. Money
(RAF). This crew list is now complete. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
LOWE, A.R. 129556. Please refer to page 435 and note the following. On Sunday March 5, 1995 at 11.00 a.m. a Service of Dedication of a Memorial to members of the crew of Halifax Bomber MZ 454 commemorating the 50th Anniversary was held at Holy Trinity Church, Little Ousebum. Following the service the memorial was unveiled by the Canadian Air Advisor, Colonel J David, O.M.M., C.D. and dedicated by The Bishop of Ripon, 1l1e Rt Revd D de Lorentz Young, M.A. (Ox). The three members of the crew who survived are F/O.s E.S. Brabbins, J.C. Brownell, and FS. K.J.S. Mccuaig. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
LUKEY, F.H. ,1288699, Please refer to page 437, Sgt. Lukey was not a Canadian. Shortly after the war his parents moved to British Columbia and this new home location was engraved on the Runnymede Memorial. Detail provided by Sgt. Lukey’s sister, Pauline Lukey, Victoria, British Columbia. MACAULAY, T. H. R. J220981/R50164. Please refer to page 441 and note the following – F/L. Macaulay was from New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, not Winnipeg, and was with #424 Squadron at the time of his death. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACDONALD, A. 122384. Please refer to page 442 the burial location is Eure et Loir. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
MACDONALD, R.E. Rl31442. Please refer to page 445 and add the following. The squadron was based at Elvington when Halifax aircraft# JB 863-V crashed just after take off for operations over Le Creusot, France. The six RAF members of the crew who were also killed were; FS.s N.R. Holledge buried in Homchurch, W. Cooke buried in Windsor, Sgt.s A.H. Gurry buried in Ilford, F. Danby buried in Liverpool, D.H. Clinch buried in Caerphilly, and FIO. A.W.S. Young buried in Wembley. This completes this crew list. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MACDONALD, 1. C. R76227. Please refer to page 444 and note the following – WO. MacDonald was from Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia, not Montreal. Detail provided by
D.A Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACDONALD, H. A R76219. Please refer to page 443 and note the following – FS. MacDonald was from Trenton, Nova Scotia, not New Glasgow. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACDONALD, R. G. Rl24691 Please refer to page 445 and note the following – FS. MacDonald was from Orangedale, Nova Scotia, not Vancouver. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACFARLANE, D.W. R88370. Please refer to page 446 and add the following. The squadron was based at Elvington when Halifax aircraft# JB 837-D was lost during night operations to Dusseldorf. The five RAF members of the crew who were also killed were; Sgt.s R. Lewis, W.R.L. Codd, J.H. Waterston, J.W. Richardson, and J. Kershaw. This completes this crew list. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MACKAY, A.D. 186152. Please refer to page 448 and change Extenson to Extension, Siene to Seine. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
MACKENNA, W.F. Rl53207. Please refer to page 449 and note the following. The aircraft crashed at Merouvel in the town of L’Aigle, Orne. The burial site is at Orne not Manche. The three of the crew originally not accounted for are: Sgt. W. Bilton (RAF) was an Evadee through the French Underground, FIL. S. Stapley (RAF), and Sgt. L. Haydn (RAF) were taken Prisoners Of War. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France MACKENZIE, M. D. Jl 5383. Please refer to page 450 and note the following – PIO. MacKenzie was 21 years old at the time of death, not 25. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACLEOD, J. M. C4169. Please refer to page 453 and note the following – Nursing Macleod was 29 years old at the time of death, not 39. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MACLEOD, M. H. 119856. Please refer to page 454 and note the following – PIO. MacLeod was from Loch Lomond, Nova Scotia, not Sussex, New Brunswick. Detail provided by D.A Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MAGLADRY, H.E. R74322. Please refer to page 458 and note the following. The RAF crew members also killed were FS. R.E. Pithers, PIO. G.G. Jeary, Sgt.s J. Mainwaring, and W.M. Watson. Detail provided by David E. TI1ompson, Middlesborough, England.
MANSFIELD, R.G. 185770. Please refer to page 463 and note the following. On 19 June 1994 a special plaque was dedicated and a maple tree was planted as a memorial to the crew of.KB 875. The plaque was sited on the church wall adjoining the village memorial. This took place in the village of Sedgefield and the service was conducted at the St. Edmund’s Parish Church. The Roll of Honour on the plaque reads: On 24th November 1944, the crew of a Lancaster Bomber of number 419 Moose Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, Middleton St. George, paid the SUPREME SACRIFICE. This plaque is dedicated to those who lost their lives – Pit Off Richard Mansfield DFC Ottawa, Canada; FS Douglas Gunn Toronto, Canada; FS George Warren-Darley Toronto, Canada; Fg Off Allan Hirst Vancouver, Canada; FS John Murphy Detroit, USA; FS Leslie Toth Kipling, Canada; Sgt Derrick Newland London, England. LEST WE FORGET. Detail provided by David E. TI1ompson, Middlesborough, England.
