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KERBY, Harold Spencer, DSC, AFC Group Captain, SEE DESCRIPTION, 02201 Mention in Despatches RAF WWII
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KERBY, G/C Harold Spencer, DSC, AFC (02201) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941. Born in Hamilton, 14 May 1893; home in Calgary where his father was mayor (mechanical engineer); attended University of Toronto; joined RNAS, February 1915; at Hendon, 21 March 1915; Chingford, 4 May 1915; taken on strength of No.3 (N) Squadron in Dardenelles, 12 June 1915; wounded there, 26 November 1915; Flight Lieutenant, December 1915. To Cranwell, 27 November 1916. To France, December 1916; to Dover Air Station, 19 January 1917; to Dunkirk (No.9 Naval Squadron), 28 January 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 29 March 1917. To AG and FS, Midlands Area, 18 May 1918; to Air Ministry, 20 November 1918; to No.4 Flying School, 20 November 1918 (commanding ?); to BEF, 23 March 1919; to No.4 Flying School, 8 April 1919. Reported once to have thrown his life preserver to a downed German pilot following scrap with eight. Also reported to have taken a brief medical discharge in 1917 before getting back in. Awarded DSC (2 November 1917, 'For the great courage and initiative shown by him on many occasions, notably on the 12th August, 1917, when he attacked hostile machines returning from a raid on England. One hostile machine was driven down by him to the water, where it was observed to turn over' and AFC (1 January 1919, no citation). Remained in RAF postwar. Promoted to Group Captain, 1 January 1939 and to Air Commodore, 1 March 1941; to Air Vice-Marshal, 5 March 1943. Commanded No.72 Wing, Advanced Air Striking Force, September 1939 and No.71 Wing, AASF, from 16 March 1940 onwards. Later AOC Air Headquarters, East Africa and Coastal Command; retired 1946; died 8 January 1963. Air Ministry Bulletin 2636 refers. AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943 (reporting CB) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. KERBY, A/V/M Harold Spencer (02201) - Companion, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943. KERBY, A/M Harold Spencer (02201) - Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer (United States) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1946.
RING, Spencer Leonard Flight Lieutenant, Photographic Development Unit, Heston, 39031 Distinguished Flying Cross RAF WWII
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RING, F/L Spencer Leonard (39031) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Photographic Development Unit, Heston - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 July 1940. Born in Regina, 20 September 1910; home there; married in UK. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 24 August 1938. Served with No.12 Squadron, 2 September 1939 to 21 February 1940; with PDU, 21 February to 27 December 1940. Subsequent career uncertain, although he appears to have been with Ferry Command, March to July 1941, delivering B-17 AN522 (April-May 1941), Liberator AM260 (June 1941), Liberator AM262 (June 1941) and Hudson AM762 (June 1941). Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 1251 refers. No citation other than 'for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations'. Originally recommended 14 July 1940. Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommended citation: This officer has carried out over twenty operational flights from Heston and several from bases in France. All were undertaken in unarmed, single-engined aircraft without W/T at very great altitudes often in bad weather. His success is due to his skill and determination as a pilot. RING, W/C Spencer Leonard (39031) - Air Medal (United States) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944.
GEORGE, Cecil Spencer Sergeant, No.10 Squadron, 915708 Distinguished Flying Medal RAF WWII
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GEORGE, Sergeant Cecil Spencer (915708) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.10 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1942. Public Record Office Air 2/9578 has a recommendation dated 20 November 1941 when he had flown 27 sorties (187 operational hours). Died 6 January 1942. The form identifies him as being Canadian. However, Commonwealth War Graves Commission give his next of kin as Samuel Cecil and Ethel George of Plymouth (where he was buried) and Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency confirm he has no Canadian connection.
