Historical Aircraft

Additional Losses – Abrams to Dunphy

 

ABRAMS, S.W. Rl80521. Aircraft# JD 465-U. The other members of the crew were all RAF, F/O. J.P. Wood and FS. J. Adamson were taken Prisoners of War. S/L. N. W. Wright, Sgt.s A.R. Downes, K.W. Darrah, R.B. Spence, and R.E. Fuller were all killed and are all buried in consecutive graves in the Berlin War Cemetery. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England

ADAMS, L.J. J23878.

ADAMS, E.V. R62722. Mention in Despatches – No.1664 Conversion Unit – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Home in Sherbrooke, Quebec; enlisted there 23 July 1940. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

AISTROP, C.S. J13484.  AISTROP, WO2 (now P/O) Charles Sidney (J13484) – Air Force Cross – No.1 SFTS – Award effective 16 April 1943 as per London Gazette of 13 April 1943 and AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943 – Home in Sudbury; enlisted in Toronto, 21 September 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 November 1940), No.3 EFTS (graduated 16 January 1941), and No.6 SFTS (graduated 29 March 1941). Medal may not have been received by him; card says it was returned to Government House. The following citation found in Governor General’s Records, RG.7 Group 26, Volume 57, file for 1943. Pilot Officer Aistrop is outstanding in all the necessary characteristics for a first class Flying Instructor. He has realized the need for good instructors and has worked toward this end at all times. His cheerful manner and extreme devotion to duty have set an example to his pupils and other instructors which has resulted in a turnout of trained pilots of the highest caliber. He has, since graduation, flown 1,200 hours, of which approximately 1,000 hours were instructional completed over a period of seventeen months. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

AITKEN, J. R. 528206. At time of death Sgt. Aitken was 24 years old. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

ALEXANDER, E.S. J15543. ALEXANDER, FS Edward Sudbury (R58263) -Distinguished Flying Medal – No.419 Squadron – Award effective 22 May 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 880-881/42 dated 12 June 1942. Born in UK, home in Montreal; bank clerk. Home in Vancouver, enlisted there 3 September 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941 ), No.3 AOS (graduated 26 May 1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 7 July 1941) and No.l ANS (graduated 4 August 1941). Commissioned 4 June 1942. Invested at Buckingham Palace November 1942. Killed in action 14 January 1944 (Lancaster ND357, No.156 Squadron); buried in Holland. The citation reads. “One night in April 1942, Flight Sergeant Alexander was observer of an aircraft detailed to attack Kiel. The attack was completely successful but on the return flight the aircraft was engaged by an enemy fighter. Damage was caused to the port airscrew and the hydraulic system, and the rear turret was so severely damaged that the gunner was unable to open its doors. Flight Sergeant Alexander, although slightly wounded in the arm, forced the turret doors with an axe and helped the rear gunner out. Although nearly all the instruments were unserviceable, Flight Sergeant Alexander’s skillful navigation was mainly responsible for the safe return of the aircraft and crew. The courage and high sense of duty displayed by this airman has been an inspiration to the other members of the crew.” ALEXANDER, F/L Edward Sudbury, DFM (115543) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.156 Squadron. Award effective 10 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. NOTE: AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April canceled this award. Was it reinstated? This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ALEXANDER, R.W. J2833. ALEXANDER, F/L Robert Wilfred (12833) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.148 Squadron. Award effective 7 April 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 611/42 dated 24 April 1942. Born in Norwich, Ontario, 1920, home there or Paris Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 16 April 1940. Trained at No. l ITS. Graduated from No.1 AOS, 17 August 1940 and No. I ANS, Trenton, 26 October 1940. Medal presented April 1943. The citation reads – “As an air observer this officer has carried out 51 operational sorties against the enemy. He has participated in many attacks against objectives in Libya, Syria, Greece, and in the whole Mediterranean area. Flight Lieutenant Alexander is a fine bomb aimer and an exceptionally good navigator. Over a long period he has been carrying out duties of Squadron Navigation Officer with great success and his experience as an observer combined with his ability as an instructor have enabled him to attain a very high standard of navigation in the squadron. This officer has displayed consistent keenness, coolness and determination and has set a fine example to all.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ALLAN, G. I. J19255. His age at death was 37. ALLAN, F/O George Ingram (J19255) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.692 Squadron (missing) – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Davidson, Saskatchewan, 1908; home in Imperial, Saskatchewan; Educated at University of Saskatchewan. Enlisted in Saskatoon 7 January 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 28 April 1941 ), No.3 AOS (graduated 21 July 1941 ), No.5 BGS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 29 September 1941). Killed in action with No.142 Squadron, 12 January 1945 (Mosquito KB463); name on Runnymede Memorial. Medal presented to next-of-kin December 1946. No citation other than completed … numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty. Public Records Office Air 2/8830 has recommendation flown 60 sorties (255) hours in two tours. His first tour began in May, 1942 with a trip to Cologne and ended with a trip to Karlsruhe in September of the same year. He made trips to Essen (2), Bremen (3), Emden (3), GARDENING (Terschelling ls., Danish coast, Heligoland), Sea Search (1 ), Wilhelmshaven (1), Frisian Islands (1), Duisburg (3), Hamburg (1), Dusseldorf (2), Osnabruk (I), Mainz (1), Flensburg (1), Kassel (1), Saarbrucken (1), and Karlsruhe (1). His second tour began with a trip to Bremen on July 19, 1944 and ended with a trip to Berlin on October 23, 1944. He completed operations to Bremen (2), Kiel (2), Frankfurt (2), Berlin (7), Stuttgart (l ), Hamburg (2), Castrop Rauxel (1), Cologne (2), Essen (I), Dusseldorf (), Karlsruhe (1), Hanover (1), Nuremburg (1), Brunswick (2), Mannheim (2), Wilhelmshaven (2), and Wiesbaden (1). This officer, as navigator and bomb aimer, has now completed a very large number of operational sorties against well defended and far distant targets Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ALLAN, J.L. J19586. ALLAN, F/O James Llewellyn (119586) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.198 Squadron – Award effective 8 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Born in Valparaiso, Saskatchewan, 1921; home in Tisdale, Saskatchewan; teacher in civilian life. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 13 August 1941. Trained at No. 7 ITS (graduated 28 March 1942), No.2 EFTS (graduated 20 June 1942) and No.l SFTS (graduated 9 October 1942). Killed in action 3 November 1944 (Typhoon MN707 of No.198 Squadron); buried in Belgium. Medal presented to next-of-kin February 1946. The citation reads – “Flying Officer Allan has taken part in numerous attacks on enemy road and rail transport, tanks, radio installations and gun positions. He has led his section with great skill and courage, qualities which have contributed materially to the successes obtained. He has set a fine example to all.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ALLCROFT, F.C. J17472. ALLCROFT, P/O Frederick Charles (117472) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.61 Squadron. Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Born in Vancouver, 1923; home there; enlisted there 24 June 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 4 October 1941 ), No.15 EFTS (graduated 8 December 1941) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Commissioned 1943. The citation reads – “On his first sortie, which was against heavily defended objectives at Essen, the aircraft in which this officer was flying was hit by anti-aircraft fire but, undaunted by this, he bombed the target and made a safe return on three engines. During a sortie to Dortmund in May 1943, his aircraft was attacked by enemy fighters on the outward flight. After the attack had been skillfully evaded, one engine in the aircraft failed, but despite this he proceeded to the target which was successfully bombed. On the return journey another engine failed but by superb skill and determined courage this pilot made a safe return. Throughout all his operational sorties Pilot Officer Allcroft has displayed high courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ALLEN, L.A. J1769. ALLEN, F/L Lawrence Arnold (114769) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.420 Squadron (deceased) Award effective 27 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 December 1946. Born in Edmonton, Alberta, 1917; home in Windsor, Ontario where he was a theater manager; enlisted there 6 January 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 21 June 1942) and No.l AOS (graduated 23 October 1942). Navigator, killed in action with No.405 Squadron, 27/28 April 1944, Lancaster JA976. Buried in Belgium. Award presented to mother in Detroit, 17 May 1950. The citation reads – “This officer has completed as navigator many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” ALLEN, F/L Lawrence Arnold, DFC (114 769) – Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm (deceased) – Awarded 17 July 1948 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 455/48 dated 23 July 1948. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ANDERSON, F. J864011. The s/n should be 186401. Detail provided by J.A. Galbraith, Ottawa, Ontario.

ANDERSON, W.B. J8924. Distinguished Flying Cross. No.429 Squadron – Award effective 7 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2032/44 dated 22 September 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 1914; home there. Educated at University of Manitoba. Enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 22 April 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 15 July 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated l September 1941) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 21 November 1941). Commissioned 1941. Medal presented 2 December 1946. On 7/8 June 1944 he was severely wounded during raid on Acheres. He ordered crew to bale out and the navigator, bomb aimer and wireless operator did so over the continent. The aircraft was flown back to England by the RAF flight engineer. Near Benson, the remaining crewmen assisted Anderson into parachute and got him out; parachute seen to open. The flight engineer and two gunners baled out safely, but Anderson died before being located. Halifax LW128 crashed one half miles north of Benson airfield. CGM (Flying) to Sergeant G.E.J. Steere (RAF, Flight Engineer), DFMs to Sergeants J. Mangione and G.J.M. Ritchie (RCAF). The citation reads – “This officer has taken part in many attacks on targets in Germany and has invariably displayed a high degree of skill and gallantry. On a recent occasion, when returning from an operation against Karlsruhe, his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Squadron Leader Anderson was injured about the eyes by flying splinters. Although temporarily blinded he piloted the aircraft clear of the target area. Later the second pilot took over the controls, but Squadron Leader Anderson fully maintained his duties as captain throughout the remainder of the homeward flight. This officer is a most efficient flight commander whose leadership and devotion to duty have set a fine example.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ANDERSON, W.A. C1099. Distinguished Flying Cross – No.407 Squadron – Award effective 15 December 1941 as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1943 and AFRO 616/43 dated 9 April 1943. Born in Winnipeg, 1918; home there. Enlisted there 9 September 1939. Trained at Camp Borden and Trenton. Killed in action on Hudson AM712, 12 February 1942; name on Runnymede Memorial. Medal presented to next-of-kin, 20 March 1944. The citation reads – “This officer has always shown the greatest keenness and enthusiasm for operational flying. On one occasion he carried out a successful low level attack on a well defended convoy off Ameland, obtaining a hit on the largest vessel of some 10,000 tons. On another occasion he attacked convoys at night, always at a low level, and in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, obtaining a hit on a 2,500 ton vessel from fifty feet. He also attacked the vessel with machine gun fire. On another sortie S/L. Anders was detailed to illuminate the position of a convoy to direct a bombing force to the attack. He skillfully accomplished his mission in the face of fire from the ship. He assumed command of a flight in November 1941. This officer has at all times shown great courage.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ANDERSON, P.M. J16379. Distinguished Flying Cross – No.97 Squadron – Award effective 11 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 26 March 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born in Manitoba, 1922; educated at University of Manitoba; home in Union Point, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS
(graduated 16 August 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 13 July 1948. The citation reads – “This officer has completed numerous sorties including several attacks on targets in Italy. He has always displayed great courage and skill. One night in February 1943 he completed a successful attack on Lorient in difficult circumstances. Three nights later he flew with distinction in an attack on the same target.” – Mention in Dispatches – Overseas – Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. No citation in AFRO. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ANTOFT, O.H. J25114. The crew of Stirling aircraft # LJ 943 and Stirling aircraft # LJ 982 have not been identified correctly. LJ 943 crashed near Zetten between Ede and Bennekon killing P/O. R.B. Herger (R.C.A.F.) F/O. O.H. Antoft (R.C.A.F. ), F/O. JX. MacDonnell (R.C.A.F.), WO. L.l. Whitlock (R.C.A.F.), F/O. A. Thomington (R.A.F.), Drivers E. Noble and L. Parker. Sgt. L.J. Hillyard (R.A.F.) and WO J.C. Thomas were taken Prisoners of War. For the correct detail regarding LJ 982 please see Harrison G.E. Detail provided by Bob Middleton of Killarney, Manitoba.

ARCHER, P.L.I. J3508. Distinguished Flying Cross – No.416 Squadron – Award effective 24 August 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 September 1942 and AFRO 1535/42 dated 25 September 1942. Born in Bridgetown, Barbados, 1917. Joined RCAF in Montreal, 6 June 1940. Trained at No. 1 ITS , No.6 EFTS, and No.1 SFTS. Posted overseas immediately; to No.57 OTU, 17 February 1941; to No.92 Squadron, 5 May 1941 where he destroyed three enemy aircraft and damaged one. To No.412 Squadron, 11 November 1941; to No.416 Squadron (Flight Commander), 10 March 1942. To Station Kenley, 1 December 1942. Presented with award 9 February 1943. Designated CO, No.402 Squadron, 13 June 1943 and attached to No.421 Squadron for a few days to get back to operational standards. On 17 June 1943 he took command of No.421 Squadron on posting of CO; killed in action 17 June 1943. Aerial victories as follows: 23 June 1941, one Bf.109F destroyed southeast of Boulogne; 7 July 1941, one Bf.109F destroyed and one damaged near Lille; 9 July 1941, one Bf.109F destroyed near Bethune; 18 July 1942, one Do.217 destroyed east of Orfordness; 17 June 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (action in which he was killed). The citation reads – “This officer has completed sorties over enemy territory and has destroyed at least four enemy aircraft. On one occasion, although wounded in the leg, Flight Lieutenant Archer flew his badly damaged aircraft back to the base where he executed a skillful landing. He is a most efficient leader.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ARNOT, DM. J14470. The aircraft was attacked by a German night fighter while leaving Magdeburg at 19,500 feet. The aircraft was damaged and the order to bail out was given at 14,000 feet. An explosion was heard and the bomb aimer, W. V. Thom, was blown clear. P/O. Nickerson was killed in the air and the rest of the crew were found dead in the wreckage. P/O. R. Dawson (RAF) was the other member killed in this crew. W/C. Martin was second pilot for this trip. Please refer to F/O. V.M. Warwick for the crew list of the second aircraft. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No. 427 Squadron – Award effective 10 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Born in Toronto in 1918; home there; enlisted Toronto, 13 August 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 October 1943), No.14 EFTS (graduated 22 December 1940) and No.1 SFTS ( graduated 17 March 1941). Commissioned 1942. Medal presented 28 February 1946. No citation other than “completed many successful operations against the enemy in which (he has) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England, and H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

ASH, G.H. ,129520. The aircraft was Hudson # T9463 – L. The wreckage was found three miles north-east of Houffalize near the south-east border of Belgium and Luxemburg. The crew were on their way home after dropping an agent near Armstadt to the south of Erfurt but a night fighter intercepted them. Detail provided by J.A. Galbraith, Ottawa, Ontario.

ATKINSON, T. B. J23757//R137833. – F/L. Atkinson was from Clarke’s Harbour not Clarke Harbour. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

AUBREY, G.A. J35746. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.415 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Toronto, 1913, home there. Served in RCASC before joining RCAF in Toronto, 22 May 1941. Trained at No.l ITS (graduated 2 April 1943) and No.4 AOS (graduated 17 September 1943). Commissioned 1943. Killed in flying accident at No.3 (P) AFU, 29 April 1945 (Oxford DF332). Award sent by registered mail to next-of-kin, 2 December 1946. No citation other than “completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which (he has) invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file
181.009 D.1750 (RG.24 Vol.20608) has recommendation forwarded to Station Eastmoor, 23 November 1944, when he had flown 32 sorties (160 hours 20 minutes) between 21 June and 6 October 1944. This officer has participated in numerous operational sorties which have included missions to Hamburg, Kiel, Wane Eickel and Castrop Rauxel. His navigation has always been of a very high standard and he has a fine record of achievement. His determination and confidence while on operations has always been an inspiration to the squadron while his gallantry and devotion to duty has done much to create a high morale among his fellow navigators. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

AUDET, R.J. J20126. His age at death was 23. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.411 Squadron – Award effective 16 February 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born in Lethbridge, Alberta, 13 March 1922; home there. Enlisted at Calgary, 26 August 1941. Attended Manning Depot in Brandon, Manitoba. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 10 April 1942), No.22 EFTS (graduated 3 July 1942) and No.2 SFTS (wings and commission, 23 October 1942). Posted to “Y” Depot, Halifax for overseas movement, 7 November 1942. To OTU and then to No.421 Squadron, 20 July 1943. After several other postings, reached No.411 Squadron, 23 October 1944. Killed in action 3 March 1945. Award presented to next-of-kin, 5 November 1946. See H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky, for biographical details. Article in early issue of Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society also expands. The citation reads -“This officer has proved himself to be a highly skilled and courageous fighter. In December 1944 the squadron was involved in an engagement against twelve enemy fighters in the Rheine/Osnabruck area. In a most spirited action, Flying Office Audet achieved outstanding success by destroying five enemy aircraft. This feat is a splendid tribute to his brilliant shooting, great gallantry and tenacity.” AUDET, F/L Richard Joseph (J20136) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.411 Squadron – Award effective 9 March 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 625/45 dated 13 April 1945. The citation reads – “This officer is an outstanding fighter pilot. Since his first engagements towards the end of December 1944, he has completed numerous sorties during which he has destroyed a further six enemy aircraft bringing his total victories to eleven. Flight Lieutenant Audet has also most effectively attacked numerous locomotives and mechanical vehicles. His skill and daring have won the highest praise.” H.Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

AWREY, D.M 119610. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.433 Squadron (deceased) -Award effective 30 March 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born in Leamington, Ontario, 1921. Home in Windsor, Ontario. Enlisted Hamilton, 31 January 1941. Trained at No. l ITS (graduated 11 April 1942) and No.9 AOS (graduated 15 August 1942). Commissioned December 1943. Killed in action 30/31 March 1944 (Halifax HX272). Award presented to mother at Government House, 7 November 1949. The citation reads -“This officer has completed as navigator many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which be has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BAGGS, H.G. R141241 – Sgt. Baggs was stationed at Pendelton, Ontario at the time of his death. Detail provided by W.L. Durham, Waterloo, Ontario.