MARTELL, C. E. Rl04349. Please refer to page 466 and note the following – LAC Martell was from
Main-A-Dieu, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MARTIN, J. J.B. 123593. Please refer to page 468 and note the following – PIO. Martin was from Lourdes, Nova Scotia, not New Glasgow. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MA1HESON, R.J. J201791/Rl21695. Please refer to page 4 71 and note the following. When LJ 829 crashed at Doorworth, the complete crew of Sgt. E.F. Keen (R.A.F.) FIO. R.J. Matheson (R.C.A.F.), PIO. R.A. Davies
(R.A.A.F.), PIO. K. Willett, (R.A.A.F.), WO. D.L. Brouse
( R.C.A.F.), WO. T.W. Allen (R.C.A.F.), L/Cpl. F. Rextrew, and Driver J.F. Leach were all killed. Detail provided by Bob Middleton of Killamey, Manitoba. MAXWELL, W .K. JI 9401. Please refer to page 4 74 and add the following. The two of the crew who were not Canadians were; the Wireless Operator Air Gunner R.A.F Flight Sergeant K.J. Scales and the Flight Engineer R.A.F. Sergeant E. Parker. Parker and Scales also have no known grave and their names are inscribed on the Runntmede War Memorial. Although Maxwell is shown as the observer, he was probably the bomb aimer as PIO. Lee is shown as the navigator. Detail provided by K. Brown.
MCCOLM, H.W. R56135. Please refer to page 482 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft# Z 9150 was lost during operations against Stettin. Sgt. R.W. Dunkley (RAF) was the other member of the crew killed. Smith and Dunkley are buried in a common grave at Kiel. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MCFADDEN, R.J.J. 188350. Please refer to page 490 and add the following. The squadron was based at Full Sutton when MZ 748-A went missing. Operations were against Blainville-Sur-L oeau not Blainville-Sur-Leau and include in the crew list F/O. A.H. Dowd was an Evader, Sgt. S. Manstoff (RAF) was an Evader, F.S.s F.A. Giles
(RAF) and J. W. Hargreaves (RAF) were taken Prisoners Of War. This completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
MCGAVOK, J.J. 117116. Please refer to page 491,the correct spelling is MCGAVOCK. This name has been misspelled also on page 460 under MAJOR, T.E. F/O. McGavock was with #426 Squadron when he earned his Distinguished Flying Cross. Detail provided by Neil McGavock, Mississauga, Ontario.
MCLAURIN, G.F. R205353. Please refer to page 503 and add to the crew list FS. J.B. Martin (RAAF) was also killed. This completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
MCLEAN, J. J. Rl24704. Please refer to page 504 and note the following – WO. McLean was 23 years old at the time of death, not 20. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MCLELLAN, V.A. R73406. Please refer to page 505 and note the following. Two Liberator aircraft crashed into the mountains at Shroove and Glengad on the same date, killing 16 airmen. On Sunday June 19 1994 a commemoration service was held at Greencastle, close to where one of the aeroplanes came down. Crosses were erected in memory of those who lost their lives. The service was attended by around 200 people including the mayor of Londonderry, Jim Guy and East Londonderry M.P. William Ross. A number of wreaths were laid on the graves of the airmen following Sundays service, including one sent by the Air Chief Marshal of the Australian Air Force. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
MILLAR, G.R. R62407. Please refer to page 520 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft # Z 9231-U crashed. The three RAF members who were also killed were Sgt.s G.A. Anson,
C.D.E. Campbell, and W. Powell. Sgt. R.A. Kemp
(RNZAF) is buried in the grave next to Millar. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.!’v1ILLER, V.H. R83 l 4 l. Please refer to page 523 and page 448. The detail on page 523 mentions a P/O. Jerry McKay, this should have been P/O. Gerald P. MacKay who was killed in the same action as Miller. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
!’v1ILLER, G.S. R94347. Please refer to page 522 and note that LAC. Miller was a radar mechanic not an aero engine mechanic. Detail provided by Bob McNarry of Calgary, Alberta.