KERBY, Harold Spencer Flight Lieutenant, SEE DESCRIPTION, SEE DESCRIPTION Distinguished Service Cross British Flying Services WWI
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KERBY, Flight Lieutenant Harold Spencer - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1917. Born in Hamilton, 14 May 1893; home in Calgary where his father was mayor (mechanical engineer); attended University of Toronto; joined RNAS, February 1915; at Hendon, 21 March 1915; Chingford, 4 May 1915; taken on strength of No.3 (N) Squadron in Dardenelles, 12 June 1915; wounded there, 26 November 1915; Flight Lieutenant, December 1915. To Cranwell, 27 November 1916. To France, December 1916; to Dover Air Station, 19 January 1917; to Dunkirk (No.9 Naval Squadron), 28 January 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 29 March 1917. To AG and FS, Midlands Area, 18 May 1918; to Air Ministry, 20 November 1918; to No.4 Flying School, 20 November 1918 (commanding ?); to BEF, 23 March 1919; to No.4 Flying School, 8 April 1919. Reported once to have thrown his life preserver to a downed German pilot following scrap with eight. Also reported to have taken a brief medical discharge in 1917 before getting back in. Remained in RAF postwar and commanded British Advanced Air Striking Force in France, 1939-1940; also AOC Air Headquarters, East Africa and Coastal Command; retired 1946; died 8 January 1963. Awarded CB, 2 June 1943. For the great courage and initiative shown by him on many occasions, notably on the 12th August, 1917, when he attacked hostile machines returning from a raid on England. One hostile machine was driven down by him to the water, where it was observed to turn over. KERBY, Major Harold Spencer - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.
JENKINS, William Spencer Flight Lieutenant, No.33 Air Navigation School, Hamilton, Ontario, RAF 45650 Air Force Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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JENKINS, F/L William Spencer (RAF 45650) - Air Force Cross - No.33 Air Navigation School, Hamilton, Ontario - Awarded 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. This officer has been employed on flying instruction for more than two years, during which time he has carried out his duties in an outstanding manner. He is an excellent Flight Commander and by his ability as a pilot and his devotion to duty he has gained the respect of all other personnel in the school. Flight Lieutenant Jenkins has completed 1,240 flying hours by day and night.
ALLAN, Spence Anderson Wing Commander, Executive Assistant to Air Member for Personnel, C2338 Member, Order of the British Empire RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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ALLAN, W/C Spence Anderson (C2338) - Member, Order of the British Empire - Executive Assistant to Air Member for Personnel. Award effective 26 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, 20 February 1906 (birth date in Who’s Who in Canada, 1966); educated there and University of Toronto; home there. Served in Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Non-Permanent Active Militia, 1930-1940; enlisted in RCAF in Hamilton, 1 July 1940 in Administration Branch. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 May 1941. At AFHQ as of 27 October 1941. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 July 1942. Promoted Wing Commander, 1 July 1943. To No.1 Training Command, 15 July 1944. Promoted Group Captain, 1 December 1944. To No.1 Air Command, 15 January 1945. To No.4 Release Centre, 11 March 1945. Retired 20 March 1945. Medal presented February 1945. Postwar he was President and Managing Director of Reid Press Limited, Hamilton. Photo PL-8956 shows him at desk, 29 May 1942 when he was a Flight Lieutenant. Died in Hamilton, 25 September 2006. This officer has contributed outstanding meritorious service throughout his career. His work in connection with the organization of all Bombing and Gunner Schools was the of the highest order and performed under circumstances demanding an exceptional degree of initiative and capacity for work. As Executive Assistant to the Air Member for Personnel, he has continued to display exceptional ability and untiring effort in the organization and maintenance of the administration of this Division. He served as Assistant Secretary for the Air Training Conference two years ago and, due to his fine work at that time, was again chosen as Secretary for the recent conference held with representatives of the United Kingdom. His initiative, ability and devotion to duty have been outstanding and an excellent example to all those with whom he has come in contact.