BAIN, J.D.M. J6027. -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.156 Squadron – Award effective 30 May 1942 as per London Gazette dated 27 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 8 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 11 February 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 10 April 1941) and No.33 SFTS (graduated 2 July 1941 ). Commissioned 1941. Killed in action, 31 May 1942; buried in Holland. Award presented 10 next-of-kin, March 1944. The citation reads – “This officer is a very fine captain of aircraft whose courage, determination and leadership have been of a high order. He has participated in attacks on a wide range of enemy targets including Cologne, Bremen, Berlin, Brest, Essen, Mannheim and Rostock. On all occasions he has pressed home his attack with vigor. In one attack, in the vicinity of Kiel, his aircraft was forced down to 300 feet. He coolly machine gunned three searchlights and silenced severallight gun positions.” Detail provided by H. Halliday,Orleans, Ontario.

BAKER, D.H. J25179. Please see Steepe J.R. not Steppe J.R. F/O. Baker was 27 when he was killed.

BAKER, E.D. J5060. His age at death was 27, please add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.214 Squadron – Award effective 30 March 1942 as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1943 and AFRO 616/43 dated 9 April 1943. Born in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, 1915; home in Charlottetown; enlisted Montreal, 19 July 1940. Trained at No. 1 ITS (graduated 3 November 1940), No.3 EFTS (graduated 18 January 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 4 May 1941). Commissioned April 1941. Killed in action on 1 April 1942, flying Wellington 28842. Name on Runnymede Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin, March 1944. The citation reads – “This officer has completed numerous sorties since September 1941,involving attacks on Berlin, Stettin, Kiel, Brest, Hamburg, and Lubeck. He has at all times displayed enthusiasm for operations and has pressed home his attacks with vigor. One night in February 1942, whilst attacking Kiel, his aircraft was extensively damaged by anti-aircraft fire, the undercarriage, flaps and turrets being rendered useless. The airspeed indicator ceased to function and the fabric was torn in numerous places. On the return journey height was lost continually owing to engine trouble. Despite this, Flight Lieutenant Baker skillfully flew his damaged aircraft to an airfield in this country where he landed with the undercarriage retracted. On impact the aircraft caught fire. The crew managed to escape but the second pilot and a gunner each sustained a fractured arm while Flight
Lieutenant Baker’s nose was broken. His experiences have in no way diminished his enthusiastic daring and fortitude.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BALDWIN, W.H. J15169. Please refer to page 29 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.405 Squadron -Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Ottawa, 1910; home there ( commercial artist; did lettering for almost all the Book of Remembrance, 1934-1940; also a radio announcer forCKCO); enlisted Ottawa, 28 June 1940. Trained at No. IITS, No. I AOS, No. I BGS and No. I ANS. Posted overseas, June 1941. With No.405 Squadron, 5 September 1941 to 13 September 1942 (31 sorties); Award presented 8 December 1942. To Ottawa on leave, December 1942. Killed in action, 23/24 August 1943 (Halifax HR918);buried in Germany. The citation reads – “Pilot Officer Baldwin is a navigator of exceptional ability which,
combined with his courage and initiative, has contributed materially to tl1e success of the operations in which he has participated. His urtfailing cheerfulness and optimism, in spite of all hazards, has proved a source of inspiration.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BALKWILL, S.H. R83899. F/L. Balkwill earned his DFM while still a Flight Sergeant. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.39 Squadron – Award effective 19 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 9 December 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 16 May 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 2 July 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 13 September 1941). Award presented 28 March 1944. The citation reads – “As pilot, this airman has taken part in twenty sorties from Malta, three of which have been torpedo. In February 1943, he was detailed to make an attack on enemy shipping off Maritimo. While over the target the aircraft was subjected to intense anti-aircraft fire and repeatedly hit in the fuselage and tail. Serious damage was sustained which made the aircraft difficult to control, but despite this, Flight Sergeant Balkwill, with great skill and courage, succeeded in returning to base safely. He has at all times exhibited exceptional courage and resource during his operational duties and has proved himself to be a first-class torpedo bomber pilot.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BALLANTYNE, J.H. R85860. Ballantyne was still a Flight Sergeant when he won his DFM. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.229 Squadron -Award effective 1 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 December 1942 and AFRO 2069/42 dated 18 December 1942. Born 18 January 1918 in Toronto; home there; clerk for three years with General Accident Assurance Company); enlisted there 20 December 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 10 April 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 8 August 1941 ). Flight Sergeant, 1 June 1942; WO2, 8 August 1942; commissioned 29 October 1942. To Halifax, 10 August 1941; arrived overseas 2 September 1941; to No.58 OTU, 28 October 1941; to No.222 Squadron, 10 January 1942; to HQ. Middle East, 26 May 1942; to No.229 Squadron, 29 October 1942; to UK, 16 November 1942; to No.59 OTU, 3 December 1942; repatriated 30 September 1943; arrived Canada, 29 October 1943; returned to UK, 21 December 1943; to No.403 Squadron, 4 January 1944; killed in action, 8 March 1944. Crashes include the following: 12 December 1941 while dog fighting with another Spitfire became lost and R/T went unserviceable; touched down in a field, lifted over a fence, settled again and aircraft was on soft ground, went on nose and then on back; 31 July 1942, with No.603 Squadron, Luqa, engine failed, bad to retract wheels to avoid going into ravine; 22 December 1942 at No.58 OTU crashed a Hurricane when he took off on gravity tank and failed to switch to main tank. The citation reads – “Since June, 1942, this airman pilot has destroyed at least five enemy aircraft and damaged others. One day in July 1942, he became separated from his section but with courage and determination attacked three Messerschmitt 109s, destroying one. Some days later Flight Sergeant Ballantyne was leading his section when the squadron attacked a formation of enemy heavy bombers. The bombers were successfully intercepted and pursued to within ten miles of of the Sicilian coast. On yet another occasion this pilot attacked two Junkers 88s and then while separated from his squadron was attacked by four enemy fighters. By skillful maneuvering and great tenacity he fought off the enemy fighters and landed his aircraft safely. Flight Sergeant Ballantyne is a most courageous and brave fighter pilot, who has played a worthy part in the defense of Malta.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BANKS, J.S. J15267//R11620. His age at death was 26. FS (now P/O) Jack Standish (Can 11620)­ – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.9 Squadron (unit not given in AFRO) – Award effective 13 April 1942 as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1942 and AFRO 611/42 dated 24 April 1942. Born at Torbrook Mines, Nova Scotia, 1917; home there or East Angus, Quebec (electrician); enlisted in Halifax, Nova Scotia, 14 September 1939. Trained at No.6 ITS and No.20 EFTS before washing out as pilot. Graduated from No.1 BGS, Jarvis, 25 November 1940. Subsequently commissioned (J15267); killed in flying accident at No.20 (P) AFU, 3 June 1943 (Oxford V3821 ). The citation reads – “One night in January 1942 this airman was the front gunner of an aircraft which carried out a low level attack on the aerodrome Abbschipol. Nearing the aerodrome a Dornier 217 was intercepted and Sergeant Banks coolly shot it down from close range. During the bombing run his aircraft was held in the searchlights but by his accurate fire Sergeant Banks extinguished two of them and at the same time warned his pilot, who was blinded by the glare, of the danger of colliding with a hangar. Throughout he displayed determination and resource. This airman has participated in thirty-one sorties over enemy and enemy occupied territory wherein targets have been attacked at important centers such as Dusseldorf, Hamm, Cologne, Kiel, Genda and Brest.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BARKWELL, J.H. R163850. The complete crew are all buried in the same cemetery. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

BEBENSEE, D.G. R68061. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.35 Squadron – Awarded 31 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943 – Born in Bothwell, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 19 June 1940. Trained Overseas. Arrived at No.35 Squadron, 5 March 1943. First sortie was 8/9 March 1943 (Nuremburg; bombs dropped but one-third of incendiaries hung up, rear turret was unserviceable for 45 minutes, and port inner engine failed 250 miles from base). Second attack was 9/10 March (returned early with a faulty starboard engine). Third attack was 1/12 March (Stuttgart, bombed successfully; wings holed by flak); fourth attack was 10/11 April (Frankfurt, uneventful); fifth was 13/14 April (Spezia); sixth was 18/19 April (Spezia); seventh was 16/17 April (Mannheini). Eighth sortie was the DFM event 20/21 April to Stettin. Bombs hit aircraft at 0108 hours while coned by searchlights – pilot’s seat set on fire, explosion in engineer’s compartment. Pilot ordered crew to bale out; rear gunner and bomb aimer complied before pilot regained control. Cited with P/O W.S. Sherk (Bar to DFC), F/O G.G. McGladrey (DFC) and F/O R.G. Morrison (DFC). Last sortie with unit was 26/27 April (Duisburg, uneventful). To No.405 Squadron, 5 July 1943. Killed in action 13/14 July 1943 (Halifax HR.905); buried in Holland; Award presented to next of kin. 27 June 1945. The citation reads – “One night in April 1943, Pilot Officer Sherk and Flying Officers McGladrey and Morrison and Sergeant Bebensee were pilot, wireless operator, navigator and flight engineer, respectively, in an aircraft which attacked Stettin. Whilst over the target area the bomber was struck by falling incendiary bombs. One of them which lodged behind the pilot’s seat jammed the aileron and rudder controls. Flames and smoke rapidly filled the cockpit and Pilot Officer Sherk’s clothing caught alight. The aircraft began to lose height diving steeply. Pilot Officer Sherk endeavoured to regain control whilst Flying Officer McGladrey attempted to subdue the flames. Meanwhile Sergeant Bebensee struggled to free the locked controls. Just as the situation appeared hopeless the pilot regained control and a course was set for home as Flying Officer McGladrey extinguished the fire. Much of the navigational equipment had been lost but Flying Officer Morrison, displaying great skill, was able to plot accurate courses. Sergeant Bebensee who worked untiringly for three-quarters of an hour succeeded in freeing the controls. Eventually Pilot Officer Sherk flew the badly damaged bomber back to this country in circumstances fraught with great danger displaying great courage, skill and determination.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BEIRNES, J.R. C13458. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.438 Squadron – Award effective 24 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944 – Born in 1914, Birtle, Man.; pre-war home in Tofield, Alberta. Enlisted in Edmonton, 13 April 1940. Killed in flying accident with No.438 Squadron, 1 June 1945 (Typhoon SW393); buried in Denmark. Award presented to next of kin, 9 December 1947. In July, 1944, Squadron Leader Beirnes led a formation of aircraft in an attack on a vital railway bridge over die river Orne just south of Caen. In spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and much low cloud the attack was well pressed home and the bridge destroyed. The citation reads – “In this well executed operation, Squadron Leader Beirnes displayed a high degree of skill, courage, and leadership. In August 1944 this officer again proved his skill when leading a formation in an attack against enemy mortar positions near the Forest of Grimbosq.” BEIRNES, S/L Jack Rife, DFC (C13458) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.438 Squadron (deceased). Award effective 3 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1944 and AFRO 1672/45 dated 2 November 1945. The citation reads – “Now on his third tour of operational duty, this officer has proved to be an outstanding squadron commander. In April 1945 Squadron Leader Beirnes led his squadron on a rail interdiction sortie which severely disrupted the enemy’s lines of communication. On another occasion he led an attack on a light cruiser. His squadron scored six hits despite heavy opposition from anti-aircraft fire. The cruiser was set ablaze and was seen to be listing to port. This officer displayed coolness and courage throughout” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BELL, D. J35329. -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.429 Squadron – Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born in Winnipeg, 1916; home in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, yet enlisted in Winnipeg, 15 September 1939. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 19 March 1943), No.12 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1943) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943) Commissioned 1943. Killed in action 30 November 1944 (Halifax MZ288); name on Runnymede Memorial. Medal presented to next of kin (widow), 5 October 1946. The citation reads – “In October 1944, Flying Officer Bell was the captain and pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. It was his first mission as captain. In the bombing run considerable anti-aircraft fire was encountered and the aircraft was hit. The flight engineer was wounded. Flying Officer Bell promptly directed another member of the crew to render first aid to his injured comrade. Almost as the bombs were released, the aircraft was again hit. The port aileron was broken in half and it became exceedingly difficult to keep the aircraft on an even keel but, displaying the greatest determination, Flying Officer Bell flew the badly damaged aircraft to the nearest available airfield in this country where he effected a masterly landing. This officer displayed great tenacity and devotion to duty in trying circumstances.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BELL, R.G. R76955. Age at time of death was 27. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Kelowna, Saskatchewan, 1915; home in Vancouver (salesman); enlisted in Edmonton, 17 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 29 April 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 7 July 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 13 September 1941 ). Killed in flying accident, 9 November 1942 ( crew of five, fighter affiliation exercise). The citation reads – “One night in August 1942, this airman was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg. Whilst over the target area his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter from close range. Diving steeply, Sergeant Bell evaded further attacks but his aircraft sustained extensive damage. The elevator, port ailerons and fuselage were all pierced, the port petrol tanks were riddled while the hydraulics were shot away and one of the gun cupolas was smashed. The wireless operator was injured and Sergeant Bell was badly cut on the right hand by splintered perspex. Despite this he made another run over the target and bombed it. Shortly after leaving the target area one of the engines failed and the aircraft spun towards the ground. Sergeant Bell, however, skillfully regained control and eventually flew his damaged bomber back to an aerodrome in this country where he executed a skillful crash landing. In face of harassing circumstances this airman displayed great courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BELL, R. M. J27371. – Air Medal (United States)- 11th USAAF (deceased) – Details found in DHist file 181.009 D.4402 (RG.24 Vol.20648) where USAAF 11th Air Force General Order No.106 dated 27 August 1943, on behalf of Alaska Defense Command, lists officers receiving Air Medal for meritorious achievement in aerial flight with the following citation; NOTE: The same order awards posthumous Air Medals to J5216 F/L D.W.N. Wakeling (Vancouver, flights 1 January to 6 May 1943), J1 11978 F/L R.F. Galbraith (Shelburne, flights 18 April to 26 July, 1943), and J27371 P/O R.M. Bell (Hot Springs, Arkansas, flights 19 April to 10 August 1943). Apparently not approved by RCAF authorities. The file contains much operational information on all those decorated on this occasion. All were in No.14 (F) Squadron. The citation reads – “These officers, as pilots of fighter planes, participated in numerous attacks on enemy installations in the Aleutians which were pressed home despite heavy anti-aircraft fire and often under adverse weather conditions. All flights were made from advanced bases and required skillful airmanship for a successful execution of the mission. The courage and devotion to duty of these officers reflect great credit upon themselves and the organization of which they are a part.” Detail providedby H. Halliday, Orleans. Ontario.

BENNETT, G. J15248. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron – Award effective 26 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated 10 September 1943. Born in St. Boniface, Manitoba; home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 20 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941 ), No.14 EFTS (graduated 4 May 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 14 July 1941 ). Commissioned 1942. Cited with Sergeant A Rogers (RAF). Medal presented 17 December 1943. The citation reads – “Flying Officer Bennett and Sergeant Rogers were pilot and wireless operator of an aircraft detailed to attack Gelsenkirchen. Whilst over the target area the bomber was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Some stores caught fire and burned furiously. Coolly, Flying Officer Bennen dived his aircraft and the force of the wind put out the flames on the burning fabric. Meanwhile, acting with great promptitude, Sergeant Rogers fought the flames inside the bomber with the extinguishers. By these means he succeeded in subduing the fire although much of the equipment including the hydraulic system were rendered unserviceable. Flying Officer Bennett flew the damaged bomber to an airfield in this country and landed it safely. His skill and resource were worthy of high praise while Sergeant Rogers displayed commendable promptitude and skill.” BENNETT, S/L Gordon, DFC (J15248)­ – Distinguished Service Order – No.405 Squadron – Award effective 14 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25th August 1944. Medal presented 1 April 1949. The citation reads – “As captain of aircraft, Squadron Leader Bennett has taken part in a very large number of sorties during which he has successfully attacked such targets as Berlin, Mannheim and Munich. He has displayed skill of a high order whilst his unconquerable spirit of determination and contempt for danger have been a notable feature of his efforts throughout. Squadron Leader Bennett has rendered valuable service.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BENT, W.T. J158454//R83055. Age at time of death was 26 and was a Flight Sergeant when he earned his DFM. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.142 Squadron – Award effective 23 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 6 October 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. American in the RCAF; born 1916 in Glen White, West Virginia; home there or Sikeston, Mississippi (miner); enlisted Windsor, Ontario, 30 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.12 EFTS, and No.1 SFTS. To No.142 Squadron, 13 May 1942. Killed in action 10 November 1942 (raid on Hamburg). The citation reads – “One night in September 1942, Flight Sergeant Bent, as captain of an aircraft, was detailed to attack a target in the Ruhr. Just before reaching the target engine trouble developed and Flight Sergeant Bent was unable to fly the aircraft above 8,000 feet. Nevertheless, displaying great courage and fortitude, he continued his mission and, after bombing his target, a successful photograph of the area was taken. On the return journey the engine trouble persisted and Flight Sergeant Bent was considerably harassed by searchlights and anti-aircraft fire. By skillful airmanship, however. he succeeded in returning to his base safely. Flight Sergeant Bent has at all times shown determination in pressing home his attacks.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BERGER, N.L. R117662. Add to the crew list WO. A. T. Downing (RAF) and WO. M.M. McCannell (RAF). Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France