MITCHELL, H. A J95253//Rl83329. Please refer to page 527 and note the following – P/O. Mitchell was from Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia, not Cape Breton. P/O Mitchell graduated from #8 AOS Ancienne Lorene, Quebec and went overseas in December of 1944. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
MOONEY, R.E. 191139. Please refer to page 532 and note the following. The aircraft crashed in a wheat stubble field one mile S.W. of RAF Foulsham. The non Canadians also killed were FS.s CJ. Ashworth (RNZAF), E.R. Annstrong (RNZAF), T.F. McCormack (RNZAF), A. McLaughlin (RNZAF), W .A. McLaren (RAF), Sgt.s G.L. Hislop (RAF), C.G.M. Ogilvie (RAF), and P.E. Durman
(RAF). Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
MOORE, J.L. R78024. Please refer to page 534 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming and Whitley aircraft# Z 6975-V was returning from a raid to Boulogne when it crashed. The other RAF member of the crew who was also killed was Sgt. N.S. Smith. Sgt. Smith is buried in Renfrewshire and the other members of the crew are all buried in Leeming in graves GI 0, GI 1, GI 5, and GI 6. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MORAN, T.M. Rl05579. Please refer to page 535 and add the following. The squadron was based at Elvington when Halifax aircraft # DT 632-Z was shot down. The six RAF members of the crew who were also killed were; Sgt.s J.D. Mahoney, L.A. Stimpson, R.G. Miles, W.A. Pasqual, J.T. Murray, and F/O. F.A. Clark. This completes this crew list. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MORRISON, W.R. 127396. Please refer to page 540 and add the following. FIL. W.G. Davies (RAF), F/O.s F.J. Dyer (RAF), B.R. Garnett {RAF), FS. K.G. Meehan (RAF), Sgt.s K.G. Porter (RAF), and S.W. Smith (RAF) were also killed. These six members of the crew are all buried in Banneville La Campagne, Calvados, France. This completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
MURPHY, W.A. R75144. Please refer to page 548 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft# Z 9312-S went missing. The three RAF members of the crew who were also killed were Sgt.s A.J. Pratley, E.C. Reynolds, and P/O. D.B. Bailey. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
MUSGRAVE, P. A. J88134//R252261. Please refer to page 550 and note the following – P/O. Musgrave was 22 years old at the time of death. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. MYERS, E.C.E. R7301 l. Please refer to page 551 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft# Z 6824 went missing during operations against Huls. S/O. A.J. Hannigan {RAF) and Sgt. C.M. Evans (RAF) were also killed, Sgt. D. Thomas (RAF) was taken Prisoner Of War. Hannigan was buried in the same cemetery as Myers. Detail from ‘Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.NEGRICH, T. 122062. Please refer to page 555 and add the following to the crew list. Sgt.s C.M. Allen (RAF), H. Barron (RAF), A.E. Jukes (RAF), H. Perkins (RAF), and FS. J.R.A. Cooke (RAF). The RAF members of the crew are all buried in the Tilly Sur Seules o Cemetery, Calvados, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
NEVILL, J.O.H. R80124 Please refer to page 558 and note the correct spelling of the surname is NEVILL not NEVILLE. Three of the R.A.F. members killed were; Sgt.s H.E. Cruze, B.T. Randall, and FIS. S. Jones. R.A.F. Sgt. 0 ‘Brien missing. Surname detail provided by The Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Ottawa, Ontario. NEWELL, E. E. J48074//R125546. Please refer to page 558 and note the following – The correct spelling for P/O. Newell’s home is Clark’s Harbour, not Clarkes Harbour. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
NICKERSON, R. 0. 118917. Please refer to page 561 and note the following – The correct spelling for P/O. Nickerson’s home is Clark’s Harbour, not Clarks Harbour. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. OAKLEY, W.H. Rl34130. Please refer to page 572 and note the following. Sgt. LC. Seager (RAF) was not part of this crew.FS. Hope (RAF) and FIL. Miller (RAF) are bothburied in the War Cemetery at Hennanville. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
O’KELLY, M.B. 118246. Please refer to page 570 and note the following. The burial location should read Orne not Manche. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
OSBORNE, C.R. Rl54757. Please refer to page 576 and note the following. The pilot was practicing three engined landings when the outer starboard engine caught fire. In May of 1992 a memorial was unveiled, at the crash site, in memory of the four Canadians and two Englishmen killed. As flags fluttered from the mastheads in a strong breeze, Wing Commander Bobby Sage, president of the York Afr Museum at Elvington, unveiled the memorial in front of representatives of the RCAF, the RAF and Wetherby Council, and many members of the Wetl1erby Golf Club. A painting of a Halifax Bomber, together with the inscribed names of those who died, will hang in tl1e Wetherby clubhouse. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England OZMENT, D.E. R61122. Please refer to page 578 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft # Z 9306-S went missing. The four crew members who were killed are all buried at Het Bildt in graves B44.28 to B44.31. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. PAGE, R.O.J. R55438. Please refer to page 579 and note the following. The aircraft crashed at Marly-le-Roi near Versailles, France. On November 11, 1994, Remberance Day in France, which is a public holiday, the Mayor and citizens of Marly in the presence of a delegation from its British “twin town”, Marlow-on-Thames, commemorated the crash of the Canadian Wellington with a moving ceremony on the military cemetery near Marly. A monument to the men who died was built by the Town and unveiled jointly by the Assistant Air Attaches, of Australia, Sqn Ldr Lefevre, of Britain, Sqn Ldr Whitaker and of Canada, Major Poisson, representing the nationalities of the dead airmen. The ceremony was witnessed by a delegation from Marlow, led by the Mayor with, amongst others, representatives from the Royal British Legion and the Aircrew Association. All the organizations present laid wreaths. Our French friends, especially the ex-Service organizations who had been witnesses to the efforts and sacrifices made during the war, by amongst others, the allied air forces, were overwhelming in their demonstrations of friendship and comradeship. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
PAJGE, E.F. 16007 Please refer to page 579 and note the following: FIOI Paige’s given names are Ernest Franklyn not Ernest Franklin. The correct name of the Island is Clare not Clage. Clage Island is located just off the west coast of Eire, County Mayo. Detail provided by K.C. Ingram – Oakville, Ontario.