CUMMINGS, Russell Spence Flying Officer, No.431 Squadron, J28886 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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CUMMINGS, F/O Russell Spence (J28886) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 24 June 1923 in Calgary. Home in Britannia Bay, Ontario; enlisted Ottawa, 20 April 1942 and posted to No.5 Manning Depot, Lachine. To No.4 Manning Depot, Quebec, 3 June 1942. To No.5 ITS, Belleville, 16 August 1942; graduated 24 October 1942 when promoted LAC. To No.13 EFTS, St. Eugene, 7 November 1942. Ceased training and posted to Composite Training School, Trenton, 10 January 1943. To No.1 BGS, Jarvis, 4 April 1943; to No.4 AOS, London, Ontario, 7 June 1943; graduated and commissioned, 6 August 1943. To “Y” Depot, 6 August 1943. Embarked from Halifax, 26 August 1943. Disembarked in Britain, 1 September 1943. To No.9 (Observer) AFU, 2 November 1943. To No.82 OTU, 4 January 1944. Promoted Flying Officer, 6 February 1944. To No.61 Base, 30 April 1944. Attached to No.1666 Conversion Unit, 7-30 May 1944. To No.431 Squadron, 30 May 1944. Attached to Bombing Leader Course, 30 September to 25 October 1944. To Overseas Headquarters, 1 May 1945. Repatriated 31 July 1945. Released 15 September 1945. Attended University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall, 1946-1949. Called from Reserve for duty as a Legal Officer, AFHQ, 23 May to 31 October 1950. Joined Permanent RCAF, 9 March 1953 in Ottawa, Supply Branch with rank of Flying Officer. To Officer School, London, Ontario, 19 March 1953. To Station London, 23 May 1953. To No.2 Composite Training School, Aylmer, 19 September 1953. To No.7 Supple Depot, Namao, 8 January 1954. To Air Material Command, 20 July 1957. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 January 1959. To Langar, England, 10 August 1961. To No.2 Fighter Wing, 27 January 1963. To No.5 AMU, Marville, 29 June 1964. To Station Clinton, 14 August 1965. Retired to Winnipeg, 25 January 1971. Died in London, Ontario, 18 September 1995. Award presented 10 December 1947. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 9 November 1944 when he had flown 28 sorties (159 hours 50 minutes), 6 June to 4 November 1944. // This officer, as Air Bomber, has completed 28 operations against the enemy, including such heavily defended targets as Bochum, Sterkrade, Kiel and Stuttgart. At all times, Flying Officer Cummings has operated with a very high degree of accuracy. Through his aggressive spirit and high sense of crew co-operation, this officer has made a notable contribution to a successful crew who have rained telling blows on the enemy. In recognition of Flying Officer Cummings' cool courage and devotion to duty and his steadiness under fire, I recommend that he be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. // The sortie list was as follows: // 6 June 1944 - Conde-sur-Noireux (6.00) // 7 June 1944 - Versailles (5.10) // 10 June 1944 - Versailles (5.50) // 14 June 1944 - Cambrai (4.15) // 15 June 1944 - Boulogne (4.05) // 16 June 1944 - Sterkrade (4.50) // 27 June 1944 - Wizernes (3.55) // 4 July 1944 - Biennais (4.15) // 5 July 1944 - Biennais (3.50) // 12 July 1944 - Bremont (4.10) // 17 July 1944 - Caen (4.30) // 18 July 1944 - Vaires (4.50) // 20 July 1944 - Anderbelk (3.35) // 25 July 1944 - Stuttgart (8.45) // 7 August 1944 - Caen (4.15) // 8 August 1944 - Foret de Chantilly (5.00) // 9 August 1944 - La Breteque (4.10) // 10 August 1944 - La Pallice (4.10) // 12 August 1944 - La Neuville (3.55) // 14 August 1944 - Falaise (4.15) // 15 August 1944 - Soesterburg (3.40) // 31 August 1944 - Ile de Cezembre (5.05) // 15 September 1944 - Kiel (6.05) // 18 September 1944 - Domberg (3.45) // 25 September 1944 - Calais (4.50) // 27 September 1944 - Sterkrade (5.30) // 1 November 1944 - Oberhausen (5.50) // 4 November 1944 - Bochum (5.15) // Notes: Application for Operational Wing dated 23 March 1945 claimed 33 sorties(164 hours 45 minutes), 30 May 1944 to 21 March 1945. // On repatriation form dated 4 July 1945 he stated he had flown 33 sorties (160 hours 35 minutes), the last on 20 March 1945. Also 198.09 non-operational time. Types experienced were Anson 28 hours 25 minutes), Wellington (87.40), Halifax (205.24) and Lancaster (37.15). // Training: Interviewed 19 March 1942 by F/O D.R. MacLelland - “Average applicant, interesting talk. Eager to join aircrew - appears reliable - interested in aerodynamics, theory of flight, etc. throughout school.” // Attended No.4 AOS, 28 June to 6 August 1943. Anson aircraft - 20.00 by day and 20.05 by night. Graded in Air Work as follows -Air Navigation, Day (139/200), Air Navigation, Night (160/200), Bombing (203/300), Photography (220/300). Ground school marks were in Air Navigation, Elements (159/200), Aircraft Recognition (238/250), Signals, Practical (250/250), Reconnaissance (135/150) and Photography (105/150).