BERRIGAN, L.T. J16898. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.7 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944. Home in Dunedin, Prince Edward Island; enlisted Charlottetown, 25 October 1940. Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 29 September 1941). No citation other than “completed … many successful operations against the enemy in which (he has) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Killed in action 24/25 March 1944 (Lancaster ND581); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin, 1 December 1948. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BERRY, D.E. J23034//R74338. WO1 Douglas Elliott (R74338 – since promoted to P/O, J23034) – Air Force Cross – No.2 SFTS – Award effective 28 May 1943 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. Born in Onawa, 1920. Enlisted in Ottawa, 22 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.2 EFTS (graduated 8 April 1941 ), No.7 SFTS (graduated 22 June 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 12 September 1941). Killed in action with No.428 Squadron, 2 February 1945 (Lancaster KB792); buried in Germany. n,e citation reads – “Warrant Officer Berry has been instructing in the Navigation Section at this school for the past eighteen months. During this time he has put in 1,129 hours instructional flying, bringing his total to 1,480 hours. His flying discipline has always been of the highest standard and he has been an outstanding example to his students. On many occasions, under adverse weather conditions, he has displayed tenacity of purpose in completing the exercises and returning to base safely,thereby imbuing his pupils with the required spirit for service flying.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BERTRAN, R.H. J6396. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.38 Squadron – Award effective 4 January 1943 as per London Gazette dated 8 January 1943 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Born Stevensville, Ontario, 1917; home there; enlisted Hamilton, 14 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 16 March 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 4 May 1941) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 27 July 1941). Commissioned July 1941. Award presented, citation reads – “In October 1942, this officer was the pilot of a formation of aircraft detailed to make a daylight attack on an enemy ship in Tobruk Harbour. Displaying great skill and determination, he made a successful attack scoring at least one hit on the target. His determined attack contributed much to the combined effort of the operation which achieved the destruction of the vessel. Flying Officer Bertran displayed high courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BERVEN, B.M. R106299. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.40 Squadron – Award effective 20 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Born 1918; home in Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan (mechanic); enlisted in Flin Flon, Manitoba, 28 June 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 11 September 1941 ), No.6 EFTS (graduated 8 November 1941) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 27 February 1942). Killed in action with No.40 Squadron, 17 September 1943 (Wellington HF534); name on Malta Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin, 12 December 1944. NOTE: Although the award is effective 20 April 1943, the citation refers to events of July 1943! The citation reads – “This airman has completed twenty-seven sorties and is a most determined and skillful captain of aircraft. He has taken part in attacks against targets in Tunisia, Pantelleria, Sicily and Italy. On the night of the invasion of Sicily he delivered an accurate low level attack on the seaplane base at Syracuse.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BEVERIDGE, MW. J15070. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.418 Squadron – Award effective 26 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 9 November 1943 and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944. Born 1916 in Dryden, Ontario; home in Montreal (Westmount); enlisted Montreal, 14 August 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 23 October 1940), No.13 EFTS (graduated 20 December 1940) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 3 April 1941). Commissioned 1941. To No.1459 Flight, 28 December 1941; to No.1422 Flight, 2 January 1942; to No.538 Squadron, 2 October 1942; to No.51 OTU, 9 February 1943; to No.418 Squadron, 5 April 1943. Killed in flying accident, 20 September 1944 (search for missing aircraft, No.409 Squadron, in foggy weather). Award presented to next-of-kin, 27 June 1945. Portrait painted by Edwin Holgate, Cited with Sergeant Barnard Oswald Richard Bays (RAF) who received DFM. The citation reads – “As pilot and observer respectively, Squadron Leader Beveridge and Sergeant Bays have undertaken many successful sorties against the enemy airfields. During a recent operation they shot down two enemy aircraft, one of them after a long pursuit. Their skill and tenacity were highly commendable. Squadron Leader Beveridge is a most efficient flight commander who has set a fine example of devotion to duty, while Sergeant Bays has proved himself to be a most valuable member of aircraft crew.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BIGORAY, W.W. J89731//R93566. Age at time of death was 26. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No1474 Flight, RAF – Award effective 29 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1943 and AFRO 232.43 dated 12 February 1943. Born 1918 in Redwater, Alberta; home there (labourer); enlisted Edmonton, 15 March 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 8 November 1941) and No.8 BGS (graduated 9 December 1941). Cited with P/O E.A. Paulton (RCAF), DFC. Award presented 13 April 1943. The citation reads – “Pilot Officers Jordham and Paulton and Flight Sergeant Bigoray have displayed great gallantry, fortitude and devotion to duty in exceptionally hazardous circumstances.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BIRCHALL, A. J15411. Stirling aircraft W7578 took off at 19:35 hours for ops to Munich. The aircraft crashed in France at Noyers-le-Val. Cause unknown. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.

BIRKLAND, H. J5233. – Mention in Despatches – No.72 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Home in Calgary; enlisted Vancouver. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 15 November 1940), No.11 EFTS (graduated 5 January 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 26 April 1941). Missing, POW, 7 November 1941 (Spitfire W3367). Died as a POW, 25 March 1944 (shot following the Great Escape). No citation in AFRO. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BISHOP, H.G. J92591. Age at time of death was 30. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.431 Squadron (deceased). Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1945 and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Born 1915 in Catalina, Newfoundland; home and wife in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia (toll investigator); enlisted 17 September 1943 in Toronto. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 7 April 1944). Commissioned November 1944. Killed in action 11 March 1945 (Lancaster KB853). Award sent by registered mail to next of kin by Governor General, 2 December 1946. No citation other than “completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which (he has) invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation for DFM dated 12 December 1944 when he had flown 22 sorties (104 hours five minutes), 9 August 10 2 December 1944. “As rear gunner this NCO has a quiet, efficient manner, which has been a source of great confidence to his crew. Sergeant Bishop has completed twenty-two successful sorties over France and Gennany, and possesses the ability to make instant decisions in an emergency combined with a strong sense of duty and personal courage. He has completely justified the faith which his comrades placed in his vigilance during their long, hazardous flights.”DHist file 181.009 D.5526 (RG.24 Vol.20667) has another recommendation, this one dated 24 February 1945 for a DFC. By then he bad completed 32 sorties (180 hours 29 minutes), 9 August 1944 to 21 February 1945. “As a rear gunner this officer has a quiet, efficient manner, which has been a source of great confidence to his crew. Pilot Officer Bishop has completed thirty-two successful sorties over France and Germany, and possesses the ability to make instant decisions in an emergency combined with a strong sense of duty and personal courage. He has completely justified the faith which his comrades placed in his vigilance during their long, hazardous flights.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BISSETT, F.M J16991//R956231. FS (now P/O) Jack Montgomery (R95231/JJ6991) – Distinguished Flying Medal. No.78 Squadron – Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943 and AFRO 1078/43 dated 11 June 1943. Born 1920. Home in St.Vital, Manitoba (clerk); enlisted Winnipeg, 4 March 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 18 August 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 5 October 1941), and No.3 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942). Award presented 30 November 1943. Killed in action with No.427 Squadron, 30/31 January 1944 (Halifax LV898). The citation reads – “Flight Sergeant Bissett has displayed great courage and determination to accomplish his tasks successfully. He has taken part in many sorties including attacks on various targets in the well defended Ruhr area. A fearless captain, his fine example has proved inspiring.” NOTE: Public Records Air 2/8950 has original recommendation with sorti list, dated 21 March 1943. He had flown 26 sorties (160 hours 39 minutes); recommended citation differs markedly and yet has no real added data. 8 Sep 42-Duisburg (5.15); 20 Nov 42 –Turin (9.11), heavy fires seen in town. 26 Nov 42 — GARDENING (4.00); 28 Nov 42 –Turin (9.40), many large fires seen. 2 Dec 42 –Frankfurt (8.15), small scattered tires seen. 14 Dec 42 -GARDENING (3.44), parachutes seen to open. 17 Dec 42 –GARDENING (7.00), vegetables brought back. 14 Jan 43 –Lorient (5.25); 27 Jan 43 –Dusseldorf (5.15), incendiaries seen to be well alight. 29 Jan 43 –Lorient (6.01); 2 Feb 43 –Cologne (5.08), town lit up by numerous fires; 7 Feb 43 –Lorient, many fires seen, glow observed from English coast. 11 Feb 43 –Wilhelmshaven (5.00), very large explosions followed by large fire. 13 Feb 43 –Lorient (5.31), fires seen in dock area. 14 Feb 43 –Cologne (5.05), glow of many fires seen through clouds. 16 Feb 43 (5.16), a very wide area of fires; huge conflagration. 18 Feb 43 –Wilhelmshaven (5.17), bomb bursts observed; very successful operation 19 Feb 43 -Wilhelmshaven ( 4.57), many fires observed. 25 Feb 43 –Nuremburg (8.37), incendiaries seen starting fires at beginning of attack. 26 Feb 43 -Cologne (6.05), whole town covered with fires. 28 Feb 43 –St. Nazaire (6.05), many bursts observed in target area. 3 Mar 43 –Hamburg, nine large fires counted in target area. 5 Mar 43 –Essen (5.38), large explosion followed by many fires. 8 Mar 43 –Nuremburg (7.39), bomb bursts distinguished around marker flares. 9 Mar 43 –Munich (8.23), many fires. Sergeant Bissen is one of the keenest captains in the squadron and has always shown the greatest courage and determination throughout his tour, in the course of which he has attacked some of the most heavily defended areas in Germany. He has always set an example to those who worked with him, and is a real asset to the squadron.”BISSETT, F/O/ Jack Montgomery, DFM (J16991) Mention in Dispatches – No.1664 HCU – Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BLACK, W.A. J1444. Age at time of death was 37. – Air Force Cross – No.8 SFTS (since moved to No. 1 OTU). Award made on 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born in Halifax, 22 September 1907. Enlisted in Halifax, 27 May 1940; trained at No.1 ITS, No.2 EFTS, No.4 SFTS. Presented at Buckingham Palace 29 June 1943. Missing, presumed dead, 27 June 1944 on a Mustang of No.2 Squadron, RAF; hit by flak on photo mission, northern France. The citation reads – “Flying Officer Black has been an outstanding instructor, as an NCO Warrant Officer and Commissioned Officer for the past eighteen months during which time he has completed 1,450 flying hours. His personality, his steadfastness and his conscientiousness have produced many excellent pilots and assisted in the maintenance of harmony among his fellow instructors.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BLAKE, W.V. J14132. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.428 Squadron – Award effective 28 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 10 March 1944 and AFRO 766/44 dated 6 April 1944. Born 1922 in Hamilton; home there; enlisted there 9 September 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 13 February 1942), No.4 EFTS (graduated 22 May 1942) and No.11 SFI’S (graduated 11 September 1942) . Commissioned 1942. Killed in action, 23/24 March 1944 (Halifax LW285); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award presented to his mother 28 February l 946. The citation reads – “One night in February 1944, this officer piloted an aircraft Detailed to attack Leipzig. On the outward flight the aircraft was attacked by a fighter Md before the enemy aircraft could be driven off the bomber sustained much damage. Soon afterwards three more fighters were encountered but they were successfully evaded. A little later the bomber was hit by fire from the ground defenses, more damage was sustained rendering the inter-communication system inoperative and cutting off the supply of oxygen to the rear of the aircraft. Although the aircraft became difficult to control, Flying Officer Blake continued to the target which he successfully attacked, afterwards flying the damaged bomber to an airfield in this country. This officer displayed skill, courage and resolution of a high order.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BLANE, J. D. C198. W/C. Blane was from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, not Ottawa. Detail provided by DA. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

BLENKINSOP, E.W. J3467. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.425 quadron – Award effective 11 April 1944 as per London Gazette of 21 April 1944 and AFRO 1186/44 dated 2 June 1944. Born 8 October 1920 in Victoria, British Columbia; educated and home there (chartered accountant); enlisted in Vancouver, 4 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (24 June to 20 July 1940), No.8 EFTS (23 July to 15 September 1940) and No.4 SFTS (15 October to 20 December 1940). Further trained at No.1 ANS; subsequently assigned for 14 months to No.2 ANS. Commissioned 1941. To New Zealand 25 April 1942 to inspect their navigation training procedures (not sure when he returned). Posted overseas January 1943; trained at No.3 (P) AFU, No.22 OTU and No.311 FTIJ. To North Africa, 10 July 1943 for service with No.424 Squadron but transferred almost immediately to No.425 Squadron, with whom he flew until 27 February 1944 when transferred to No.405 Squadron. Shot down with No.405 Squadron, 27/28 April 1944 (Lancaster JA976) during raid on Montzen marshalling yards; only survivor. Picked up by Belgian Underground, be obtained papers which enabled him to pass as a Belgian national. However, while in Meensel-Kiesegem a German round-up netted 80 members of local Resistance including Blenkinsop. Held at St.Gilles Prison, Brussels. While detained he transmitted his identity to an American officer POW by tapping in morse code over steam pipes. Sent to work in a factory in Hamburg. May have spent time in Bergen-Belsen. Died 23 January 1945 in concentration camp at Neuengamme (heart failure, possibly caused by lethal injection). Body cremated; name on Runnymede Memorial. The citation reads – “This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which be has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” BLENKINSOP, S/L Edward Weyman, DFC (13467) – Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm (Belgium) – (deceased) – Awarded 17 July 1948 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 455/48 dated 23 July 1948. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BLISS, O.L. R88244. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.35 Squadron (presumed dead) – Award effective 22 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1915 in Westchester Station, Nova Scotia; home in New Glasgow (garage manager); enlisted Halifax, 24 March 1941. Trained at No.6 BGS
(graduated 30 March 1942) and No.4 WS (graduated 10 April 1942). Air gunner, killed in action 23/24 August 1943 on Halifax HR.928; buried in Germany. Award sent by registered mail to next of kin, 8 March 1946. The citation reads – ”The efficient manner in which this officer has directed his captain in avoiding attacks by enemy fighters and engagement by searchlights and anti-aircraft fire has been very largely responsible for the excellent results attained by his crew. Warrant Officer Bliss has proved himself to be a keen and cool air gunner whose record of operations has been most meritorious. He has invariably displayed a high order of courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BOISVERT, J.G.L. R101506. The Hudson aircraft, from OTU RAF Thornaby-on-Tees, ditched in the North Sea off West Hartlepool, County Durham. WO. Boisvert drowned. FS. F.J.V. McGrath (RAAF) was killed in a flying accident at RAF Charterhall near Berwick-upon-Tweed on the England-Scotland border. He was the pilot of Bristol Beaufighter IIF T3361 of No. 54 (Fighter) OTU which crashed killing two. McGrath was killed on the same date as Boisvert. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.

BOOMER, K.A. C1220. He was from Ottawa, not Vancouver and his age at time of death was 28. – Air Medal (United States) – Alaska – Award effective 23 December 1942 as per AFRO 272/43 dated 19 February 1943. Born in Ottawa, 20 August 1916. Enlisted in Ottawa, 9 October 1939. Trained at Camp Borden, earning wings 29 April 1940. Sent overseas, September 1940, serving in Nos.112, 1 (C) and 411 Squadrons. Returned to Canada, April 1942. No.111 Squadron (Alaska), 17 August 1942-31 May 1943. On staff duties until January 1944 when he was posted to No.36 OTU. Posted overseas, April 1944, trained further at No.60 OTU, and posted to No.418 Squadron, 20 August 1944. Killed in action (Day Ranger), 22 October 1944. Cited in this instance with F/O J.G. Gohl, P/O H.O. Gooding, and F/O R. Lynch. See magazine Airforce, Volume VII No.2 (June 1983). On 25th September 1942, they voluntarily flew with United States Army combat pilots, accompanying heavy bombers in making a hazardous five hundred mile over water flight in order to press home an attack on the enemy at Kiska Island, Alaska. Although the mission of protecting the bombing planes from anti-aircraft fire and enemy fighters was completed, the fighters returned to strafe all enemy installations with remarkable success. All planes returned safely to base. BOOMER, S/L Kenneth Arthur (C1220) -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.111 Squadron (Canada) – Award effective 1 January 1943 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. The citation reads – “This officer is in command of a fighter squadron on detached operations in Alaska. Inspired by his unflagging zeal and devotion to duty, his squadron has maintained a consistently high standard of efficiency under difficult and trying conditions. He has displayed great qualities of courage and determination in seeking out the enemy and his flying skill has been responsible for the excellent work done by his squadron on coastal patrol duties in action against the enemy. He was the first RCAF pilot to make direct contact with the enemy and in so doing gave an exceptionally good account of himself. His services on fighter operations have been invaluable.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BOOTSMA, D.H. J15775. The squadron was attached to Coastal Command at Chivenor when Whitley aircraft #Z9477-G went down in the Bay of Biscay during an anti-submarine patrol. There were only six in the crew, the five RAF members who were also killed were P/O. E.A. Smith, Sgt.s M.A.E. Ennion, A.H. Cameron, R.G. Home, and R.G. McKenzie. All the names of this crew are engraved on the Memorial at Runnymede. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England

BORROWES, R.D. J19536//R135047. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.405 Squadron – Award effective 11 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1944 and AFRO 1075/44 dated 19 May 1944. Home in Montreal; enlisted there 30 September 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 February 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 23 May 1942) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 9 October 1942). Killed in action 6 May 1944 (Lancaster ND617); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award presented to next of kin 28 February 1946. No citation other than ” …completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which (he has) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BOSLOY, P. J11585. – F/O. Bosloy was from Sydney, Nova Scotia not Toronto. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

BOUCHARD, V.J. 185054. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.550 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 6 June 1944 and AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944. Home in Regina; enlisted there 6 November 1939. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 19 June 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 11 September 1942) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 30 December 1942). Award presented 28 February 1946. No citation other than “completed…many successful operations against the enemy in which (he has) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BOUSKILL, R.R. J10254. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.401 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born at Trout Creek, Ontario, 18 September 1915. Educated in Toronto, clerk from 1936 to 1939. Enlisted 22 May 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS
(graduated 13 September 1941 ), No.17 EFTS (graduated 17 November 1941) and No.8 SFTS (awarded wings 27 February 1942). Instructor at No.1 SFTS, 18 May 1942 to 6 June 1943. Posted to UK, September 1943. At No.57 OTU, 12 October 1943 to 10 January 1944. With No.401 Squadron, 10 January to 2 October 1944 when he was killed in action. Victories as follows: 7 June 1944, one FW.190 damaged; 27 July 1944, one FW.190 destroyed southeast of Caen; 3 August 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed south of Domfort; 17 August 1944, one FW.190 destroyed over Laigle; 25 September 1944, one FW.190 destroyed over Nijmegen plus one Bf. 109 damaged; 29 September 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged southeast of Nijmegen. Award presented to next-of-kin, 28 February 1946. The citation reads – “This officer has set a fine example of skill and courage. He has displayed the greatest keenness for air operations and his successes include the destruction of five enemy aircraft. Throughout a long period of fighter activity his devotion to duty has been of a high order.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BOYD, A.B. J46747. – F/O. Boyd was from Sydney, Nova Scotia not Halifax. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