PAINTER, J.H. R64809. Please refer to page 580 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft # Z 6668 went missing during operations. Sgt.s D. W. Mercer (RAF), D.G. Kemp (RAF), D. W. Gillies (RAF), and PIO. R.J. Minnis (RNZAF) were also killed. The complete crew are all buried in the same cemetery as Painter. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
PARKER, M. A. 14363 ll/Rl63544. Please refer to page 584 and note the following – The correct spelling for F/O. Parker’s home is Mount Uniacke, not Mount Uniake. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
PARSONS, A.E. Jl 1636. Please refer to page 585 and add the following. The squadron was based at Elvington when Halifax aircraft # JB 803-G went missing during night operations to Essen. The seventh member of the crew killed was Sgt. W.R. Louth (RAF). Sgt. Louth’s name is inscribed on the Runnymede War Memorial, the other six members of the crew are all buried at Muiden in graves
E.G80 to E.G85 Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
PATERSON, F.G. 128547. Please refer to page 587 and note the correct spelling of Buckenwald is Buchenwald. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France. PENNY, L. J. 195518//Rl 76767. Please refer to page 595 and note the following• PIO Penny’s home was North Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
PETIIlCK, T.M. 110279. Please refer to page 599 and note the correct spelling of Ariel is Aire!. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
PETTIT, W.R. 115517. Please refer to page 600 and note the crew list should read, Sgt. E.H.F. Atkinson (RNZAF), Sgt. G.A. Maund (RAF), and F/O. R.G. Watkins (RAF). Two others of the crew, not Canadians, missing believed killed. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
POPE, W. A. 128866. Please refer to page 610 and note the following – F/O Pope was 22 years old at the time of death, not 32. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
PRIDHAM, E.J. R274918. Please refer to page 616 and note the following. Two Halifax aircraft collided in mid-air and crashed near the village ofMorchard Bishop. Halifax# JP 201 was from 1666 HCU and all were killed except PIO. H.R. Pugh (RAAF), the eight Canadians in Halifax LL 137 all perished. On the 6th of November, 1994 the small village ofMorchard Bishop, deep in the heart of rural Devonshire, was host to one of its largest gatherings when a crowd of about two hundred paid tribute to the thirteen young airmen who tragically lost their lives when two Halifax bombers collided in the cold winter skies above the village on November 15, 1944. The granite memorial was placed in The Square in front of the village’s own memorial. A list of the names of all the airmen killed, including that of PIO. Pugh who was missing action in April 1945, is inscribed on the plaque. A service of dedication was conducted by two local churchmen, the Rev B Shillingford and Minister leffMoles. The memorial was unveiled by Colonel J.F. David, RCAF, the Canadian Air Attache in London. The overwhelming generosity of the local population not only surpassed the sum required to finance the memorial but with the surplus they were able to provide a seat in the village square where visitors may pause and contemplate the sacrifice made by so many on our behalf. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England. PRINCE, G.1. R65327. Please refer to page 617 and note the following• Lac Prince was from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
PYCHE, H.E. R225354. Please refer to page 621 and note the following. The crew of Halifax LL505 became lost in cloud during a night navigation exercise, descended through cloud to locate their position and flew into high ground at Great Carrs, Coniston, Cumberland. Fire on impact. Sgt. W.B. Ferguson (RAF) was the non Canadian who was also killed. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England. -52-QUICK, J. A. 14108. Please refer to page 623 and add the following. The squadron was based at Topcliffe when the Whitley crashed. P/O.s A.W. Ogston (RAF), A.W. Tomlinson (RAF), Sgt.s H.J. MacLean (RAF), and H.J. Gibbs (RAF) were also
killed. Ogston was buried in Springbank, Aberdeen, Tomlinson at Golders Green, Middlesex, MacLean at Ayr,
Ayrshire, and Gibbs at Battersea. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. REIMER, A. W. R61467. Please refer to page 636 and note the following. The aircraft crashed on Dec.28/41 and FS. Reimer died on Jan.12/42. Detail provided by J.A.
Galbraith, Ottawa, Ontario.
ROBERTS, G.A. J25206. Please refer to page 647 and add the following. The aircraft crashed 8 miles from Bemay at the village of Le Chamblac, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
ROBERTSON, D.R. R98882. Please refer to page 648 and note the aircraft # was BK 257 and there was only four airmen killed. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
Middlesborough, England. ROSS, A.E. R64340. Please refer to page 657 note the following. L 7565 crashed at Le Tilleul Lambert, Eure. The crew ofL 7565 were P/O. J.F. Beckett DFM (RAF), Sgt.s B.D. Moss (RAF), B.G. Seagoe (RAF), J.H. Hackett
(RAF), A.J. Harrison (RAF), and R.L. Trustram (RAF). Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
ROWSELL, T. P. W314385 Please refer to page 660. After Rowsell H. the following is added Detail:
ROWSELL, TRIFFIE PEARL LAW W314385 • Chef.
From Norris Arm, Newfoundland. Died Aug. I 0/45. Death by complications after an operation at # I Y. Depot,
Hospital, Moncton, New Brunswick. Leading AirWoman Rowsell is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery, Moncton,
New Brunswick. Detail provided by R. Stuart, Hamilton, Ontario and The Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Ontario. SAVAGE, V. D. R76137. Please refer to page 672 and note the following -FS Savage was from Waterford Lake, Nova Scotia, not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A.
Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
SAVARD, J.L.M.R. 135005. Please refer to page 672
and note the following. F/O. Savard was 20 years old at the rime of death. Detail provided by F.G. Savard -Ottawa,
Ontario.