EARL, Russell Spencer Flying Officer, No.424 Squadron, J86872 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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EARL, F/O Russell Spencer (J86872) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born on a farm near Roche Percee, Saskatchewan, 28 October 1923; home in Pinto, Saskatchewan (farmer). Enlisted in Regina, 29 May 1942 and posted to No.2 Manning Depot. To No.5 BGS (non-flying duties), 18 July 1942. To No.7 ITS, 10 October 1942; graduated and promoted LAC, 18 December 1942; to No.6 EFTS, 9 January 1943; graduated 5 March 1943 and posted next day to No.4 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 25 June 1943. To “Y” Depot, date uncertain; to United Kingdom, 15 July 1943. Commissioned 24 May 1944. Repatriated 2 August 1945. Released 29 September 1945. Postwar an Immigration Officer at North Portal, Saskatchewan for 25 years, retiring 28 December 1985. Died in Estevan, Saskatchewan, 27 December 2011. No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy." DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 September 1944 when he had flown 28 sorties (146 hours 50 minutes) between 24 March and 28 August 1944. Flying Officer Earl has shown exceptional determination and courage in carrying out his operational duties. He has been an inspiration to the members of his crew and has set a fine example to other Captains of aircraft in the Flight. He has completed 28 sorties over enemy territory, some of which were carried out over heavily defended German targets such as Stuttgart, Hamburg, Runswick and Kiel... The sortie list was as follows: 24 March 1944 - Campgeine (5.45) 26 March 1944 - Roven (4.55) 31 May 1944 - Cherbourg (4.25) 5 June 1944 - Haulbourg (5.05) 7 June 1944 - Lorient (6.10) 8 June 1944 - Mayenne (5.35) 10 June 1944 - Versailles (6.05) 14 June 1944 - Cambrai (5.40) 16 June 1944 - Sautrecourt (4.30) 17 June 1944 - Oisemont (4.50) 21 June 1944 - Oiswmont (5.30) 27 June 1944 - Wizernes (3.45) 28 June 1944 - Metz (7.25) 9 July 1944 - Ardouval (4.05) 12 July 1944 - Bremont (4.35) 18 July 1944 - Caen (4.45) 20 July 1944 - Ferme du Grande Bois (3.40) 24 July 1944 - L’Hey (3.20) 25 July 1944 - Stuttgart (9.40) 28 July 1944 - Hamburg (6.00) 8 August 1944 - L’Hey (3.40) 12 August 1944 - Brunswick (5.40) 14 August 1944 - Potigny (4.20) 15 August 1944 - Tassily (4.15) 16 August 1944 - Kiel (5.10) 18 August 1944 - Connatre (6.50) 25 August 1944 - Brest (6.20) 28 August 1944 - Brest (4.30) See http://www.thememoryproject.com/stories/570:russell-spencer-russ-earl/ for an interview conducted by The Memory Project. The site includes a photo of his crew - Left to Right - Jack Johnson, Engineer; Vince (Harry) Vincent, Navigator (awarded DFC); Jake Feist, Wireless Operator; Jim Kinnard, Bomb Aimer; Art Reishman, Mid-Upper Gunner; Russ Earl, Pilot; Larry Bucoviz, Rear Gunner. The following text also appears on the site: When I was going to school, especially on weekends, when I didn’t have to go to school, if I heard an airplane, I would look around until I found it and followed it until it was out of sight. And at that time, I just felt, boy, would I love to be able to fly one of those. When I was posted to Skipton [-on-Swale, England], the 424 Squadron, that was on the 30th of May of 1944. On the 7th of June, which was the day after D-Day, we were called over the station speaker system to report for a briefing. We were kind of surprised because we were a green crew and you didn’t put green crews on operations. But we went down there anyway and the briefing