BOYLE, H.V. J17745. Burial location was at the Castillon en Auge Churchyard, Calvados, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

BRAY, C.L. R78203. – Distinguished Flying Medal -No.103 Squadron (AFRO says “Attached to RAF ” but deceased at time of AFRO publication). Award effective 27 January 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 15 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.9 EFTS and No.5 SFTS. Killed with No. 103 Squadron on 26 April 1942 (name on Runnymede Memorial). Cited with Sergeant Douglas W. Spooner (RAAF, awarded DFM). Award presented to next-of- kin, 22 April 1944. The citation reads – “One night in January 1942, Sergeants Bray and Spooner were captain and second pilot, respectively, of an aircraft which participated in an attack on Wilhelmsbaven. Sergeant Bray carried out a determined attack in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire but, when making a second run
over the target, a violent explosion shook the aircraft and an ignited flare was blown from the rear of the bomb compartment into the fuselage where it set fire to the fabric, the floor and a seat. The aircraft was now brightly illuminated so that it was an easy target and, whilst held in a concentration of some thirty searchlights, was subjected 10 intense enemy fire. The situation began to appear hopeless and Sergeant Bray ordered the crew to escape by parachute. He then set the controls and, when making his way to the rear of the air-craft to ensure that the crew had left safely, be observed Sergeant Spooner still battling with the flames. Sergeant Bray there upon returned to the controls and skillfully and coolly extricated his aircraft from a perilous situation. The flare eventually burned its way through the floor of the aircraft and Sergeant Spooner, having exhausted the extinguisher, finally subdued the flames with bis gloved hands. He then went forward and, to enable Sergeant Bray to fulfill the duties of navigator, took over the controls. Although suffering acutely from the effects of the fumes, he flew the aircraft safely back.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BRECKLES, G.S. R212772. The correct aircraft number is EF 263. The aircraft received a direct hit from flak and crashed at St. Michielgest, Holland. The complete crew including FS. W. Moss (R.A.F.) Sgt. J. Wood (R.AF.), and Privates J. Cadle, and G. Courtney were all killed. Detail provided by Bob Middleton of Killarney, Manitoba. BREITHAUPT, W.R. J17271. Incorrect spelling of the surname, “Breihaupt” is incorrect. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No. 239 Squadron – Award effective 7 July  1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 4 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 October 1941), No. 12 EFTS (graduated 19 December 1941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Cited with F/O J.A. Kennedy (RAF). Killed in action 12
September 1944, seconds after shooting down the Bf.110 which bad set his own machine on fire. Award presented to next-of-kin, 2 December 1946. The citation reads – “Flying Officer Breithaupt and Flying Officer Kennedy have completed numerous sorties. They have displayed a high degree of skill, excellent co-operation and a fine fighting spirit, qualities which have enabled them to destroy four enemy aircraft at night within a period of a few weeks. Their achievements have won much praise.” Detail
provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BRICHTA, P.S. R72563 – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.419 Squadron – Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Enlisted in Toronto, 12 August 1940. Trained at No.5 AOS, No.4 BGS, and No.1 ANS. Killed in action 16 September 1942 while on the strength of No.22 OTU; buried in Germany. Medal presented (not clear to whom) at Buckingham Palace, 22 April 1944. The citation reads – ”This airman is an observer of exceptional merit. Throughout his operational tour he has displayed both efficiency and coolness which has been of the greatest assistance to his captain. One night in June 1942, during an attack against Essen, his aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire. It was also attacked by an enemy fighter. The underside of the fuselage from the front turret to the observer’s table caught fire but in spite of the imminent danger to the whole crew and the possibility that he would fall through the badly burned bottom of the fuselage, Flight Sergeant Brichta immediately attempted to extinguish the flames. His subsequent accurate navigation played a large part in the eventual safe return of his aircraft to this country. Flight Sergeant Brichta’s courage and coolness in the face of danger has at all times been of a high order. He has taken part in attacks on the enemy’s industrial targets and dockyard installations.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BROCK, R.G. J85520. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.50 Squadron (deceased). Award effective 23 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 26 September 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 21 November I 942), and No.1 AOS (graduated 13 January 1943). Killed in action, 24/25 April 1944 (Lancaster ED876); wife in Toronto. Award presented to next-of-kin, 2 December 1946. The citation reads -”This officer has completed as air bomber many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BROSKO, P.P. J28773. F/O. Brosko was seen to parachute to safety near Oberseebach. F/O. Brosko spoke briefly to Georges Rott of Oberseebach and identified himself as Canadian. Shortly after this F/O. Brosko was taken in charge by a member of the Gendarmerie, a Lieutenant Kramer who took him in a car and on the road took him out of the car, shot him and threw him into a ditch along side the road. F/O. Brosko’s aircraft was shot down by a German night fighter aircraft and crashed near Malsch. Detail provided by Raymond G. McMillan of Victorville, CA. USA

BROWN, W.H. J6844. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.407 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 5 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. Home in Amhurst, Nova Scotia; enlisted Moncton, 22 March 1940. Trained at No. 1 WS (graduated 3 March 1941) and No.6 BGS (graduated 18 August 1941). Killed in action 6/7 June 1944 (Wellington HQ149). No known grave; commemorated on Runneymede Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin, 2 December 1946. The citation reads – “Flight Lieutenant Brown, now on his second tour of operational duty, has taken part in a large number of anti-shipping and
anti-submarine patrols. During his second tour two submarines were attacked. An excellent gunnery leader, this officer has been of great value in training less
experienced crews and has set them a fine example by his keenness for operational flying and his gunnery skill.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BROWN, W.W .L. J16571. – Mention in Despatches – No.441 Squadron – (deceased) – Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 418/46 dated 18 April 1946. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 7 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 March 1941 ), No.10 EFTS (graduated 16 May 1941), and No.2 SFTS (graduated 8 August 1941). Killed in action 13 August 1944; buried in France. Credited with a share of a FW.190 destroyed (22 June 1944) and two FW.190s destroyed (17 July 1944). Certificate sent to his mother, 3 November 1948. No
citation. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BUCHANAN, D.JA. J17456. Pleaserefertopage84
and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross –
No. IO 1 Squadron -Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazene dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 28 April 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 2 August 1941 ), No.2 AOS (graduated 19
December 1941 ), No.8 BGS (graduated 31 January 1942) and No.l ANS (graduated 3 February 1942). The citation reads -“Throughout his operational tour Pilot Officer
Buchanan’s ability and detemtination have been ofa very high order. His efficiency as an air bomber has
contributed, in a large measure, to the excellent results
obtained by his crew. By his tenacity and complete
coolness, even in the face of the heaviest opposition, many fine photographs of target areas have been obtained. Pilot Officer Buchanan has displayed consistent courage, skill and resource throughout all his missions.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BUCK, P.L. 123022. Please refer to page 84 and add the following. -Air Force Cross -No.2 SFTS -Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. Enlisted in Ottawa, 5 September 1940. Trained at No. I ITS (graduated 22
December 1940), No.4 EFTS (22 Febrnary 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 28 May I 941 ). Killed in action with
No.426 Squadron, 12 September 1944 (Halifax NP741);
buried in Holland. The citation reads -“Warrant Officer
Buck has 1,490 hours total flying time, 1,285 of which
were instructional on single engine types. 1l1is Warrant
Officer has consistently displayed a keenness for flying and carried out every task in a highly industrious manner. He has always kept himself well informed of all innovations of nying technique, with die result dlat he has n1med out an exceptionally keen and above average type of student.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday. Orleans, Ontario.

BUCKLE, A. C2150. Please refer to page 85 and add the following. -Member, Order of me British Empire -No.3
Training Command Headquru1ers -Award effective 1
January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and
AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Enlisted in
Vancouver 4 June 1940. Killed in a flying accident, 23
November 1944. Award presented to next of kin. 1l1e
citation reads -“‘This officer, with considerable
adntinistrative and executive experience, has shown
himself highly qualified for the appointment which he now holds as Senior Personnel Staff Officer at this command. H.is wide experience, knowledge and friendly, co-operative spirit are strongly emphasized in the energetic and capable manner in which he performs all duties assigned to him.
He is an excellent leader whose endlusiasm has been an
inspiration to all serving under him. Throughout his
service career this officer has displayed outstanding
devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BULL, C.F. J20632. Please refer to page 86 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.38 Squadron – A ward effective 17 April 1944 as per London Gazette
dated 23 April 1944 and AFRO 1020/44 dated 12 May
1944. Home in Hamilton; enlisted Galt, 14 Febrnary 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 17 July 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 6 November 1942). Killed in action 6 March 1944 (Wellington MP804); no known grave; name on El
Alamein Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin by Governor General, 2 December 1946. The citation reads -To.is officer has completed very many sorties including a number of anti-submarine patrols and mine-laying
missions. One night in February 1944, Flying Officer Bull captained one of a formation of aircraft which attacked a medium sized ship in Aegean waters. Ald1ough his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire, Flying Officer Bull pressed
home his attack from mast height and obtained two hits on dle vessel. He displayed great courage and determination.’· Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.BURCHELL, R. L. Rl24720. Please refer to page 62
and note the following -Sgt. B11rchell was from Glace Bay. Nova Scotia not Vancouver, British Columbia. Detail
provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

BURGESS, D.M. 15913. Please refer to page 87 and
insert the following missing detail in this record. The
R.A.F. airman killed was die Observer, Sergeant John
Ralph Vigo11r Bones. Detail provided by David Colwell of Mississauga, Ontario.

BURNS, G.C. J16496. Please refer to page 89 and add the following. -Mention in Despatches -No.433 Squadron -Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Home in Outremont; enlisted Montreal, 21 October 1940.
Trained atNo.1 ITS (graduated 4 March 1941), No.13
EFTS (graduated 6 May 1941) and No.6 SFTS (graduaced 27 July 1941 ). Killed in action 22 April 1944 (Halifax
L V990); buried in Germany. Detail provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BURPEE, L.J. R82285//Jl 7115. Please refer to page 90
and add dle following. -Distinguished Flying Medal –
No.106 Squadron -Award effective 13 May 1943 as per
London Gazette dated 18 May 1943 end AFRO 1187/43
dated 25 June 1943. Home in Ottawa; enlisted mere 17
December 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 4 May
1941), No.13 EFTS (graduated 21 July 1941), and No.9
SFTS (graduated 30 August 1941 ). Killed in aclion with No.617 Squadron, 17 May 1943 (Lancaster ED865);
widow in Britain; buried in Holland. Award presented to next-of-kin, 12 December 1944. 1l1e citation reads -·’This airman has successfully completed a nwnber of operational sorties against targets which include the naval ports of
Willielmshaven, Bremen and Hamburg and also industrial centres in Italy. He has also taken part in raids on Berlin, Nunnenb11rg, and Stuttgart. He has constantly displayed
the utmost determination to complete his allotted task,
whatever hardships or dangers are encountered. From raids on Lorient and St.Nazaire he secured valuable photographs. Flight Sergeant Burpee has invariably exhibited coolness and courage and has performed his duties conscientiously and efficiently.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

BUSH, D.G. R97642//J39727. Please refer to page 91
and add dle following. -Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.I I (BR) Squadron (now Overseas)-Award effective 5 May 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO
1133/44 dated 26 May 1944. Home in Kelowna, British Columbia; enlisted in Vancouver, 15 March 1941. Trained at No.8 BGS (graduated 2 February I 942) and No.2 WS (graduated 4 January 1942). Killed in flying accident, 5 July I 944 (Wellington HF485, No.82 OTU); buried in Britain. Award presented to next-of-kin by Governor General, 12 December 1944. Governor General’s Records (RG.7 Group 26, Volume 57, file 190-I) has citation; notes indicate that as of recommendation he had flown 756 hours, 614 operational (118 sorties). The citation reads -This Warrant Officer, as a Wireless Operator Air Gwmer, has been employed continuously for a long period on anti­submarine operations, during which time he has displayed exceptional keenness and ability in the perfonnance of his duties. He has participated in four attacks on enemy submarines, three of which he has been credited as the one who made the first sighting.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.BUTTS, N. R8836!. Please refer to page 93 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.196 Squadron -Award effective 2 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 5 October 1943 and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Born in Newfoundland, 1919. Home in Mira Gur, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 30 April 1941. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 25 September 1942). Cited with F/O James Lyall Deans (RAF pilot, awarded DFC). Killed in action 17 October 1943 (Stirling EF960); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award sent by registered mail to next-of-kin, 29 December 1944. The citation reads – “One night in September 1943, Flying Officer Deans and Sergeant Butts were pilot and rear gunner of an aircraft which attached Mannheim. Shortly after the bombs were released the aircraft was attacked by enemy fighters. In the first attack the bomber was hit and Sergeant Butts’ guns suddenly failed to operate. Nevertheless this airman cooley gave his pilot directions in offensive action and at the same time cleared his guns of their stoppages. Further attacks were made by the enemy fighters but owing to Sergeant Butts’ skilful commentary Flying Officer Deans so manoeuvered his aircraft that one of the attackers was shot down. This officer and airman displayed great skill and courage.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.
BUTTS, N. R88361. Please refer to page 93 and note the following – WO. Butts was from Whitney Pier, Nova Scotia not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia

CABELOU, J.N. R99147. Please refer to page 95 and note the following. The correct spelling is CABELDU, age 25, #128 Squadron. Detail provided by J. Galbraith, Ottawa, Ontario.
CALHOUN, M.B. 123966. Please refer to page 97 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.405 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 16 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1946 and AFRO 244/46 dated 8 March 1946. Born 1923 in St.Lambert, Quebec; home there (student in accountancy at McGill); enlisted Montreal 12 May 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS
(graduated 24 October 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 9 January 1943), and No.9 AOS (graduated 6 March 1943). Commissioned February 1943. Killed in action 16/17 August 1944 (Lancaster P239). Body not found; name on Runnymede Memorial. Award presented to next-of-kin, 9 December 1947. The citation reads – “Flight Lieutenant Calhoun, as air bomber, has completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CAMERON, D.A.J. R65249. Please refer to page 98 the burial site is at Orne not Manche. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

CAMERON, T.H. JI 7785. Please refer to page 99 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.255 Squadron • Award effective 20 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born Leith, Scotland, 1919. Home in Sylvan Lake, Alberta; enlisted Calgary 20 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 29 April 1941 ), No.5 EFTS (graduated 21 June 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 20 September 1941). Commissioned 1943. Killed in flying accident in Holland, 11 May 1945 (Mosquito MM786). Award presented to next-of-kin, 1 December 1948. The citation reads • “This pilot has destroyed three enemy aircraft in the course of a long and arduous operational career. He has completed eighteen months of operational flying in the Mediterranean tl1eatre of war and has always shown the utmost keenness and enthusiasm for his duties. His courage and devotion to duty have been outstanding at all times.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CAMPBELL, C.S. 115235. Please refer to page 100 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross • No. I 03 Squadron• Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born in Vancouver, 1914; Trained at No.2 ITS, No.3 AOS, No.2 BGS and No. l ANS. Killed in action 2/3 March 1943 during mining operation; one crewman rescued from dinghy on 6 March 1943. The citation reads• “This officer is a fearless and reliable navigator. His conduct when under fire has proved of inestimable value to his crew. He has always endeavoured 10 concentrate his attack on point of aim and allows nothing to deter him from his purpose. Since September 1941 he has participated in attacks on numerous enemy targets including Berlin, Stettin, Emden, Hamburg and the Renault Works at Paris.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CAMPBELL, H. 185420. Please refer to page 101 and note the following• F/O. Campbell was from Florencer, Nova Scotia not Cape Breton. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

CANTY, M. A. R62966. Please refer to page l 04 and note the following · FS. Canty was 21 years old at the time of death not 20. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

CAREY, D.M. Jl6480. Please refer to page 105 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross• No. I 03 Squadron• Award effective 4 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943 and AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943. Born in Brandon, Manitoba; home there; enlisted Winnipeg 18 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 1 October 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 5 December 1941) and No.IO SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Commissioned 1943. Killed in action with No.12 Squadron, 30 March 1944 (Lancaster ND44 l ); buried in Germany. Award presented to next of kin, I December
I 948. l11e citation reads• “This officer is an excellent operational pilot and captain of aircraft, whose gallantry in the face of enemy action has been outstanding. On the majority of the sorties in which he has participated the primary target has been bombed successfully. Flight Lieutenant Carey has completed missions to most of the major Gennan objectives and undeterred by opposition has pressed home his attacks regardless of the hazards encountered.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CARLETON, E.B. J88306//R97038. Please refer to page 105 and add the following.• Distinguished Flying Medal• No.427 Squadron – Award effective I September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Born Toronto, 1922; home there Gournalist); enlisted there 28 February 1941. Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 19 January 1942) and No.4 WS (graduated 19 December 1941. Award presented by King George 22 September 1944. l11e citation reads • ((As air gunner this ainnan has completed numerous operational sorties against heavily defended targets. He has displayed efficiency and courage of high order. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CARTER, A.R. 115673. Please refer to page 109 and add the following. • Distinguished Flying Cross • No.153 Squadron • Award effective 15 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 September 1943 and AFRO 2198/43 dated 29 October 1943. Born 28 April 1919 in Toronto; home tl1ere; enlisted there 9 October 1940. AL No.1 Manning Depot, 9-25 October 1940 and Station Rockcliffe. 25 October 1940 to 3 January 1941. Trained at No.I ITS(graduated 11 February 1941),No.l EFTS
(graduated 8 April 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 20
June 1941, awarded wings and promoted to Sergeant).
Commissioned I July 1942; F/O, I January 1943; FIL 1
July 1944. Posted to UK, arriving 16 August 1941. Further trained atNo.60 OTU, 21 August to 21 October 1941. To No.153 Squadron, 21 October 1941 until 18 December 1942; Station Portreath, 18 December 1942 to 12 February 1943; returned to No.153 Squadron, 12 February to 19
September 1943. With No.63 OTU, 28 October 1943 to 12 March 1944. Took leave in Canada, 20 May to 18 July
1944. Posted to No.409 Squadron, 28 July 1944. Killed in 0ying accident with No.409 Squadron, 9 August 1944
(Mosquito HK.406 was being tested when it went out of
control; starboard engine tom out and aircraft went into
fatal spin; P/O T.C. Kewen also killed); buried in United Kingdom. Award presented to next of kin, 27 June 1945. The citation reads -“Flying Officer Carter has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. A determined and
relentless night fighter, he has consistently displayed
keenness and courage of a high degree in the course of air combat. At night he has destroyed four enemy aircraft.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CARTER, R.G. 115862. Please refer to page 110 and
add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.467 Squadron -Award effective 6 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1943 and AFRO 1849/43 dated
10 September 1943. Born 1920 in London; home in
Toronto; enlisted there 1 July 1940. Trained at No. I ITS
(graduated 13 October 1940), No.2 BGS (graduated 19
January 1941), No.3 AOS (graduated 8 December 1941) Md No.I ANS (graduated 20 February 1941).
Commissioned 1942. Killed in action, 17 August 1943
(Lancaster LM342); name on Runnymede Memorial.
Award presented to next-of-kin, 12 December 1944. The citation reads -“As navigator this officer has taken part in many successful raids on Germany, Italy and occupied
territory. He was a member of the crew of an aircraft which panicipated in the effective attack on the radio location factory at Frederichshafen and the raid on Spezia during
the round flight via Nonh Africa. Other targets to which he has navigated his aircraft have been Wuppertal, Essen, Do11nmnd and several in the Middle East. Flying Officer Carter has invariably displayed outstanding courage and
deterntlnation.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CARTER, R.E. 128855. Please refer to page 110 and add the following. -Mention in Despatches -No.431 Squadron (deceased) -Award effective 13 June 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 726/46 dated 26 July 1946. Home in Burketon, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 30 May
1942. Trained at No.6 ITS, (graduated 21 March 1943)
nod No.4 AOS (graduated August 1943). Killed in action 16/ l 7 June 1944 (Halifax NA5 l 4 ); name on Runnymede Memorial. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans,
Ontario.