SCHRUMP, T.H. 192034. Please refer to page 676 and add to the crew killed, P/O. W.H.S. Toyne (RAAF). TI1is completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joel Huard,
Serquigny, France.
SEABROOK, M.T 128965. Please refer to page 681 and note the following. The non Canadian killed was Sgt.
D. W.M. Giles (RAF). Detail provided by David E.
Thompson, Middlesborough, England.
SHERRil.L, T.R. 126744. Please refer to page 690 and note the following. As well as the five Canadians
previously identified, the two RAF members of the crew were Sgt.s A.S. Campbell and H.A. Nightingale. Detail
provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough,
England.
SHORE, W.R.R. ,4417, Please refer to page 692 and note the following. The three members of the crew who were not named originally are FS. E. Harrison (RAAF), P/O. M.A. Line (RAAF), and Lt. B.W. Gross (USAAF). This
completes this crew list. Detail provided by Joe.I Huard,
Serquigny, France.
SIEBEN, J.G. J 19846. Please refer to page 694 and note the following. Fifty years after the crash a memorial plaque was unveiled overlooking the village green at Aldborough, near Boroughbridge. The names of the crew are inscribed on this plaque. The seventh airman killed was FS. R. Pratt (RAF). Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
Middlesborough, England.
SILVER, J.S. RI 16171. Please refer to page 695 and
note the following. Aircraft# JD 371-0. There were three other RAF members of this crew who were Evaders, they were; Sgt.s A.W. Beard, W.P. Catley, and W. Palmer.
Those killed were all buried in consecutive graves in the War Cemetery at Heverlee, Belgium. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
SIMARD, J.J.M. Rl25326. Please refer to page 695 and note the following. The crew were on a 3 hour
cross-country training flight and on return the aircraft
descended through cloud and flew into the ground. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough,
England.
S:MIRL, G.A. R204325. Please refer to page 701 and
note the following. The crew were on a fighter affiliation
exercise against a Spitfire. They commenced their corkscrew with a steep diving turn; whereupon a wing
folded back. The aircraft did not explode but went in
relatively intact, making a large crater one mile from the church at Kirby-Underdale, Yorkshire. Detail provided by N.Ford, Cornwall, Ontario.
SMITH, C.E. 19675. Please refer to page 702 and add
the following. The squadron was attached to Coastal
Command at Chivenor when Whitley aircraft # Z 9461-V went missing during a sea search. FS.s R.G. Martin (RAF), J.M. Mantell (RAAF), P/O.s I. Ralston (RAF), G. Dawkins (RAF) and Sgt. S.T. White (RAF) were also killed. All the names of this crew are engraved on tl1e Memorial at
Runnymede. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
SMITH, R.F. ,4349, Please refer to page 708 and add tlle following. The squadron was attached to Coastal Command at Chivenor and the crew of Whitley aircraft # Z 9209-G were on an anti-submarine patrol when tlley went missing. They transmitted an S.O.S. and were never heard from
again. FS. W.J. Hilton RAF), P/O.s J.C. Kenworthy (RAF), J.W. Hawkes (RAF), Sgt.s J. Ferguson (RAF), and P.
Johnson (RAF) were also killed. All ilie names oftllis
crew are engraved on the Memorial at Runnymede. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
SMITH, K.C. R97918. Please refer to page 707 and
make the following correction. Target was
Mannheim/Ludwigshafen, Gern1any. The only member of ilie crew who was killed was the pilot, K.C. Smith. The
other members oftl1e crew, R.A.F. Sgt.s S.T.K. Smitll, H.W. Bull, C.J. Hoare, H.J. Turner, R.C.A.F. FIS. L.M. Wheatley, and R.C.A.F. Sgt. W.E. Rowbotham bailed out and were taken Prisone1 s Of War. These surviving
members concluded that their pilot, H.C. Smith, stayed at the controls so that his crew could bail out to safety. R.A.F. Sgt.s J.C. Hink and H.D. Newey were not members of this crew. Detail provided by W.E. Rowbotham of Calgary,
Alberta.
SMITH, K.C. R97918. Please refer to page 707 and note the following additional Detail. This was a night operation against Mannheim/Ludwigshafen, Gern1any. The pilot of
the aircraft, WO2 K.C. Smith maintained control of tile
aircraft so tllat all his crew could parachute to safety. He
did not get out in time. All his crew were captured and
taken Prisoners of War, they were R.C.A.F. Sgt. L.M.
Wheatley, FIS. W.E. Rowbotllam, R.A.F. Sgts. S.T.K.
Smitll, H.W. Bull, CJ. Hoare, and H.J. Turner. Please note tllat J.C. Hinks and H.D. Newey were NOT members of
this crew. Detail provided by W.E. Rowbotham, Calgary, Alberta.