officer said, this is a very important trip for you. It was a mining trip or gardening they called it, to Lorient, France. Which is on the west coast of France. There was some U-boats in there getting recharged intended to go out into the Atlantic and up into the English Channel, to prey on the supply ships going across for the troops. We had to fly that trip with our bomb doors open because the mines are too big to get the bomb doors closed. We made that trip and we had to use a GEE [Generalized Estimation Equation], which is a navigator’s instrument. But when we got to the English Channel, which we had to cross, the GEE went haywire and it was no good, so the bomb aimer and the navigator worked together to plot the course to an aiming point on the coast. Because below in the moonlit night, you could see the coast of Europe quite plain. We used that and then we, well, when it come to that at any point, we released the mines and we could close the bomb doors then, which everybody was happy about. Especially me, while I was flying that plane. And we returned to briefing, to the station and we went in for debriefing. They were surprised that we were asked to go on that operation because only crews with 18 operations or more were scheduled to fly that trip. So we felt pretty good about that. And later on, my engineer was in the library looking for a book to read and he came across a book by a German submarine ace. And while he was leafing through the book, he’d come across a chapter by, on Lorient Harbour. And that’s that trip we made. So he found out in that section of a book that, those U-boats, did try to go out into the Atlantic and then up to the English Channel and one made it through the mines but was detected by a British frigate and it sunk. The rest of them were so badly damaged in the minefield, they returned to port at Lorient and never tried it again. And we were very happy finding that out because it’s the only time we found out about one of our trips that we made.
JOWETT, Moris Spencer Flight Sergeant, No.431 Squadron, R201444 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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JOWETT, FS (now P/O) Moris Spencer (R201444) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 5 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Born 28 May 1925 in Rochdale, Lancashire; home at Eaton Rapids, Michigan. Enlisted in Windsor, 3 February 1943 and posted to No.2 Manning Depot. To No.11 SFTS (guard), 24 March 1943. To No.3 Repair Depot, 14 May 1943. To No.7 ITS, 26 June 1943; graduated and promoted LAC, 3 September 1943 but not posted to No.1 Air Gunner Ground Training School until 1 October 1943; to No.3 BGS, 12 November 1943; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 23 December 1943. To “Y” Depot, 14 January 1944. To No.4 Aircrew Graduate Training School, 16 January 1944. To “Y” Depot, Lachine, 11 February 1944. Taken on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 5 March 1944. Commissioned 3 April 1945. Repatriated 9 July 1945. To No.1 Composite Training School, 20 July 1945. Promoted Flying Officer, 3 October 1945. Retired 23 November 1945. Lived in Michigan most of his life but moved to Canada in 1998. Died in Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, 15 May 2008. Cited with FS Donald E. Gwynne-Vaughan (RCAF air gunner), which see for citation. // DHist file 181.009 D.1634 (RG.24 Volume 20604) has recommendation by W/C W.F. McKinnon dated 27 March 1945 when he had flown 36 sorties (227 hours 49 minutes): // 7 August 1944 - Caen (4.05) // 11 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (5.05) // 14 August 1944 - Falaise (4.51) // 15 August 1944 - Soesterburg (4.00) // 18 August 1944 - Bremen (5.09) // 18 August 1944 - name of target indecipherable (5.50) // 25 August 1944 - Brest (4.56) // 27 August 1944 - Marquis (3.20) // 31 August 1944 - Cezembre (5.19) // 18 September 1944 - Domburg (4.27) // 20 September 1944 - Calais (3.18) // 25 September 1944 - Calais (5.00) // 28 September 1944 - Cap Gris Nez (3.45) // 4 October 1944 - Bergen name of target indecipherable (6.59) // 6 October 1944 - Dortmund (7.02) // 14 October 1944 - Duisburg (5.32) // 14 October 1944 - Duisburg (6.10) // 15 October 1944 - Wilhelmshaven (5.35) // 23 October 1944 - Essen (5.55) // 30 November 1944 - Duisburg (5.55) // 21 December 1944 - Cologne (6.31) // 28 December 1944 - Opladen (6.25) // 30 December 1944 - Cologne (6.34) // 2 January 1945 - Nuremburg (9.00) // 5 January 1945 - Hanover (5.49) // 6 January 1945 Hanau (7.52) // 7 January 1945 - Munich (8.55) // 14 January 1945 - Merseburg (8.38) // 1 February 1945 - Mannheim (7.45) // 2 February 1945 - Weisbaden (6.30) // 4 February 1945 - Bonn (6.14) // 7 February 1945 - Goch (6.14) // 13 February 1945 - Dresden (10.25) // 16 February 1945 - Chemnitz (8.45) // 20 February 1945 - Dortmund (6.36) // 27 February 1945 - Pforzheim (8.29) // 7 March 1945 - Dessau (9.36) // Throughout his tour, Flight Sergeant Jowett (Air Gunner) has shown himself to be a fearless and highly skilled member of his crew. He has at all times displayed a splendid offensive spirit and a great coolness in the face of enemy fire. On a trip to Pforzheim his aircraft was attacked eight times by Ju.88s, but every attack was successfully beaten off by the exemplary teamwork and efficiency of the gunners. On another occasion, despite the fact that only one of his guns was serviceable and his sights had been blown away, he scored a damaged on a Ju.88. // For coolness and daring under the most difficult circumstances and for great skill as a gunner, I strongly recommend the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal to this NCO. // RCAF Press Release No.8893 dated 23 February 1945 from Sergeant J. Badger, transcribed by Huguette Mondor Oates, reads: // WITH THE RCAF BOMBER GROUP IN BRITAIN: -- The last trip on the tour of Flight Sergeant Morris Jowett, Eaton Rapids, Mich., (612 State Street), was one he will remember for some time to come. He shot down an enemy jet-propelled plane from the turret of a Lancaster bomber. // The encounter took place when returning from a raid on a synthetic oil refinery near Leipzig. The skipper, F/O Andrew Huchala, Blairmore, Alberta, saw “a light ahead and to one side moving at terrific speed”. He pointed it out to the rear gunner and to his mid-upper mate, F/S George Beck, 34 Beaconsfield Avenue, Toronto, Ontario. Several times the jet-propelled enemy plane attacked, and the pilot tried desperately to evade the faster and lighter aircraft taking advantage of the knowledge that the jet-job was not easily manoeuvered. // After several attempts to turn the Lancaster into suitable position for firing, Huchala wheeled the bomber into a very tight turn toward the enemy so sharp it almost flipped on its back. Just as the Lancaster turned into the other plane, Jowett let the Nazi have 200 to 250 rounds. The Hun shot past, dived through the thin clouds and crashed into the hills below exploding with a blinding flash. The “kill” was confirmed officially, and Jowett and the rest of his crew have finished their tour safely.