CASEY, B .A. C 1061. Please refer to page 111 and add the following. Mention in Despatches -No. 5 (BR)
Squadron -Award effective 5 October 1943 as per Canada Gazette and London Gazene of that date and AFRO
2258/43 dated 5 October 1943. Home in Windsor, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 9 September 1939. Posthumous ward ; Killed 5 May 1943 in crash of Canso 9807. TI1e
citation reads -“‘This officer has carried out many
Mti-submarine patrols as captain of an aircraft and has always been keen to give the utmost help and protection to convoys. He successfully escorted a convoy out of an ice floe in which many ships became involved. The squadron received the following message from the Senior Naval
Officer of the convoy: “were it not for the magnificent
work oftl1is aircraft, I might well have lost two ships.”. While on convoy coverage patrol he was unfortunately
killed in an aircraft accident. He was unfailingly ready to accept any task and his ability and splendid work have been a valuable contribution in the success of the convoy
patrol.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CHADBURN, L.V. 12976. Please refer to page 113 and add the following -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.416 Squadron -Award effective 2 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born 21 August 1919 in Montreal; home in Aurora, Ontario. Enlisted in Toronto, 16 April 1940. Trained at No. l ITS, Border Cities Aero Club (Windsor), and No.2 SFTS. Wings and commissioned, 18 November l 940. Killed in action ( collided with another Spitfire), 13 June 1944. See H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky, for a chapter on him. The citation reads -“This officer bas led his squadron with great skill. During combined operations at Dieppe on 19th August the squadron destroyed three enemy aircraft, probably destroyed one, and damaged seven others without loss to tl1emselves. This achievement reflects greatest credit on this officer’s excellent leadership and he has inspired confidence in those under his command. He has personally destroyed one enemy E-Boat, probably destroyed a Junkers 88 and damaged other enemy ships and aircraft.” Distinguished Service Order -Station Digby-Award effective 21 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 7 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. The citation reads -“Wing Commander Chadburn has led formations on very many sorties during which sixteen enemy aircraft have been destroyed, six of them by this officer. In addition
three E-Boats have been successfully attacked. Wing Commander Chadburn has displayed exceptional
leadership and great skill, while his fine fighting spirit have set a most inspiring example.” -Bar to Distinguished Service Order -((Attached RAF)) (Digby Wing) -Award effective 30 December 1943 as per London Gazene dated 14 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. The citation reads -“This officer has displayed outstanding leadership, great tactical skill and courage. Since being awarded the Distinguished Service Order he has led his formation in a large number of sorties during which twenty-three enemy aircraft have been destroyed and many others damaged. Wing Commander Chadburn shot down six of this total himself. Much oftl1e great success achieved during the period can be attributed to this
officer’s sterling qualities.”

CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon, DSO, DFC (12976) -Chevalier oftJ1eLegion of Honour (France)-AFRO
485/47 dated 12 September 1947 and Canada Gazene dated 20 September 1947. CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon, DSO, DFC (12916) -Croix de Guerre avec Palm (France) – AFRO 485/47 dated 12 September 1947 and Canada
Gazette dated 20 September 1947. Detail provided by H.Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CHANDLER, A.J. R60718. Please refer to page 115 and add the following -Air Force Medal -No.5 Squadron
(Canada) -Award effective 11 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42
dated 3 July 1942. Home in Ribstone, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 3 June 1940. Graduated from Station Rockcliffe, 3 August 1940. Award presented 3 December 1942. TI1e citation reads -The outstanding air gunner ofNo.5 (BR) Squadron,
Sergeant Chandler has completed 446 hours of flying, 363 of which were during 104 actual war flights. For the
manner in which he has displayed never-failing courage and devotion, he is strongly recommended for the award of the Air Force Medal.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.CHAPMAN, J.R R85522. Please refer to page 116 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.97
Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 9 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO
155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1922 in Toronto;
ome in St. Thomas, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 11 December 1940. Trained at No.9 BGS graduated 5 February 1943). Killed in action 10/11 May 1944 (Lancaster JB708); wife in St. Thomas, Ontario. Award presented to next-of- kin, IO December 1947. The citation reads – “This Warrant Officer has completed as air gunner many successful
operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortirude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CHAPPELL, R.C. Please refer to page 859 & 860 and
note the following. Sgt. R.C. Chappell, LAC. W.R.
Moisley, and Sgt. T.J. Sugre all refer to I.A McNeilly. It should read J.A. Meneilly.

CHEPIL, M. Rl 17497. Please refer to page I 18 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.428
Squadron – Award effective 19 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dared 27 August 1943. Born in Manitoba, 1915; home in Edwin, Manitoba; enlisted in North Bay, 28 August 1941. Trained at No.l ITS (graduated 30 January 1942), No.3 EFTS
(graduated 27 March 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 31 July 1942). Killed in action, 2 August 1943 with No.428 Squadron (Halifax EB274); name on RuMymede
Memorial. Presented to next-of-kin. The citation reads – “This airman captained an aircraft detailed to attack a target at Le Creusot one night in June 1943. Soon after crossing the enemy coast the hydraulic system in the bomber
became unserviceable but Sergeant Chepil continued his
night. Later, one engine caught fire and became
unserviceable. In spite of this the target was bombed after the bomb doors had been opened by an emergency method. Sergeant Cherpil afterwards flew the damaged aircraft to base. This airman displayed outstanding determination and devotion to duty, setting an inspiring example.” Detail
provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CHRJSTIE, J.O. Jl 7256. Please refer to page 120 and
add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.50
Squadron• Award effective 1 September 1943 as per
London Gazene dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO
2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Born 1922 at Griffin, Saskatchewan; home in Regina; enlisted in Calgary, 17
March 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 7 December 1941) and No.5 BOS (graduated 5 January 1942). Award presented 27 June 1945. The citation reads – “Pilot Officer Christie has 1aken part in many operational sorties against most of the enemy’s heavily defended Gem1an targets.
His aircraft has bee.n severely damaged on several
occasions but d1is has not diminished his enthusiasm for
operational flying. At all times this officer’s technical
ability and devotion to duty have been outstanding.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. CHRISTIE, R.G. Rl33381/J18884. Please refer to page 121 and note the age at death was 29, add the following­Distinguished Flying Medal – No.97 Squadron (deceased)· Award effective 22 September 1943 as per Loudon Gazette dated 10 April 1945 and AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May
1945. Born 1914 in River Hebert, Nova Scotia; home in Regi.na or Edmonton (farmer); enlisted Vancouver, 8
October 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 27 March 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 31 July 1942).
Commissioned 1943. Killed in action 23/24 September
I 943 (Lancaster ED868). Award presented to ne>..’1- of-kin. 10 December 1947. The citation reads – ·’This airman has taken part in a large number of operational missions against the enemy in the course of which be has invariably
displayed the utmost courage, fortin1de and devotion to
duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CHRISTISON, W.R. Jl5143. Please refer to page 121 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.404 Squadron – Award effective 17 October I 944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2534/44 dated 24 November 1944. Born 1919 in Montreal; home in Lennoxville, Quebec; enlisted Sherbrooke, 21 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 30 September 1940), No.2 EFTS (graduated 11 December 1940) and No. 7 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1941). Commissioned 1942. Killed in action wid1 No.404 Squadron, 24 March 1945 (Beaufighter NV428); name on Runnymede Memorial. TI1e citation reads – “Titis officer has completed a large number of sorties and has at all times displayed exceptional coolness and deternlination. On a recent sortie be was flight commander in an attack upon enemy shipping in Le Verdon harbour. During the action his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire rendering one engine useless. However, Flight Lieutenant Christison completed the attack and made a successful return flight, landing at an advanced basein France. TI1is officer has Jed his squadron with great skill and has set a fine example to all.”

CHRISTISON, S/1..William Ritchie, DFC (Jl5143) – Bar to Distinguished
Flying Cross – No.404 Squadron – Award effective 30 March 1945 as per London Gazette oftl1at date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. TI1e citation reads• ”Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has taken part in a number of attacks on enemy shipping and throughout has displayed courage and resolution of a high standard. In February 1945, Squadron Leader Christison participated in an attack against an enemy force of eleven naval vessels. The ships were sheltered by high cliffs rising steeply from the water’s edge and defended by anti-aircraft batteries on the shore. In the face of fire from these guns and from those of all the enemy ships and also opposition from enemy fighters, Squadron Leader Christison led his squadron into the attack which was pressed home with the greatest detennination . His undoubted skill contributed materially to the success achieved.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CLARK, A.T. J86332. Please refer to page 122 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.57
Squadron (deceased) – Trained at No. I ITS. No.4 EFTS,
and No.13 SFTS-Award effective 25 August 1944 as per London Gazene dated 12 February 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dared 29 March 1946. Born 1918 in Montreal; home in
Lachine, Quebec (ex-Canadian Grenadier Guards); enlisted Montreal, 5 Febniary 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS
(graduated 12 September 1942), No.4 EFTS (graduated 27 December 1942) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 28 May
1943). Commissioned April 1944. Was he a POW or evader? Killed in action 26/27 August 1944 Lancaster LM278); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award sent by registered mail to next-of-kin by Governor General. The citation reads – ·’Flight Lieutenant Clark has taken part in many operational sonies which have included attacks against targets located in the most heavily defended areas in Germany and enemy occupied territory. On one occasion in July 1944, he was captain of an aircraft detailed to attack St.Leu Desserent. When twenty-five miles from the target one engine ofh.is aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Fire broke out but was extinguished and the target was successfully attacked. Shortly after leaving the target another engine became unserviceable. The aircraft was illuminated by searchlights and heavily attacked by enemy ground defences. Largely owing to this officer’s skilful handling it escaped further damage and although the hydraulic system was shot away a forced landing was safely accomplished at base. Flight Lieutenant Clark displayed cool courage and fortin1de in continuing to his target in such hazardous circumstances. At all times his devotion to duty and detenn.ination have been worthy of the highest praise.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CLARK, D.H. 16993. Please refer to page 122 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.210 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO 2138/43 dated 22 October 1943. Born 1918 in Winnipeg; home in New Westminster: enlisted Vancouver, 14 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 March 1941 ), No.8 EFTS (graduated 15 May 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 20 August 194i). Commissioned 1941. Killed in a flying accident at Pensacola, Florida, 7 Febrnary
1944 when a US Navy SNJ-4(Harvard Trainer) collided with his PBY; eight killed. Award sent by registered mail 10 next-of-kin, 29 December 1944. The citation reads –
.. For the last fourteen months Flight Lieutenant Clark has beeo employed as captain of aircraft. On all occasions this officer has displayed courage, determination and cool judgement.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CLARK, H.A. J26760. Please refer to page 123 and add the following – Mention in Despatches – No.550 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Toronto. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 25 September 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 22 January 1943) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 28 May 1943). Killed in action 19 July 1944 (Lancaster DV279). Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CLARKE, R. W. Jl 2318. Please refer to page 125 and change the spelling of Caboury – Tisieux to Cabourg -Lisieux. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

CLARKSON, O.M.W. J25795. Please refer to page 125 and note the following. The correct spelling is

CLARSON. Tiie aircraft was flying in bad weather when it flew into high ground at 1,489 feet altitude on Urra Moor 3 miles
N.E. ofChopgate. F/O. J.D.S. Barkell (RAF) was also killed. Icing is suspected as the reason tlle aircraft lost altimde. Detail provided by David E. Thompson, Middlesborough, England.

CLOUTIER, J.D.L. 122692. Please refer to page 128 and note the following; his name is inscribed on the Runnymede War Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England. COL VILLE, A.C. J21864. Please refer to page 135 and note the following. There were three COL VILLE brothers. They were; Alexander Colbome, John Spencer, and William Freebome. On Sunday, June 2, 1996, the Council of the Municipality of Clarington, with members of the Colville Family, the Rotary Club and the Royal Canadian Legion (Branch # 178), officially opened Rotary Park. The ceremonies included the dedication of the Colville Memorial Clock Tower in memory of the Colville brothers, William, Alexander and John Colville, all of Bowmanville, made the supreme sacrifice dwing the Second World War, while serving as pilots overseas in the Royal Canadian Air Force. Detail provided by F. Churchill, Carlisle, Saskatchewan.

COLWILL, W.C. R90227. Please refer to page 135 and change the crew list as follows. FS. J.F.McCallum, FS.
D.K. Potter (RAF), Sgt.s W. Bell (RAF), L.H. Bell (RAF), and A.J.V. Hunt (RAF). W. Bell is buried at Blonville Sur Mer, Calvados, France, L.H. Bell is buried in Cabourg, Calvados, France, and A.I. Hunt was lost at sea. Detail source was Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

CONNELL, W.P. R60557. Please refer to page 136 and change death to read Killed In Action. Add the following detail. TI1e squadron was based at Leeming and Whitley aircraft # Z 9229-M was on operations to St. Nazaire when the port engine failed. The two RAF members of the crew who were also killed were P/O. E.M. Hooper and Sgt. P.H. Roan. Detail from “Some OfTI1e Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.

CONNOLLY, D.F. J90369. Please refer to page 136 and note the following. P/O. Connolly was a navigator. Detail provided by N. Ford, Cornwall, Ontario.