SODERO, A. T. Rl24548. Please refer to page 713 and note the following -FS Sodero was 23 years old at tile time of deaili, not 21. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. SOOTIIERAN, A.G. J86393. Please refer to page 715 and note the following. On the night of 8th-9th June 1944 Bomber Command dispatched 483 aircraft on operations to raid communications targets in France to prevent German reinforcements from reaching Normandy. TI1e contribution from Linton-on-Ouse that night were ten Lancasters from 408 Squadron and ten Halifaxes from 426 Squadron with both units being detailed to attack railway marshaling yards and junctions around the town ofMayenne. The first aircraft took off shortly before 23:00 hours and the rest followed without incident. Once over the target area crews reported negligible ground defences and no use of searchlights which, together with clear skies and good visibility, made their task a little easier. The pilot of Halifax L W598, call sign OW – J 6Johnnie 6, P/O N.L. Craig, later reported “We bombed on Master Bomber’s instructions at 0 I :45 hours from a height of 5,400 feet, heading 130 degrees at 175 mph IAS.” Her load that night consisted of thirteen 500 pound timed delay general purpose bombs which once released gave the Halifax the speed to escape the target area and quickly leave a gap for another aircraft 10 fill and allow, too, her deadly cargo to fall through the night sky. On their return the weather deteriorated rapidly 10 such an extent that only one 426 Halifax landed back at Linton. Again W/C Hamber had reported a cloud base of 7,000 feet above tl1e target and of being forced to fly on instruments for most of the return journey and then having 10 divert to Dishforth to land. Shortly after 4am on the morning of the 9th Halifax J – Johnnie joined the Linton circuit and prepared to land. The weather was not good. TI1e aircraft had carried a second pilot in the “dickey” seat for this op and now all eight crew members busied themselves preparing to land whilst eagerly looking forward to a cooked break.fast and a good sleep as a short respite from ops. Sadly it was one meal they were destined never to see. Suddenly without any warning, and at a height of only 800 feet no time to recover, the number two cylinder of the starboard inner Bristol He.rcules engine blew off; the failure causing an immediate fire. With the combined effect of little height or airspeed the Halifax fell from the sky leaving the pilot no choice but to crash land the aircraft in a rapidly deteriorating siniation. At 04:10 J • Johnnie crashed on the edge Newton-on-Ouse village leaving a trail of wreckage across rain soaked fields as she tore her self in half before corning to a grinding bait. Two houses were struck by flying debris but miraculously no civilians were killed or injured. The toll amongst Johnnie’s
crew was not so slight. The bodies of four Canadian and two Royal Air Force crew members lay dead, entwined amongst the twisted remains of the Halifax. The pilot had been d1rown clear and was found alive but seriously injured and the rear gunner escaped the carnage with slight injuries. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
M.iddlesboroug, England.
SPARKS, B.N.G. Cl492 Please refer to page 717 and insert die following missing detail after SPARKES, L.V. SPARKS, BRYAN NOBLE GEORGE W/C (P) Cl492 D.S.O. From Windsor, Ontario. Died Aug.11/45. #356 India Squadron. Wing Commander Pilot Sparks died of poliomyelitis and was buried in a gravesite on the Island of Cocos. His body was exhumed and reburied in the Kranji Military Cemetery, Singapore, Malaya. W/C Sparks was awarded die Distinguished Service Order effective 25 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 2 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. Born in Wonnley, Herts.; home in Windsor or Walkerville, Ontario (mechanic);enlisted in Windsor, 2 January 1940. Commissioned January 1940. Award presented to
next-of-kin, 1 April 1949. The citation reads – “First asflight commander, and later as squadron commander, this officer has proved to be an outstanding leader boili in the air and on the ground. On operations his enthusiasm, skill and cheerful courage have set an inspiring example and have been reflected in the high standard of operational efficiency maintained in his squadron. Wing Commander Sparks’ leadership has materialiy contributed to the successful completion of many missions flown by his squadron in formation and in single sorties.” NOTE: Public Records Office Air2/9632 bas recommendation dated 19 May 1945 when he had flown 27 sorties (269 hours five
minutes). Detail provided by James Gallagher of Markham, Ontario. SPONSLER, H. R122267. Please refer to page 719 and note the following. Stirling aircraft OJ S took off from RAF Lakenheath for a night raid against Wuppertal, Germany. The aircraft was shot down by a German night fighter and crashed at Donnagen, Gem1any, on the west bank of die Rhine, midway between Neuss and Cologne. P/O.s A. W. Flack (RNZAF), J. Shepherd (RAF), Sgt.s F. Delley (RAF), H. Lloyd (RAF), and T . .B. Morris (RAF) were also killed. Detail provided by the Ministry of Defence, Great Scotland Yard, London.
STAVENOW, L.C. R283110. Please refer to page 723 and note the following. The two other members of the crew who were also killed are FS. G. Walton (RAF) and Sgt. M.O’Sullivan (RAF). FS. Walton was the second pilot onthis trip. This crew were to carry out circuits and landings and crashed into high ground shortly after take off. The starboard outer engine failed shortly after take off. The crew bad had two unsuccessful attempts to take off in another aircraft. TI1e second time the undercarriage collapsed after a tyre burst. The findings of the examining board were: the crew should have been medically exantlned before being allowed to fly again after the first crash; tl1e duty Flying Control Officer was removed from flying control duties; the Senior F.C.O. was relegated to a junior appointment; O.C. Flying was reprimanded. Sgt. O’Sullivan was buried at Castlemahon Old Graveyard, Castlemahon, County Limerick, Ireland, and FS. Walton was buried at Castle Church (St. Mary) Churchyard, Stafford. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,Middlesborough, England.STOLL, J.H. R64355. Please refer to page 732 and add
the following. The squadron was based at Leentlng when the aircraft went missing. The complete crew are all buried in the same cemetery as Stoll. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. STIJBELT, R.F. R200124. Please refer to page 737 and note the following. The reference to Kolke A.G. should read Rose H.K. Detail provided by J.A. Galbraidi, Ottawa, Ontario.