MacLEAN, Ralph Spencer Flight Lieutenant, No.405 Squadron, J17712 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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MacLEAN, F/L Ralph Spencer (J17712) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 10 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, 24 December 1919; home in Summerside, Prince Edward Island; became a licensed plumber and electrician. Enlisted in Charlottetown, 19 October 1940 as Aero Engine Mechanic. To Technical Training School, 6 December 1940. Promoted AC1, 26 April 1942. To No.4 SFTS, 30 April 1941. Promoted LAC, 26 July 1941. To ?Y? Depot, 17 January 1942. To RAF overseas, 9 February 1942. Promoted Corporal, 1 August 1942. Commissioned 1943. Overseas he took a course on Merlin engines, then became a flight engineer, remustering as of 23 September 1942 (promoted Sergeant that date). Commissioned 5 May 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 12 August 1943. Flew two tours, ultimately completing 55 sorties. Repatriated 15 June 1944. To Flight Engineer School, 8 August 1944 as instructor. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 24 August 1944. To No.1 Release Centre, 11 April 1945. Retired 24 April 1945. Award presented 5 July 1945. He joined Empire Brass Manufacturing as a pricer and was selected for sales management training. Transferred in March 1946 to Vancouver with responsibilities for that city and the interior of British Columbia. Became branch manager in Sudbury (September 1949) and then Winnipeg (June 1953). Promoted vice-president of marketing and eastern manager, June 1961 which took him to Toronto. To London in September 1969 as vice-president, Supply Division, EMCO. Retired in December 1984. He had taken out a private pilot?s license in 1975 and spent much time flying a Cessna 180. Died in Toronto, 22 September 2004. No citation other than \"completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.\" Public Records Office Air 2/9153 has recommendation dated 23 November 1943 when he had flown 44 sorties (386 hours 42 minutes). 16 November 1942 - Anti-sub patrol (6.30) 20 November 1942 - do. (12.00) 23 November 1942 - do. (11.00) 26 November 1942 - do. (11.45) 29 November 1942 - do. (11.45) 6 December 1942 - do. (9.45) 9 December 1942 - do. (9.10) 13 December 1942 - Convoy escort (7.44) 17 December 1942 - Anti-sub patrol (7.45) 20 December 1942 - do. (10.10) 24 December 1942 - do. (9.00) 14 January 1943 - do. (9.10) 19 January 1943 - do. (3.20) 26 January 1943 - Bordeaux (3.15) 3 February 1943 - Anti-sub patrol (9.45) 8 February 1943 - do. (9.45) 17 February 1943 - do. (9.20) 21 February 1943 - do. (11.30) 24 February 1943 - do. (10.25) 27 February 1943 - do. (10.30) 11 March 1943 - Stuttgart (8.10) 12 March 1943 - Essen (4.30) 22 March 1943 - St.Nazaire (6.14) 26 March 1943 - Duisburg (4.55) 27 March 1943 - Berlin (7.57) 29 March 1943 - Berlin (4.20) 3 April 1943 - Essen (4.25) 4 April 1943 - Kiel (5.36) 30 April 1943 - Essen (5.13) 4 May 1943 - Dortmund (3.18) 12 May 1943 - Duisburg (4.15) 13 May 1943 - Bochum (5.10) 25 May 1943 - Dusseldorf (4.05) 21 June 1943 - Krefeld (3.45) 28 June 1943 - Cologne (4.33) 13 July 1943 - Aachen (5.04) 15 July 1943 - Montbeliard (7.15) 9 August 1943 - Mannheim (5.33) 10 August 1943 - Nuremburg (7.19) 12 August 1943 - Turin (7.46) 16 August 1943 - Turin (8.00) 17 August 1943 - Peenemunde (7.36) 23 August 1943 - Berlin (6.46) 31 August 1943 - Berlin (6.49) 3 September 1943 - Berlin (7.43) 5 September 1943 - Mannheim (5.44) 6 September 1943 - Munich (7.14) 22 September 1943 - Hanover (5.05) 27 September 1943 - Hanover (4.16) 2 October 1943 - Munich (7.23) 3 October 1943 - Kassel (5.10) 7 October 1943 - Stuttgart (5.50) 9 October 1943 - Hanover (4.34) 18 October 1943 - Hanover (4.45) 17 November 1943 - Mannheim (4.47) Flight Lieutenant MacLean has completed 44 operational sorties against most of the enemy\'s most heavily defended targets. On all occasions he has displayed skill and determination of the highest order. His exceptional keenness and devotion to duty have been an inspiration to the squadron and he has carried out the duties of Squadron Flight Engineer Leader with marked success. Flight Lieutenant MacLean is strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.