COOK, R.G. J6276. Please refer to page 138 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.420 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1943 and AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 20 September 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 20 Febrnary 1941), No.2 EFTS (graduated 23 April 1943), and No.5 SFTS
(graduated 14 July 1941). Killed in action with No.431 Squadron, 3/4 December 1943 (Squadron Leader rank) in Halifax LK898); buried in Germany. Award sent by registered mail to nex’t-of-kin, 29 December 1944. The citation reads – “Flight Lieutenant Cook, during his tour of operations, has completed his duties in a courageous and skilful manner. His efficiency and detemtlnation have resulted in the production of many fine photographs which have given convincing proof of his keenness to press home hls attack at every opportunity. He has attacked many difficult and dangerous targets such as Bremen, Cologne and Turin and has also completed several hazardous
mine-laying sorties. His courage and devotion to duty on all occasions have been most praiseworthy.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

COOK, W. LeR. J86874. Please refer to page 139 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.626 Squadron – Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Home in Leamington, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 12 June 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942), No.7 EFTS (graduated 19 March 1943) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 23 July 1943). Killed in action with this unit, 4/5 November 1944 (Lancaster LM290); buried in Belgium. Invested with award to next-of-kin, 9 December 1947. No citation other than “completed … numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which (he has)
invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” Public Record Office Air 2/8830 has recommendation dated 1 November 1944 when he had flown 26 sorties (121 hours 50 minutes), 18 July to 31 October 1944). 18 Jul 44 -Scholven; 20 Jl 44 -Courtrai; 23 Jul 44 -Kiel; 24 Jul 44 -Stuttgart; 31 Jul 44 -Foret de Nieppe; 4 Aug 44 -Paulliac; 7 Aug 44 -Fontenoy le Mannion; 14 Aug 44 -Falaise; 15 Aug 44 -Volk.el; 10 Aug 44 -Fenne du Forestel; 18 Aug 44 -Ghent; 3 Sep 44 -Eindhoven; 3 Sep 44 -Neuss; 6 Sept 44 -Le Havre; 10 Sep 44 -Le Havre; 12 Sep 44 -Franfttrt; 16 Sep 44 GARDENING (Danzig); 17 Sep 44 -WestkapelJe; 20 Sep 44 -Calais; 26 Sep 44 -Calais; 14 Oct 44 -Duisburg (day); 14 Oct 44 -Duisburg (night); 23 Oct 44 -Essen; 25 Oct 44 -Essen; 29 Oct 44 -Domburg; 31 Oct 44 -Cologne. Flying Officer Cook, a Canadian, has now completed 26 operational sorties against the enemy, including such important targets as Kiel, Essen and Duisburg. Under a calm and quiet manner (he) has a fine offensive spirit which has been an inspiration to his crew. By setting his mind and energies on the task in hand, and with complete disregard for his own safety, he has pressed home each attack with detemlination. His personal example 10 his crew has welded them into a fine aggressive team and his skilful pilotage has given them a strong confidence at all times. I recommend, in recognition of his powers of leadership and for his fine record and devotion to duty, that Flying Officer Cook be rewarded by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

COOKE, J.C. R173576. Please refer to page 139 and add the following. -Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Flying) -No.103 Squadron -Award effective 2 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Home in Oakville, Ontario; enlisted Hamilton, 6 July 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 3 April I 943), No.13 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1943) and No.17 SFTS (graduated 17 September I 943). Killed in action 29 November 1944 with this unit (Lancaster PB465); buried in Germany. Medal presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947. The citation reads -“One night in October 1944, this ainnan was captain and pilot of devotion to duty.” Public Record Office Air 2/8830 has recommendation dated 1 November 1944 when he had an aircraft detailed to attack Cologne. Whilst over the target considerable anti-aircraft fire was encountered. Just as the bombs were released the aircraft was struck by high explosive shells. Much damage was sustained. The starboard rudder controls were severed. The petrol tanks were badly pierced and the contents streamed out. Within ten minutes the petrol supply became practically exhausted. By now Flight Sergeant Cooke had reached friendly territory. He thereupon instructed the crew to leave the aircraft by parachute. As he prepared to leave himself,Flight Sergeant Cooke saw that one of his comrades stillremained in the aircraft, having accidentally released hisparachute inside the fuselage. Height was being rapidlylost. Nevertheless, Flight Sergeant Cooke was detennined not to leave his crew member and promptly returned to the controls and attempted to effect a crash landing in a field. During his approach, with undercarriage and flapsretracted, two engines failed. Coolly and skillfully,
however, this intrepid pilot achieved his purpose andeffected a landing, incurring little further damage to theaircraft in his effort. TI1is airman set a magnificent example of skill, courage and captaincy in most difficult anddangerous circumstances.’· Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

 

CORBETT, E.S. R74882//Jl4070. Please refer to page 142 and add the following. -Air Force Medal -No.116
Squadron (Canada)-Award effective I January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born at Ganges, British Columbia, 3 January 1921. Enlisted in Vancouver, 25 October 1940. Trained at No. l WS (graduated 25 May 1941) and No.1 BGS (graduated 23 June 1941 ). Killed 9 December 1942 when Catalina 22136 crashed on takeoff. Award presented to next-of-kin in 1943. The citation reads -“Flight Sergeant Corbett is an outstanding NCO in his trade. He has completed 1,028 hours flying, of which 723 hours were on operational duties and has made 66 coastal operational flights. During a period of intense enemy activity he cheerfully accepted more than his share oft11e extra du1ies imposed on his squadron. His example has been an inspiration to other aircrew personnel.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CORBETT, V .B. C299. Please refer to page 142 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.402
Squadron -Award effective 31 January 1942 as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1942 and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944. P/P/O and Royal Military College Cadet, 24 June 1929; received wings, 19 August I 931. Graduated 1932 and placed on Reserve of Officers, 5 October 1932. Pilot Officer with No.15 Squadron (Auxiliary), 30 December 1935; Flying Officer, 30 December 1937. Flew in Battle of Britain. Invested with award by King George 14 July 1942. Killed in flying accident at Bagotville, 20 February I 945. The citation reads -‘”This officer bas led his squadron on numerous bomber escorts over enemy occupied territory in France. Throughout he has displayed great skill and leadership which have undoubtedly played a large part in the splendid protection afforded to the bomber formations. During these operations. Squadron Leader Corbett has destroyed at least one enemy aircraft and dan1aged several othe.rs. He has
also participated in numerous low flying attacks on enemy territory during which his tactical ability and fine fighting spirit have proved an inspiration. This officer, who fought in the Battle of Britain, has always displayed the greatest keenness.’· Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CORBETT, W.D. 188248. Please refer to page 142 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.425 Squadron (missing)-Award effective 6 April 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 765/45 dated 4 May 1945. Home in Edward, Alberta; enlisted Vancouver, 7 April I 942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 25September 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No. 7 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1943). Killed in action 7/8 March 1945 (Halifax MZ815); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award sent by registered mail to his widow, 5 September 1951. The citation reads -“One night in February 1945, Pilot Officer Corbett piloted an aircraft detailed to attack Mainze. On the outward journey the port outer engine became unseiviceable. Undeterred, Pilot Officer Corbett continued to the target and executed a successful attack. On the return flight the starboard inner engine showed signs of overheating. Nevertheless. skillfully using the defective engine, Pilot Officer Corbett flew the aircraft safely to an airfield in England. This
officer bas proved himself to be an excellent captain and has set a fine example 10 all.” Detail provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

COSMAN, W.N. 123397. Please refer to page 144 and add the following. -Disting11ished Flying Cross -No.248 Squadron -Award effecrive 17 November 1944 as per
London Gazene of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5
January 1945. Home in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 24 August 1940. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 3 July 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 5 Febmary 1943. Killed in action 7 December 1944 (Mosquito NR225); name on Runnymede Memorial. Award sent by registered mail to next-of-kin. The citation reads -·’TI1is officer, now on his second
operational tour, has unfailingly pressed home his attacks with outstanding courage and determination. He has taken part in anacks on submarines, a destroyer and
minesweepers. Flying Officer Cosman has displayed great skill and his devotion to duty has been of a high order.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

COTIERILL, S.H.R. J4874. Please refer to page 145
and note the correct age at tin1e of death was 25, please add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.418
Squadron -Award effective 1 September 1944 as per
London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born in Beamsville, Ontario, 30 October 1919. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 25 September 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, Regina (posted there 14 October
1940; promoted to LAC 4 November 1940), No.6 EFTS, Prince Albert (posted there 4 November 1940) and No.4
SFTS (posted there 4 January 1941; awarded wings 17
March 1941 and promoted to Sergeant). Attended Central Flying School Trenton, 25 March 1941; to No.6 SFTS,
Dunnville, 24 June 1941 as instructor. Posted to No.36 T
OU, Greenwood, 29 OclOber 1943; posted to No.I
Depot, Halifax, 15 January 1944; arrived in UK, 31
January 1944; posted to No.60 OTU, 29 February 1944; to No.418 Squadron, 2 May 1944; killed in action, 18
October 1944 with F/L C.G. Finlayson. Award presented to next-of-kin, 2 December 1946. All aerial victories gained with Sergeant E.H. McKenna (RAF) as navigator. 111ese were: 6 June 1944, three Ju.52s destroyed plus one Ju.188 destroyed; 22/23 June 1944, two V-ls destroyed; 27/28
June 1944, one V-1 destroyed; 7/8 July 1944, one V-1
destroyed; 3 September 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed.
Photos PL-29467 (in flying gear) and PL-29468 (with
McKenna). The citation reads -“This officer bas
completed numerous sorties and has set a fine example of skill, courage and resolution. One night in June 1944
Flight Lieutenant Cotterill shot down four enemy aircraft over an area in northern France, a feat which testifies to his exceptional keenness and determination. On other
occasions, Flight Lieutenant Cotterill bas operated against enemy airfields and railway installations with success.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. COWPERTHW AITE, L. J3726. Please refer to page 148 and add the following. -Mention in Despatches -No.407 Squadron -Award effective 9 June 1942 as per London
Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42
dated 3 July 1942. Enlisted in Toronto; trained at No.I ITS, No. I EFTS and graduated from No.5 SFTS, Brantford, 28 January 1941. DHist file 181.009 D.2620 (RG.24
Vol.20628) has recommendation dated 4 March 1942 for him, P/0 J.E. Lister and FS Norman John Jones (RAF).
Missing 12 February 1942 (Hudson AM598); mother in
UK; name on Runnymede Memorial. Flying Officer
Cowperthwaite with his crew, Pilot Officer Lister and
Flight Sergeant Jones, led a fom1ation attack on the 12th
February 1942 against an enemy force which was
proceeding northwards up the Channel. His aircraft was last seen by another pilot to be going down to attack one of the enemy warships. This crew failed to remm. “This
exceptional crew have been engaged on many day and
night operations and have always been amongst the first to volunteer for a difficult & dangerous mission. They made a special request to be on this operation. Flying Officer
Cowpe.rthwaite had previously attacked four merchant
vessels, two ofwhicb were definitely damaged. These ships were of 4/5000 tons each. No claim was made for the other two vessels. He has flown on 30 operational flights, 20 of which were at night Flight Sergeant Jones was on his
second tour of operational duty and had flown a total of
350 operational hours. While with this squadron he and his crew had attacked four merchant vessels of which two were definitely damaged. Pilot Officer Lister had flown 150
operational hours.” Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario.

COYNE, E.K. R212916/J94267. Please refer to page
149 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.7 Squadron (deceased) -Award effective 3 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated I March 1946 and AFRO
418/46 dated 18 April 1946. Home in Toronto; enlisted
there 16 December 1942. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 29 October 1943). Killed in action 4/5 April 1945
(Lancaster NG229); buried in Germany. Award presented to next-of-kin, 1 December 1948. The citation reads -“This warrant officer bas completed, as air gunner,
numerous operations against the enemy in the coUTSe of
which be has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude,
courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CRABTREE, C.M. Please refer to page 149 and note the following• P/O. Crabtree was shot by the Gennans as he was descending in his parachute. Detail provided by W.L. Durham, Waterloo, Ontario.
CRAIG, J. 121466. Please refer to page 149 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.97 Squadron – Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazeue of
that date and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 14 May 1941. Trained at No. I
ITS (graduated 8 May 1942), No.10 EFTS (ceased training 31 July 1942), No.5 AOS (graduated 20 November 1942) and No.7 BGS (graduated 9 October 1942). Invested with award by the King, 10 March 1945. The citation reads –
”This officer has taken part in numerous sorties against
German targets including nine against Berlin. An excellent air bomber, by his determination in the face of heavy
enemy opposition he bas played no small part in the
successful completion of many missions. On several
occasions bis aircraft has been damaged by fire from the
enemy defences.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CRAIG, W .D. R74224. Please refer to page 150 and add the following. -Distinguished Flying Medal -No.35
Squadron -Award effective 1 September 1943 as per
London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO
2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Home in Westborough, Ontario; enlisted Ottawa, 10 October 1940. Trained at
No.6 BGS (graduated 29 September 1941) and No. I WS (graduated 17 August 1941). Award presented 17 April
194 7. The citation reads -”Flight Sergeant Craig bas
completed numerous night bombing sorties against targets in enemy territory. These have included Berlin and Turin and other dangerous and distant objectives. During all these missions he has proved himself to be a most conscientious and efficient air gunner, and his constant watchfulness has, on more than one occasion, enabled his captain to evade fighters.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CRAWFORD, N. Jl2954. Please refer to page 151 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.156 Squadron – Award effective I December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO
337/45 dated 23 February 1945. American in the RCAF according to large DH.ist card, although home is given as Chatham, New Brunswick (perhaps because his wife was living there) and place of enlistment is North Bay, Ontario (9 September 1941). Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 15 January 1942), No.6 AOS (graduated 25 April 1942), No.6 BGS and No. I ANS S 20 July 1942. Killed in action with No.405 Squadron, 2 January 1945 {Lancaster PB4 77); buried in Geml8rly. Award presented to his widow. 1 April 1949. No citation other than ” .. in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CREEDEN, J.W. R64432. Please refer to page 152 and add the following. – Distinguished Flying Medal · No.407 Squadron – Award effective 13 March 1942 as per London Gazette dated 24 March 1943 and AFRO 611/42 dated 24 April 1942. Born in Brantford, Ontario, 4 February 1922; educated in Paris, Ontario which was his home. Employed at Gypswn, Lime and Alabastrine Co. Ltd in Paris. Enlisted in Hamilton, 2 July 1941. Trained at No.I ITS and No.3 EFTS. Graduated from No.6 SFTS, Dunnville, 10 February 1941. Later commissioned (Jl5353) but killed in action 16 May 1942. Award presented by Governor General, 3 December 1942. The citation reads – “On the afternoon of 12th February 1942, a force of Beaufort and Hudson aircraft carried out an attack on an enemy naval force including the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau off the Dutch coast. In the face of harassing fire from screening destroyers the attack was pressed home with the utmost detemtlnation at very close range. Although it has not been possible to assess damage inflicted owing to extremely poor visibility, it is believed that several hits were obtained. The operation demanded a high degree of skill and courage.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CREIGHTON, A.D. JI 9870. Please refer to page 152 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.49 Squadron (deceased)- Award effective 21 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1946 and AFRO 244/46 dated 8 March 1946. Home in Saskatoon; enlisted there 9 June 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 20 March 1942) and No.5 BGS (graduated 26 May 1942). Killed in action 28/29 June 1944; buried in Germany. Award presented by Governor General to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947. NOTE: Citation calls him a pilot, but casualty list and training school list make clear he is an air gunner. The citation reads – “Pilot Officer Creighton, as pilot, has completed mm1erous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the u!Dlost fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail
a
provided by H. Halliday, Orlens, Ontario.

CREW, B.G. Jl 7170. Please refer to page 152 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.427 Squadron – Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated IO September 194 3 and AFRO 2138/43 dated 22 October 1943. Home in Victoria; enlisted Regina, 26 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 23 July 1941)), No.15 EFTS (graduated 18 September 1941) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 5 December 1941). Invested with award by the King, 11 August 1944. Killed in action with rank of Squadron Leader, 5 January 1945 (Halifax NR257); buried in Germany. The citation reads – “As captain of aircraft this officer has success fully completed a number of operational sort.ies. He has at al I times displayed a high standard of courage and efficiency. His keenness and devotion to duty under difficult and hazardous conditions have been of a high order.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CRIMMINS, W.D. Jl6533. Please refer to page 153 and add the following- Distinguished Flying Cross – No.12 Squadron – Award effective 12 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943 and AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943. Home in Guelph, Ontario; enlisted Hamilton, 2 July 1940. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 14 September 1940), No.I BGS (graduated 17 February 1941), and No.I WS (graduated 19 January 1941). Invested with award by the King, 9 November 1943. The citation reads – “Pilot Officer Crimmins is a most gallant
gunner whose cheerful confidence dU’oughout his tour of operational duty has inspired a high standard of morale and courage in his crew. His coolness and determination in action have been outstanding.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CRONYN, P.H. C24436. Please refer to page 153 and add the following- Distinguished Flying Cross – No.427 Squadron (deceased)- Award effective 12 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946. Home and wife in London, Ontario; enlisted there 26 March 1941. Trained at No.20 EFTS (graduated 6 November I 942) and No.5 SFTS
(graduated 19 March 1943). Killed in action, 12/13 August 1944 (Halifax L V821, Zl..-lJ); name on Runnymede Memorial. The citation reads – “Flight Lieutenant Cronyn. as pilot, has completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the ut-most fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CROUCHER, G. J26857. Please refer to page 155 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.408 Squadron (deceased)- Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Verdun, Quebec; enlisted Montreal, 7 July 1942. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 19 April 1943) and No.6 BGS (graduated 31 May 1943). Killed in action, 28/29 July 1944 (Lancaster LL687); name on Runnymede Memorial. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944. WOP/AG and Squadron Signals Leader. Had served in Canada one year, overseas one year. Flight Lieutenant Croucher has been with this squadron for several months and has been leading the Signals Section with very great efficiency. Operationally he is exceptionally keen and an inspiration to all serving with and under him. His cheerful good nature combined with his untiring energy have made his section an exemplary one. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CROZIER, D.M. Jl6383//R84062. Please refer to page 155 and add the following -Distinguished Flying Medal – No. 106 Squadron -Award effective 6 November 1942 as per London Gazette dated 20 November 1942 and AFRO 1962/42 dated 4 December 1942. See War Service
Records 1939-1945 (Canadian Bank of Commerce, 1947). Born 15 June 1915 at Ponoka, Albe.rta. Educated in
Walkerton, Ontario; home there. Enlisted in Hamilton, 19 December 1940. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 12 May 1941), No.4 AOS (graduated 4 August 1941), No.4 BGS
(graduated 15 September 1941 ), and No.2 ANS (graduated 2 November 1941). Overseas November 1941. Killed in action 13 January 1943. Award presented by Governor
General to next-of-kin, 27 June 1945. The citation reads – ‘•Pilot Officers Healey and Pennington and Flight Sergeant Crozier were pilot, navigator and air bomber, respectively, of an aircraft engaged in recent sorties against le Creusot, Genoa, and Milan. On all occasions they achieved much success, and each in his respective role displayed a high
standard of skill and determination. Throughout the many sorties in which they have taken part, these members of
aircraft crew have invariably displayed gallantry and
devotion to duty worthy of high praise.” Detail provided by H.Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CUM:MJNGS, W.E. 120014. Please refer to page 158
and note the age at date of death is 21. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

CURRIE A.R. Rl 13684. Please refer to page 159 and
note the following. Aircraft # JD 205-Y was based at
Elvington when it was shot down. Sgt.s D.A. Clark, J.
Gardner (RAF), S.H.A. Nicholson (RAF), and F.G.
Hawthorne (RAF) were taken Prisoners Of War, PIO. A. Hagan was an evader. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England.

CURRIE, D.F. J90350//R201612. Please refer to page
159 and note that P/O. Currie was an air gunner and not a bomb aimer. Detail provided by Raymond G. McMillan of Victorville, CA. USA

CURRIE, E. C. Rl24726. Please refer to page 159 and note the following -WO. Currie was from Sydney, Nova Scotia not Montreal. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard,
Trenton, Nova Scotia.