SUCHAROV, M.S. 137528. Please refer to Page 737 and include that the other crew member killed was Sgt. M. Hempseed (RAF). Sgt. Hempseed was buried in the san1e location as Sucharov. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
SWAIN, A.R. R97371. Please refer to page 741 and note the following. Wellington aircraft# W 5394. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France. TABOR, W.T. R51583 Please refer to page 745 and note the following: Flight Sergeant Tabor was killed by enemy fighter aircraft fire. Hampden aircraft # 356 was forced to ditch near shore and was again straffed by the fighter. The others of the crew, all RCAF, escaped safely. Flight Sergeant Air Gwmer Tabor was given a prope.r military service and burial led by R.A.F. Squadron Leader Foster
(144 Sqdn.) and is buried part way up a hill which overlooks Severmorosk in the Vaenga Cemetery, Russia. Detail provided by the pilot of the aircraft ex RCAF Flight Sergeant Walter H. Hood R77067- Havelock, Ontario.
TAYLOR, C.G. R69562. Please refer to page 748 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming and the crew were lost during an anack against Nuremburg. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
TIIOMPSON O.D. Rl49306. Please refer to page 757 and note the following. Aircraft # JD 213-V was based at Elvington when it went missing. FS.s E.A. Sims (RAAF), D.H.R. Kelly (RAF), Sgt.s J. Westbarn (RAF), T.W.C. Luther (RAF), T. Ogle (RAF), and J. Fitzsimmons (RAF) were also killed. 111e names of Westbarn, Luther, and Fitzsimmons are inscribed on the Runnymede War Memorial, Sims was buried at Wenduine, Belgium, Kelly at the Bergen General Cemetery, and Ogle at Crooswijk, Rotterdam. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
THOMPSON, R.B. 186841. Please refer to page 758 and note the following. F/S. V.N. Hansen (RAAF) was also killed. F/S. Hansen was buried at Criquebeuf La Campagne, Eure. There were two others, not Canadians, missing believed killed. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
THOMPSON, W. R. R76084. Please refer to page 758 and note the following – WO Thompson was from Glencoe, Pictou County, Nova Scotia, not Sunny Brae. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia. TOOLE, E. A. R53246. Please refer to page 765 and note the following – FS Toole was 24 years old at the time of death. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
TRAILL, J.E. 187484. Please refer to page 767 and note the following. Hudson aircraft #T9445 NA-O was based at Tempsford in Bedfordshire and was to drop a SOE agent behind enemy lines at Reymagen and blow up the railway lines at Betzdorf Wissen. The Germans were pouring men and supplies down this line to reinforce their front line so it was an important target. When the agent bailed out, the bag containing the explosives, which was attached to his leg, caught on the aircraft and was lost. He landed successfully but because he had no means of completing his task he had to abort the mission and return to Allied lines. The Hudson was on its way home when it was intercepted and shot down. It was subsequently proved that the Hudson was shot down by an American Air Force Black Widow night fighter aircraft. The Americans shot down two Hudsons of 161 squadron that night. Excerpt from Stirling Aircraft Association Photo Library, Fridaybridge, Eng. and provided by J.W. Smith of London, Ontario.
TUCKER, J.R. 17448. Please refer to page 771 and note the following. PIP. Tucker was from Welwyn, Saskatchewan. Detail provided by T.M. Lambert, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.
TURNER, F.O. RI06197. Please refer to page 773 and note the following. Aircraft# W 1157-U was based at Elvington when the crew went missing on operations to Krefeld. Six RAF a.irmen, Sgt.s M.J. Fitzgerald, R. Forster, G. Wood, J.M. Dalton, J.J. McPherson, and F/0. R.C. Bishop were also killed. The names of the complete crew are inscribed on the Runnymede War Memorial. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.UPPER, B.P. J89809. Please refer to page 777 and add the following to the burial location. St Hellier, Seine Maritime, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France. V AlL, D. R99576. Please refer to page 779 and note that LAC. Vail was a radar mechanic not an air frame mechanic. Detail provided by Bob McNarry of Calgary, Alberta.