CURTIN, DJ. 19340. Please refer to page 160 and add the following -Distinguished Flying Cross -unit not given in AFRO; (Attached to RAF Overseas) -Award effective 7 August 1942 as per London Gazette dated 21 August 1942 and AFRO 1497/42 dated 18 September 1942. American in RCAF. Born 1918 in New York City, N.Y.; home
there. Enlisted in Ottawa, 5 May 1941. Trained at No.I
ITS (graduated 11 August 1941), No.12 EFTS (graduated 25 September 1941), and No.5 SFTS (graduated 12
September 1941). Commissioned December 1941. Unit may have been either No.97 or No. I 06 Squadron. Killed in action 25/26 February 1943 with No.106 Squadron
(Lancaster R4886); buried in Germany. DFC and Bar
presented to next of kin, 13 June 1944. Toe citation for the D.F.C reads -“One night in July 1942 this officer was
captain of an aircraft detailed to attack a target in northwest Germany. When nearing the target area his aircraft was
intercepted by an enemy fighter but Pilot Officer Curtin
evaded it and flew on to the objective. Shortly after leaving the target area his aircraft was again intercepted by enemy fighters. In the ensuing engagement the rear gunner and wireless operator were badly wounded. Pilot Officer Curtin was almost blinded by cordite from a bursting shell and the aircraft lost height by several thousand feet before the
captain was able to clear his eyes and regain control. Later, when nearing the Dutch coast, the bomber was hit by fire from the ground defences. The navigator sustained wounds and the aircraft was damaged. Despite this Pilot Officer
Curtin flew on and eventually reached this country. 1n
difficult circumstances he made a safe landing in a field. Afterwards he assisted his wounded crew from the aircraft and then went off for further help. In this, his first
operational flight, Pilot Officer Curtin displayed great
courage, determination and devotion to duty.” CURTIN,
FIL. Donald Joseph, DFC (19340) -Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross -No.106 Squadron -Award effective 10
February 1943 as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1943 and AFRO 410/43 dated 12 March 1943. The citation for the Bar to the D.F.C. reads -“Since the award of the
Distinguished Flying Cross, this officer has participated in numerous operational sorties against heavily defended
targets in the Ruhr and in North Italy. During a daylight
raid on Milan in October, when attacked by enemy fighters, Flight Lieutenant Curtin skillfully evaded them and enabled his gunners to destroy one and drive off the other. On two consecutive nights in January I 943, he took part in attacks on Berlin, on the second occasion spending thirty minutes over the target to ensure accurate bombing. This officer has always displayed the greatest courage and devotion to
duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

CYBULSKI, SJ. 115531. Please refer to page 161 and
add the following -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.420 Squadron -Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42
dated 16 October 1942. Born 1919 in Jasmin,
Saskatchewan; home in Pembroke, Ontario. Trained at
No. l ITS, No.7 EFTS, and No.5 SFTS. Commissioned
June 1942. Invested with award by King George, 8
December 1942. Killed in action with No.156 Squadron, 21 December 1942; buried in France. The citation reads – “This officer has completed all his operational tasks
skillfully and with great determination. On many occasions difficulties have been encountered but Pilot Officer
Cybulski has shown great perseverance and determination to reach his objective. He has participated in attacks on
the majority of the enemy’s most important targets.”
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. DABBS, H.E. 115608. Please refer to page 163 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.IOI Squadron – Award effective 14 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1942 and AFRO 2113/42 dated 30 December 1942. Born at Forestburg, Alberta, 1922. Educated at Daysland, Alberta; home is variously given as Forestburg and Daysland. Enlisted in Edmonton, 6 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 15 May 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 2 July 1941), and No.4 SFTS (graduated 13 September 1941). Commissioned 1942. Killed on flying operations, 7 December 1942 on a Lancaster; buried in United Kingdom. Award presented to next of kin, 31 April 1944. The citation reads – “One night in December 1942, this officer was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Frankfurt. When nearing the target area bis aircraft, whilst held in a cone of searchlights, was hit by anti-aircraft fire and one of its engines was put out of action. Despite this, Pilot Officer Dabbs flew onto bis target but as the bomb release mechanism was unserviceable he was unable to drop bis bombs. Displaying skillful airmanship, he flew his aircraft back to this country without the assistance of wireless aids. With a full bomb load he made a masterly landing in poor visibility. This officer’s skill and determination in the face of adverse circumstances set an example worthy of the highest praise. He bas flown on several sorties with distinction.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DANAHY, S. 116385. Please refer to page 165 and note the correct age at death is 21. Please add the following. – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.57 Squadron – Award effective 2 March I 943 as per London Gazette dated 12 March 1943 and AFRO 616/43 dated 9 April 1943. Born in New Brunswick, 1922; home at Riverside, Albert County, New Brunswick. Enlisted in Moncton, 9 December 1940. Trained at No. I ITS (graduated 22 April 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 9 June 1941), and No.15 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941 ). The citation reads –
“Pilot Officer Danahy is a keen and dependable captain of aircraft who bas invariably completed his attacks with courage and determination. 1n October 1942, he took part in the daylight raid on Milan, an extremely long and difficult operation, during which be displayed resolution and courage in locating the target accurately. In January 1943, after a successful attack on a target in the Ruhr, Pilot Officer Danahy’s aircraft was attacked by an enemy night fighter. Though considerable damage was sustained, he skillfully evaded further attacks and flew bis bomber safely to base.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DARBY, C.E. 115601. Please refer to page 165 and note that the correct age at death is 33, please add the following. – Distinguished Flying Medal – No. IO Squadron (RAF) – Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1412/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born in Harrow, Ontario, 1909. Druggist there. Enlisted in Windsor, 20 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.2 AOS, No.2 BGS, and No. I ANS. Presented at Buckingham Palace, 16 March 1943. TI1e citation reads -“On his last sortie, Flight Sergeant Darby was navigator of an aircraft detailed to attack the German naval base at Trondheim. Whilst over the target area the aircraft was subjected to an intense barrage of anti-aircraft fire. Despite this, the objective was attacked from only 150 feet. Flight Sergeant Darby’s skillful navigation contributed materially to the success of this hazardous operation. This airman is a courageous and determined observer whose fme fighting spirit has set an excellent example.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DAVIDSON, R.D. 188096. Please refer to page 168 the burial site is at Lignou, near Couterne, Orne, France. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny, France.

DA VIS, K.G. Rll 7353. Please refer to page 171 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.83 Squadron – Award effective 30 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 7 December 1943 and AFRO 240/44 dated 4 February 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 11 August 1941. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 16 February 1942). The citation reads – “This airman has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DAVIS, J.T.J. 12936. Please refer to page 171 and add the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.415 Squadron – Award effective 12 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1186/44 dated 2 June 1944. Born in Westmount, Quebec, 1921; home in Como, Quebec. Enlisted in Trenton, Ontario, 2 November 1940. Trained at No. l ITS (graduated 23 May 1940), Moncton Flying Club (17 July 1940) and No. I SFTS (graduated 18 September 1940). Cited with F/O H.T. Thompson (RCAF, DFC). The citation reads – “As pilot and observer respectively these officers have completed many sorties involving attacks on enemy shipping. They have at all times displayed praiseworthy skill and have invariably pressed home their attacks with great determination, often in the face of heavy opposing fire. They have set an example to all.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DAVY, H.W. R107107. Please refer to page l72 and note the correction to the serial number. The correct number is Rl07107. Please add the following­
Distinguished Flying Cross – No. 156 Squadron – Award effective 19 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 30 June 1944 and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, 1921; home there. Stenographer. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 26 May 1941. Trained at No. 2 ITS (graduated 1 October 1941 ), No. 2 BGS (graduated 25 April 1942), No. 3 AOS (graduated 16 March 1942) and No.I ANS (graduated 25 May 1942). No citation other than “completed … many successful operations against the enemy in which [be has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DE COURCY, T.J. JI 7641. Please referto page 175 and
note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.443 Squadron (deceased)-Award effective 26 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Born at Mitchell, Ontario, 2 August 1921. Home in Windsor, Ontario; enlisted there 7 October 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 4 June 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 27 July 1941) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941); awarded wings on 24 October 1941.
Arrived in UK, 11 November 1941. Commissioned 1942. Served in Nos. I 18, 421, and 443 Squadrons;
commissioned 20 May 1943. Killed in automobile
accident, Germany, 7 June 1945. The citation reads -Squadron Leader De Courcy has participated in a very
large number of varied sorties. He has invariably displayed a high degree of skill and courage and throughout his
devotion to duty had been unfailing. In April 1945, this officer led the squadron in an operation against the airfields at Schwerin and Neudstadt where numerous aircraft and much mechanical transpon were most effectively attacked. By his skillful leadership Squadron Leader De Courcy has contributed materially to the success achieved. In air
fighting this officer has been responsible for the destruction of three enemy aircraft.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.DE SILVA, D.M. R95750. Please referto page 179 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Medal -No.218 Squadron -Award effective 13 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 18 May 1943 and AFRO I 078/43 dated 11 June I 943. Home in Georgetown, British Guiana; enlisted in Ottawa, 18 March 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 15 July 1941), No.12 EFTS (graduated 4 August 1941),
and No.6 BGS (graduated 29 September 1941). The
citation reads -“Flight Sergeant De Silva is an
exceptionally skillful and courageous air gunner. He has been engaged on operational duties since May 1942, and
took pan in the “1,000 bomber raid” on the Ruhr and
Cologne. On one occasion, while on mine-laying
operations in the Balkans, the aircraft in which Flight
Sergeant De Silva was flying as rear gunner was heavily
engaged by anti-aircraft fire and sustained severe damage. By his very accurate gunnery, this airman was instrumental in preventing further damage to his aircraft. One more than one occasion Flight Sergeant De Silva has attacked and set on fire locomotives on enemy tenitory and once, while on a sortie against Wilhelmshaven, drove off an enemy fighter, though wounded in the hand. He is a most efficient
gunner who can be relied upon to complete his duties
effectively.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans,
Ontario.

DEAN, C.A. Rl 08725. Please refer to page 174 and add the following -Mention in Despatches -No.46 Squadron ( deceased) -Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April
1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 11 June 1941.
Trained at No.4 BGS (graduated 28 September 1942).
Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DEERING, G.A. J17245. Please refer to page 176 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross -No.617 Squadron -Award effective 23 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1187/43 dated 25 June 1943. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 1 July 1940. Trained at No.l ITS (graduated 10 October 1940), No.l
BGS (graduated 15 February 1941), and No.2 WS
(graduated 20 January 1941). The citation reads -“On the night of the 16th May, 1943, a force of Lancaster bombers was detailed to attack the Moehne, Eder and Sorpe dams in Germany. The operation was one of great difficulty and hazard, demanding a high degree of skill and courage and close co-operation between the crews of the aircraft
engaged. Nevertheless, a telling blow was struck at the
enemy by the successful breaching of the Moehne and Eder dams. This outstanding success reflects the greatest credit on the efforts of the above mentioned personnel who
participated in the operation, in various capacities as
members of aircraft crew.” Detail provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DEHOUX, J.L. 115145. Please refer to page 176 and
note that at time of death be was 23 years old, also note the following-Distinguished Flying Cross -No.137 Squadron -Award effective 30 July 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944. Born 1920 in Quebec. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 22 June 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 July 1940), No.3 EFTS (graduated 21 October 1940) and No.I SFTS
(graduated 30 January 1941 ). Commissioned 1942. Killed in action 2 September 1943 (Hurricane HX698) after attack on lock gates at Hansleert.; buried in Holland. The citation reads -‘This officer has participated in many sorties
including attacks on enemy airfields, both by day and night, on military installations and shipping. 1n the course of his activities Flying Officer Debomc has inflicted damage on nineteen barges, three minesweepers and five locomotives. He has displayed great skill and fighting qualities.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DEMPSTER, J.McB. Rl 10183. Please refer to page 177 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Medal
No.57 Squadron -Award effective 30 January 1943 as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1943 and AFRO 410/43 dated 12 March 1943. Born 1923 in Edmonton; home in Vancouver; enlisted there 25 June 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.12 EFTS. Station Trenton, and No.I BGS. Award presented by the King, 18 May 1943. The citation reads – “As air gunner this airman bas participated in numerous
sonies including an attack on Berlin and the daylight raids on Le Creusot and Milan. One night in December 1942, during a flight over Duisberg, Flight Sergeant Dempster shot down an enemy fighter which attempted to attack his aircraft. One night in January 1943 be took part in an
attack on Essen. During the return flight his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter but Flight Sergeant Dempster drove it off with devastating fire, which caused it to fall
towards the ground with one of its engines alight. This
airman is a courageous and skilful gunner.” Detail
provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DEMPSTER, W.J. R83543. Please refer to page 177
and note the following -Distinguished Flying Medal -No.7 Squadron (deceased) -Award effective 1 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO
918/45. Born 1919. Home in Toronto (restaurant
manager); enlisted there 21 November 1940. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 20 July 1941) and No.4 BGS
(graduated 18 August 1941). The citation reads -“In all his operational sorties, many of which have been against the enemy’s most heavily defended targets, Flight Sergeant Dempster has displayed courage and coolness. He has
largely contributed to the successes achieved by his
determination to press home the attack however heavy the opposition. 1l1is airman has obtained some excellent
photographs.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans,
Ontario.

DESMARAIS, J.R.J.M. J87 l 12. Please refer to page 179 and correct the surname from DESMARIS to DESMARAIS. Please also note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.425 Squadron (deceased) . Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1921 in Sherbrooke, Quebec; home there; enlisted in Montreal, IO June 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 19 March 1943), No.11 EFTS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 3 September 1943). Commissioned 1944. Killed on air operations, 18 December 1944 (Halifax MZ538); buried in UK. The citation reads -“One night in November 1944, Flying Officer Desmarais piloted an aircraft in an attack on Bochum. Whilst over the target the aircraft sustained much damage and one engine was set on fire. In spite of this, Flying Officer Desmarais pressed home a most detemtined attac.k. The fire in the burning engine was extinguished but the propeller could not be feathered. Nevertheless this resolute pilot succeeded in flying his damaged aircraft to base where he effected a safe landing. 111is officer set a fine example of skill, coolness and determination in most difficult circumstances.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DESROCHES, J.Ol. JI 5820. Please refer to page 179 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.425 Squadron (deceased)• Award effective 14 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 1 June 1945 and AFRO 1219/45 dated 27 July 1945. Born 1919 in Montreal; home there; enlisted there 22 June 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 27 July 1940), No.2 AOS (graduated 23 November 1940), No.2 BGS (graduated 4 January 1941) and No. I ANS (graduated 3 February 1941 ). Commissioned 1942. Killed in action 14/15 April 1943
(Wellington X3763). The citation reads – “This officer is an excellent navigator who possesses exceptional courage and coolness, which he has demonstrated in many emergencies. During a daylight attack on Wilhelmshaven the aircraft in which he was flying was attacked and damaged by enemy fighters. While on the way to the rear n1rret to assist the wounded gunner, Flying Officer Desroches fell through tl1e escape hatch but caught himself
on his elbows. After he was assisted back into the aircraft he rendered first aid to the wounded, operated the wireless and navigated the aircraft to the target and back to base. He has performed his duties at all times in a thoroughly efficient manner and recently applied to be allowed to continue on operations until his present captain and crew completed their tour of duty. Flying Officer Desroches has set a splendid example to the squadron.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DICKIE, A. M R65419. Please refer to page 181 and note the following -WO. Dickie was from Thorburn, Nova Scotia not New Glasgow. Detail provided by DA Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
f

DICKSON, C.A. Jl0870. Please reer to page 182 and note the following – Air Force Cross – No.168 Squadron
(Canada)• Award effective 5 May 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1133/44 dated 26 May 1944. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 26 May 1941. Trained at No.8 BGS (graduated 30 March 1942) and No.2 WS (graduated 28 February 1942). Incident was 23 January 1944. Presented by Governor General at Government House, 4 July 1944. Dickson subsequently missing with No.168 Squadron, 15 December 1944; name on Ottawa Memorial. Incident described occurred 23 January 1944. Altl10ugh the incident report refers specifically to the captain, Dickson was part of the crew and received his award for the same action. This officer was captain of a Fortress which was proceeding one night recently from Great Britain to Gibraltar, when about 190 miles from base, under very dark conditions in cloud, his aircraft bad a violent bead-on collision with an unidentified aircraft on 23 January 1944. Despite the fact that two engines were out of commission, all four propellers bent and the aircraft badly damaged, be managed to right it, after falling approximately 2,000 feet. When they were still unable to hold altitude, he directed his second pilot and crewmen to jettison the cargo and all od1er loose equipment. By strenuous effort and skillful flying, be was able to set course for land. Although flying with a crew previously unknown to him, be guided their efforts with such confidence that every member perforn1ed bis function in a most exemplary manner. The flight back occupied approximately two hours of instnunent flying, during which the aircraft was vibrating terrifically and apparently on the verge of breaking up. By careful use of radio and other aids, an aerodrome was found and a successful landing was made with no further dan1age to his aircraft. This officer, when faced with an almost unprecedented emergency in the air, did his job and directed his crew in an extremely laudable manner. The flight back occupied approximately two hours of instrument flying, during which the aircraft was vibrating terrifically and apparently on the verge of breaking up. By careful use of radio and other aids, an aerodrome was found and a successful landing was made with no further damage to his aircraft. This officer, when faced with an almost unprecedented emergency in the air, did his job and directed his crew in an extremely laudable manner. Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DIMMA, T. W. R96009 Please refer to page 183 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Medal -No.408 Squadron -Award effective 17 November 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 November 1943 and AFRO
410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Born 1922 in Ontario. Home in Onawa; enlisted there 24 April 1941. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 28 Febniary 1941) and No.2 BGS
(graduated 14 August 1942). Presented to next of kin 12 December 1944. Killed in flying accident. 24 March 1944 at No.22 OTU (Wellington RF732); buried in UK. The citation reads -“As rear gunner, Flight Sergeant Dimma bas participated in a large nttmber of sorties involving attacks on a wide variety of targets. He bas displayed commendable courage and devotion to duty and has proved himself to be a most dependable member of aircraft crew. On several occasions his timely warnings and skilled evading directions have enabled his pilot to out manoeuver enemy fighters.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DMYTRUK, P. RI 14740 Please refer to page 185 and note the following -Crobc de Guerre with Silver Star
(France)-No.405 Squadron -Award as per AFRO 485/47 dated 12 September 1947. Home in Wynard, Saskatchewan. Air gunner, missing 12 March 1943 with No.405 Squadron (Halifax DT745). Presumed dead 9 December 1943; buried in France. Reported as having joined French Resistance; shot by Gestapo. News clippings suggest that following destruction of an ammunition train. the Germans took 1,400 hostages; Dmytruk diverted attention of firing squad by driving a car at high speed down main street of town. Memorial unveiled in Matrye de Veyre, l0December 1972. An ended by thirteen citizens of Wynard who bad received financial assistance from the provincial government after federal officials vinually laughed off a request (Onawa Citizen, 29 November 1972; Kamsack Times, 14 December 1972) Detail provided by H. Ha!Jiday, Orleans, Ontario.