VAN DROOGENBROECK, F. J88587. Please refer to page 780 and note the correct spelling of Le Favil is Le Favril. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
VANULAR, J.H. )26359. Please refer to page 781 and add the following. They were unable to land at Gardanioen, Norway, due to severe weather but managed to land at Eindhoven with unserviceable engines. This crew transferred to a Wellington as passengers which crashed on take off. 190 Squadron casualties were; F/O. J.H. Vanular (R.C.A.F.), see page 781, WO. J.A. Hay (R.C.A.F.) see page 311, and FS. Coglitan killed, F/O. Insley and FS. L.C. Sharp injured. Detail provided by Bob Middleton of Killamey, Manitoba. VICKERS, G.P. 115210. Please refer to page 784 and add to the crew list K.E. Kimber (RAF), and FS. E. Rudge (RAF). Kimber and Rudge are buried in the same cemetery as Vickers. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
VOSE, R.B. R74102. Please refer to page 786 and add the following. The squadron was based at Lemming when Whitley aircraft# Z 9299 went missing on a raid against Emsden. Sgt. P.W. Hewitt (RAF) and FS. J.W. Woodroffe (RAF) were also killed. Sgt. D.B. Grundy (RAF) was taken Prisoner Of War. The crew list for this aircraft is now complete. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. W AINWRlGHT, K.R. R69633. Please refer to page 788 and add the following. The squadron was based at
Topcliffe when Whitley aircraft# T 4279-F was lost on
operations to Schwerte, Germany. Sgt.s D.K. McFarland
(RAF), L.S. Dyer (RAF), D.H.J. Spingel (RAF), and P/O. G.V. Heslop (RAF) were also killed. This complete crew are all buried in graves 34.A.4 to 34.A.8 in the Canadian War Cemetery, Bergen-Op-Zoom. Detail from “Some of
the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
WALLACE, R.G. Rl45315. Please referto page 791
and note the crash location as north of Le Merlerault. The correct burial location is Orne not Manche. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
WALTON, J. H. R137620. Please refer to page 793 and note the following -FS Walton was 22 years old at the time of death, not 33. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
WARD, R.R. 113397. Please refer to page 794 and note the following -F/O Ward was from Victoria Dale, not
Victoria Vale. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
WARREN, E.F. Jl 7093. Please refer to page 796 and
change to read as follows, was buried at Le Fidelaire. Two others of the crew also killed were FIL. H.D. Churchill
DFC & Bar (RAF) and F/O. J.D. Foster DFC (RAF). As of January 1996 both Churchill and Foster are still buried at Le Fidelaire, Eure, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
WAR WICK, V.M. J22590. Please refer to page 797 and note the following. The three RAF members of this crew who were also killed are Sgt.s J.I. Jones, W.T. Morgan, and C.P. Ryan. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
Middlesborough, England.
WATT, N.A. J9174. Please refer to page 799 and note
the following correction. F/O. Watt had taken off from
Digby with two other pilots from 416 squadron on a
routine training flight. As the three aircraft were in a tail
chase, P/O. Phillips and Sgt. J.L.A. Cahlot lost sight of
Watt, spotting his aircraft later in an inverted dive from
which it did not recover before plunging into the soft
ground of the Lincolnshire fen. The remains of BL 655 are displayed at the East Kirkby Aviation Museum, they will
stand as a memorial to a young Canadian pilot who gave
his life in the service of his King and Country at the age of twenty-one. Detail provided by David E. Thompson,
Middlesborough, England. WAY, W.H. Jl0777. Please referto page 800 and add to the crew list Sgt. J.E. Jennings (RAF), P/O. D.R.
Hollingsworth (RAF), and FS. R.H. Cooper (RAF). One other member of the crew, not Canadian, missing believed killed. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
WHITING, D.S. 187877. Please refer to page 811 and
add to crew list P/O. J.H.N. Cleminson (RAAF).
Cleminson was buried in the same cemetery as Whiting. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.
WILBEE, B.G. R63731 Please refer to page 813 and add the following. The squadron was based at Leeming when Whitley aircraft # Z 6934 was lost during a raid against
Berlin. Sgt.s L.G. Sinclair, R.F. Archer (RAF), C.A. Foster (RAF), and P/O. S. Goulston (RAF) were also killed. TI1e complete crew are all buried in the same cemetery. Detail from “Some of the Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.
WILLISTON, D. A. Rl24616. Please refer to page 818 and note the following -FS Williston was from Sydney
Mines, Nova Scotia, not Sydney, Nova Scotia. Detail
provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
WOOLA VER, A. S. 128532. Please refer to page 829
and note the following -F/O Woolaver was from
Blomidon, Nova Scotia, not Blomindon, Nova Scotia.
Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
WRIGHT, J. J89895. Please refer to page 831 and add to the crew list the following. Sgt. J.T. Price (RAF) was also killed and is buried in Beaumont Les Nonains, Oise,
France. There are now only two others, not Canadians,
missing believed killed. Detail provided by Joel Huard,
Serquigny, France. YOUNG, G.J. 188753. Please refer to page 837 and note the correct spelling of Les Hagues is Les Rogues. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France. ZULAUF, F. R. J 17205. Please refer to page 843 and note the following -ZULAUF, FS Franklin Roy (R90297) -Distinguished Flying Medal• No.78 Squadron -Award effective 13 May as per London Gazette dated 18 May 1943 and AFRO 1078/43 dated 11 June 1943 -Born 1922 in Milverton, Ontario; enlisted in London, Ontario, 21 February 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS
(graduated 18 August 1941), No.3 BGS (graduated 22 December 1941), and No. I CNS (graduated 19 January 1942). Award
presented by King George VI 12 October 1943. The citation reads • “Flight Sergeant Zulauf has always shown the keenest desire 10 proceed on operations. A highly efficient bomb aimer, he has consistently displayed great determination and courage in
pressing home his attacks on some of the enemy’s most heavily defended targets. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans,
Ontario.