DOBBYN, J.L. 118666. Please refer to page 185 and note the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.50 Squadron (deceased)- Award effective 22 March 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1912 in Melita, Manitoba; home Dand., Manitoba (farm worker). Enlisted in Winnipeg, 27 June 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 28 March 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 20 June 1942) and No. I I SFTS (graduated 23 October 1942). Commissioned August 1943. Killed in action 22/23 March 1944
(Lancaster DV384); buried in Germany. Medal presented to his sister at Government House, 7 November 1949. The citation reads – ”This officer has flown on ope.rations against such well defended German targets as Berlin, Hanover, Leipzig and Stuttgart. On three occasions bis aircraft bas been attacked by enemy fighters while making the bombing run but each time Flying Officer Dobbyn, undeterred, resolutely pressed home his attack. At all times he has displayed outstanding skill, courage and devotion to dury.” Detail provided by H. Ha!Jiday, Orleans, Ontario.

DOLBY, E.G. J17608. Please refer to page 187 and note the following – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.97 Squadron – Award effective 6 August 1943 as per London Gazene dated 17 August 1943 and AFRO 2507 /43 dated 3 December 1943. Born 1920 in Milton, Ontario. Enlisted in Galt, 30 March 1940. Commissioned 1943. The citation reads – “This officer has completed a large number of operational sorties. A member of a particularly successful crew, he has participated in nearly all the major attacks delivered against Gennany. As flight engineer Pilot Officer Dolby has attained a high degree of efficiency which has been a material factor in the successes achieved.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DONAHUE, C.J. R697 I 9//J 17152. Please refer to page 187 and note the following – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.97 Squadron – Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazene dated 11 June 1943 and AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943. Born 1915 in Lindsay, Ontario; home there; enlisted in Toronto, 23 July 1940. Trained at No.l ITS (graduated 10 October 1940), No. l BGS (graduated 15 February 1941 ), and No.2 WS (graduated 20 January
1941 ). The citation reads – “Flight Sergeant Donahue has taken part in a large number of operational sorties against German and Italian targets. He also took part in the daylight raids on Danzig and Milan. A very efficient air bomber, this airman’s skill has been a material factor in the many successes achieved by his crew.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DONKERSLEY, H. W. 18203. Please refer to page 188 and note the following – Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.69 Squadron – Award effective 8 November 1942 as per London Gazette dated 20 November 1942 and AFRO 1962/42 dated 4 December 1942. Horne in Powell River, British Columbia or Moosomin, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Vancouver 9 January 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 20 June 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941), and No.7 SFTS (graduated 23 October 1941). To No.7 OTU, 11 May 1942; to No.69 Squadron (Malta), 6 September 1942; to UK, 8 March 1943. DFC and Bar presented at Buckingham Palace, 23 March 1943. Killed with three otJ1ers 16 January 1944 when Beechcraft HB 100 went missing between No.32 OTU and Vancouver; nan1e on Ottawa Memorial. The citation reads – “This officer has recently achieved much success against enemy shipping. One day in October 1942, he attacked a tanker, inflicting severe damage. A few nights later he located and attacked a convoy of four merchant ships escorted by several destroyers. After making his attack he returned to base, rearmed and made a second anack. Early next morning reconnaissance aircraft carried [out) a search over a wide area in the vicinity of the attack and observed that three of the enemy ships were missing. Some nights later Pilot Officer Donkersley attacked one of two ships escorted by destroyers, setting the vessel on fire. Later it was learned that the ship had sunk. The success which attended his efforts deprived the enemy of much fuel so vital for the battle in Africa.” DONKERSLEY, PIO Harry Woodward (J8203) – Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross – No.69 Squadron – Award effective 26 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942 and AFRO 185/43 dated 5 February 1943. The citation for tJtls award is shown on page 188 Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario. DONNELLY, T.H. R71704//Jl 7137. Please reer to page 189 and note the following – Distinguished Flying Medal – No.57 Squadron – Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1412/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born Toronto 1920; home tJ1ere ( cabinet maker); enlisted there 20 August 1940. Trained at No. I ITS (graduated 15 November 1940), No.2 EFTS (graduated 26 January 1941 ), and No. I SFTS
(graduated 28 April 1941 ). Presented at Buckingham Palace, 10 November 1942. l11e citation reads – “As captain of aircraft, Flight Sergeant Donnelly has carried out many successful sorties over enemy and enemy occupied territory including targets at Essen, Kiel,
Cologne, Hamburg and Brest. Many of his bomber attacks have been carried out in adverse weather. He has often remained in the target area for long periods making several runs over the target to ensure accuracy of his bombing. On several occasions Flight Sergeant Donnelly’s aircraft has been damaged by enemy anti-aircraft fire but he has at alJ times pressed home his attacks with vigour, and by his skill and determination he has succeeded in flying back to base safely. His courage and devotion to duty both in the air and on the ground have been a source of inspiration to all members of the squadron.” DONNELLY, F/O Thomas Henry, DFM (Jl 7137) – Mention in Despatches –
No.405 Squadron – Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944k Detail provided by H. Halliday. Orleans, Ontario.
DONOVAN, I. I. Rl 88791. Please refer to page 189 and i
note the following – Distnguished Flying Medal – No.101 Squadron (deceased) – Award effective 25 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1924 in Collingwood, Ontario; home there (machine operator); enlisted in Ottawa, 17 September 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 11 June 1943. Killed in action 26/27 April I 944 (Lancaster 11860); buried in France. Medal presented to next-of-kin, 9 December 1947. The citation reads – “This ainnan has completed as air gUDDer many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortin1de and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans. Ontario. -26-

DOUCETTE, J. A. T. JI 5960. Please refer to page 190 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross –
No.425 Squadron -Award effective 1 December 1942 as per London Gazene dated 4 December 1942 and AFRO
2069/42 dated 18 December 1942. Born 1918 in Ontario. Home in Sudbury, Ontario; enlisted North Bay, 4 February 1941. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 6 June 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 7 August 1941), and No.12 SFrS
(graduated 25 October 1941). Commissioned August
1942. Cited with Sergeant G.J.R. Bruyere, DFM The
citation reads -“On November 6, 1942, Pilot Officer
Doucette and Sergeant Bruyere were captain and wireless operator respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack an
objective in Northwest Germany in daylight. On the
ourward flight the aircraft was attacked by three enemy
r
fighters. Sergeant Bruyere was seiously injured,
sustaining a broken leg and wounds in the chest, arm,
f
forehead and let hand. A member of the crew, when going 10 his assistance, stepped on the escape hatch and fell
through it but Sergeant Bruyere caught him and assisted
him back to safety. When the engagement with the enemy fighter was terminated, Pilot Officer Doucette flew on and anacked his target.On the retwn journey Sergeant Bruyere, despite his critical condition, advised his coUeagues on the operation of his wireless equipment in extremely difficult circumstances. Both Pilot Officer Doucette and Sergeant Bruyere displayed indomitable courage and unswerving
devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday,
Orleans, Ontario.

DOWNER, PIO William Watson() -Distinguished Flying Cross -W.W. R132482//J86143. Please refer to page
192 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.93 Squadron (deceased)-Award effective 15 April
1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 30 July 1922 al Wybridgem Ontario. Home in Midland, Ontario;
enlisted in Hamilton, 20 October 1941. Trained at No.6
ITS (graduated 28 March 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 20 June 1942), and No.I SFTS (wings on 9 October 1942). Commissioned March 1944. Arrived in UK 5 November
1942. After further training, posted to North Africa 27
May 1943. Joined No.93 Squadron on 4 September 1943. Killed in action (Spitfire 1vfi:I643) 16 April 1944;retuming from sortie in failing light over sea, misjudged height and crashed at sea. Grave not known; name on Malta
Memorial. The citation reads -“Pilot Officer Downer has flown as a pilot with this squadron throughout the Italian
campaign. In his first combat in October 1943, he
damaged a Messerschmitt I 09 and over the Anzio
beachhead he destroyed three enemy aircraft in one week. He has since destroyed two more bringing bis tolal
victories to five. Pilot Officer Downer bas proved himself a keen and determined fighter pilot He has always shown the utmost keenness to press home his attacks.” Detail
provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DOYLE, G.T. R126409. Please referto page 193 and
note the following. The burial location should read Orne
not Manche. Detail provided by Joel Huard, Serquigny,
France.

DREW, C. C. J23033//R56434. Please refer to page 194 and note the following -Air Force Cross -No.2 SFTS – Award effective 16 April 1943 as per London Gazette of 13 April 1943 and AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 7 February 1941), No.4 EFTS
(graduated 10 April 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 21 June 1941). The following citation found in Governor
General’s Records, RG.7 Group 26, Volume 57, file for 1943; it indicates he was recommended while still an NCO. The citation reads -“This Warrant Officer has been
employed as a Flying Instructor for fifteen months during which time he has always carried out his duties in a most painstaking and dependable manner. This, together with his initiative and extreme devotion to duty, has set an
example which is especially commendable. These factors become evident by the skill and knowledge displayed by
the pupils of Warrant Officer Drew. He has completed
1,400 instrnctional flying hours.” Detail provided by H.
Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DRIMMIE, G. R. Jl6306//Rl 03502. Please refer to page 194 and note the following -Distinguished Flying Cross – No.405 Squadron -Award effective 5 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born 1922; home in Vancouver; enlisted Calgary 17 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS
(graduated 25 April 1941 ), No.19 EFTS (graduated 25
September 1941) and No. IO SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941). Commissioned 1942. Killed in action 14 January 1944 (Lancaster ND423); buried in Germany. Medal sent to next-of-kin, 8 March 1946 via Governor General. No
citation other than ” … completed … many successful
operations against the enemy in which [he) displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty. ” Public Records
Office Air 2/8782 bas
recommendation dated 22 December 1943 when he had
flown 31 sorties (180 hours I 6 minutes) as follows:
I Nov 42 St.Omer (1.50) 15 Sep 43 Montlucon (5.57) 6 Dec 42 Eindoven (2.30) 22 Sep 43 Hanover (5.41) 15 Jan 43 Cherbourg (1.30) 23 Sep 43 Mannheim (6.01) 22 Jan 43 St.Omer (2.15) 26 Jan 43 St.Omer (2.40) 13 Feb 43 St.Malo (4.55) 15 Feb 43 Dunkirk (1.50) 30 Jul 43 Remscheld (6.10) 2 Aug 43 Hamburg (6.25) 9Aug43 Mannheim(8.14) 10 Aug 43 Nuremburg (8.55) 12 Aug 43 Milan (9.45) 4 Oct 43 Frankfurt (5.46)
8 Oct 43 Hanover (5.18)
18 Oct 43 Hanover (5.57)
20 Oct 43 Leipzig (6.53)
22 Oct 43 Kassel (4.50) 3 Nov 43 Cologne (4.31) 10Nov43 Modane(7.10)
22 Nov 43 Berlin (6.21) 23 Nov 43 Berlin (6.02) 17 Aug 43 Peenemunde (7.35) 26 Nov 43 Berlin (7.06) 22 Aug 43 Leverkusen (6.45) 23 Aug 43 Berlin (8.10)
27 Aug 43 Nuremburg (8.45) 3 Dec 43 Leipzjg (6.32) 16 Dec 43 Berlin (7 .11)
This pilot has displayed coolness and devotion to duty of a very high order during the many operational sorties he has carried out with this squadron. He has set a high example to his crew and to the rest of the squadron. He bas participated in attacks on 1110s1 of the enemy’s heavily defended targets including
Leipzjg, Frankfurt, Mannheim and Berlin. This officer is strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DUBETZ, L. R76935. Please refer to page 196 and add the following. The squadron was based al Elvington when Halifax aircraft # JB 783-N was shot down during a night raid. Sgts A.R. Camburn (RAF), R.E. Hawkins (RAF),
T.T. Jardine (RAF), and J.K. Hendry (RAF) were also
killed. Sgt.s N.A. Feameybough (RAF) and A.J. Butlin (RAF) were taken Prisoners Of War. This completes this crew list. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy
Walker, Kent, England. DUFFY, W. A. 17073. Please refer to page 197 and
note the following• Distinguished Flying Cross • No.617 Squadron (deceased)• Award effective 22 August 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2274/44 dated 20 October 1944. Born 1922 in Puliruco, Nova Scotia;
home in Fredericton or Wolfeville, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Moncton, 16 November 1940. Trained at No.I ITS
(graduated 4 May 1941), No.3 EFTS (graduated 21 June
I 941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 1 September 1941).
Commissioned 1941. See DHist file 181.009 d.1354
(RG.24 Vol.20597) which contains correspondence re his death. Arrived UK, 14 October 1941; to No.20 OTU, 4
November 1941; to No.214 Squadron, 29 April 1942; to No.57 Squadron, 3 May 1942. Remained with that unit to I 9 September 1942, flying 33 sorties (26 to Germany, one to France, six minelaying). To No.22 OTU
(non-operational tour) where he remained until 4 January 1944. To No.617 Squadron, completing his tour on 6 July 1944 ( one special sortie, ten night sorties to France, four day sorties to France, one sortie to Germany, and four recalls (two Ju.88s destroyed on one of these recalls). At his own request he carried out four additional missions, two on Lancasters (17 and 20 July) and two on Mosquitos (31 July and 4 August 1944). On the morning of 7 August 1944 he was killed on Mosquito NT202 at Wainfleet during bombing exercise; wing failed as aircraft recovered from dive. Correspondence arose when his mother,
Mrs.L.L. Duffy, wrote RCAF Headquarters• We feel it was very W1Wise as well as unkind for the RAF to allow our son to go on with air operations after he had finished a second tour. After so much nerve strain I would not expect him to be at his best. His receiving the DFC on July 18th as an immediate award has not been explained so it looks to us a sort of bait to encourage him to continue. In a letter to us written on July 24th he wrote that the RCAF were after him to finish. One would think he had done quite enough when he had lived through two tours and a year of instructing which he did not like. Medal presented to his father, Reverend L.L. Duffy, Wolfeville, 1 December 1944. The citation reads • “Recently this officer piloted an aircraft detailed to attack an enemy target in Northern France. The operation called for a high degree of resolution and to ensure success, accuracy was essential. In the face of considerable anti-aircraft opposition, Flying Officer Duffy made three runs over the target before releasing his bomb which exploded within a foot of the centre of the objective. He displayed great courage and devotion to duty, setting a very fine example. Flying Officer Duffy has completed a large number of sorties and has achieved much success.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DUFTON, D.W. RI 19305. Please refer to page 197 and note the following. Aircraft# JD 195-A. The six RAF crew members who were also killed were; W/O. E.J. Clinch, Sgt.s M. Griffiths, M. Gray, F.J. Gallantree, J.A. Bacon, and P/O. H.C. Hoyne. Clinch, Hoyne, Gallantree and Dufton are all listed at Runnymede, Griffiths, Gray, and Bacon are all buried in the Vemeuil-sur Avree Communal Cemetery, France. Detail from “Some Of The Many” by Roy Walker, Kent, England. DUGGAN, J.P. 135871. Please refer to page 197 and I
note the following· DUGGAN, FL John Philip (135871) • Distinguished Flying Cross• No.431 Squadron (deceased) • Award effective 21 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 1 March 1946 and AFRO 4 I 8/46 dated 18 April 1946. Born 1918 in Petrolia, Ontario; home in London, Ontario; enlisted there 12 September 1941. Trained at No.I ITS (graduated 28 February 1942), No. IO EFTS (graduated 22 May 1942), and No.16 SFTS (graduated 11 September 1943). Commissioned June 1944. Killed in action 22 March 1945 (Lancaster KB808, buried in Germany). Medal sent to next-of-kin via Government House, June 1955. The citation reads• “This officer has completed, as pilot, numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude and devotion to duty.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.

DUNN, L. J. J88709//Rl 78837. Please refer to page 201 and note the following• PIO. Dunn was from Lyons
Brook, Pictou County. Detail provided by D.A. Stallard, Trenton, Nova Scotia.

DUNPHY, R. J. Jl 3843. Please refer to page 201 and note the following• DUNPHY FIL Roderick James
(113843) • Distinguished Flying Cross No.426 Squadron (dead)• Award effective I 9 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 8 May 1945 and AFRO 1219/45 dated 27 July 1945. Born 1923 in Souris, Manitoba; home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 12 September 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 10 April 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 28 August 1942). Commissioned 1942. Navigator to FS S.J. Stuart. Killed in action 20/21 December 1943 (Lancaster LL630). Medal presented at Government House, 7 November 1949 to his father, Kenneth A. Dunphy. Incident described in citation took place 20 October 1943 (Halifax D/426). took place 20 October 1943 (Halifax D/426). The citation reads• “Flight Lieutenant Dunphy has taken part in numerous operational sorties, the majority of which have been directed against major German targets. During a mission to Leipzig in October 1943, his aircraft was twice engaged by enemy fighters and sustained in all seven attacks. The aircraft suffered severe damage and all the navigational instruments were destroyed. Despite this, Flight Lieutenant Dunphy by superb navigation directed the pilot to the target and back to base. This officer has invariably shown a high degree of skill and courage.” Detail provided by H. Halliday, Orleans, Ontario.