PORTER, Spencer Maxwell Flight Sergeant, War Staff College (now AFCS, Washington), R105189 British Empire Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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PORTER, FS Spencer Maxwell (R105189) - British Empire Medal - War Staff College (now AFCS, Washington) - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born December 1920. Enlisted in Toronto, 22 May 1941 as Clerk/Stenographer and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. Promoted AC1, 22 August 1941. Promoted LAC, 22 November 1941. Appointed Corporal (unpaid), 29 December 1941. Promoted Corporal (paid), 1 August 1942. Promoted Sergeant, 1 January 1943. To No.1 Training Command, 30 April 1943. To No.1 ITS, 16 August 1943. To War Staff College, 2 September 1943. To Canadian Joint Staff, Washington, 1 August 1945. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 1 September 1945. Reverted to Corporal in postwar RCAF, 1 October 1946 (22700). To Station London, 25 September 1950. Still in RCAF as of August 1951. Award presented 9 January 1948. This non-commissioned officer has been employed as Administration Clerk at the Royal Canadian Air Force War Staff College since its inception over two years ago. To him fell the responsibility of organising the Orderly Room and solving many problems for which there was no precedent in the Service. Flight Sergeant Porter, with initiative, forethought and a cheerful willingness, created an administrative organization which has greatly contributed to the successful operation of the College. He has discharged his duties in a superior manner. His example and leadership are an inspiration.
RAILTON, Charles Spencer Flight Lieutenant, No.408 Squadron, J26609 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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RAILTON, F/L Charles Spencer (J26609) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 28 May 1917 in Vancouver; home there (office clerk and commercial traveller); enlisted there 26 May 1942. To No.3 Manning Depot, Edmonton, 16 June 1942. To No.3 WS, Winnipeg, 2 August 1942; promoted LAC, 3 September 1942; graduated 6 February 1943; posted next day to No.3 BGS, Macdonald; graduated and commissioned 14 May 1943. To “Y” Depot, 29 May 1942; to RAF overseas, 15 June 1943, embarking from Canada 16 June 1943. Disembarked in Britain, 24 June 1943. At the time he was boarding the ship for overseas, he tripped and fell, sustaining a broken leg and apparently back injuries. He was admitted to hospital on arrival in Britain and not discharged until 19 November 1943; had been promoted Flying Officer, 14 November 1943. To No.1666 CU, 9 December 1943 (not clear why this was delayed). To No.425 Squadron, 5 January 1944. To No.408 Squadron, 2 August 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 4 August 1944. To No.22 OTU, 18 February 1945. Repatriated 13 June 145; released 6 September 1945. Award presented in Vancouver, 22 October 1949. Died in Penticton, British Columbia, 18 January 1987 as per Airforce Magazine of July-August-September 1987 and in British Columbia Vital Statistics. RCAF photo PL-40042 (ex UK-16347 dated 11 November 1944) is captioned, “After an encounter with a Ju.88 over Germany, F/L Chuck Railton, Vancouver, gunnery leader of the Goose Squadron of RCAF Bomber Group in Britain, examines a model of the German fighter.” RCAF photo PL-40043 (ex UK-16348 dated 11 November 1944) is captioned as follows: “Ready to start out for a briefing, P/O F.J. Ward (left), Toronto, rear gunner and F/L Chuck Railton, Vancouver, gunnery leader of the Goose Squadron of the RCAF Bomber Group in Britain pause for a picture.” No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation of W/C J.F. Easton dated 5 November 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (143 hours 25 minutes), 24 February to 15 October 1944. Squadron Gunnery Leader. // A skilful air gunner who has at all times displayed outstanding devotion to duty. Flight Lieutenant Railton has participated in attacks on such major targets as Berlin, Schweinfurt, Stuttgart, Essen and Dusseldorf. In all these sorties, his coolness and fine offensive spirit have been an inspiration to the other members of his crew. // Flight Lieutenant Railton's alertness in spotting enemy fighters, and his prompt directions for evasive action have more than once saved his aircraft from destruction. // This officer's outstanding leadership marked him for appointment as Gunnery Leader of the squadron. During the period he has held this position, his efforts in the interest of training and operational flying have been tireless. // I consider that his splendid record of achievement fully merits the award of the Non-Immediate Distinguished Flying Cross. // The sortie list was as follows: // 22 February 1944 - Schweinfurt (8.15) // 1 March 1944 - Stuttgart (7.15) // 22 March 1944 - Frankfurt (6.15) // 24 March 1944 - Berlin (7.05) // 26 March 1944 - Essen (5.00) // 30 March 1944 - Nuremburg (1.15, duty not carried out) // 9 April 1944 - Villeneuve St. George (3.30) // 10 April 1944 - Ghent (4.10) // 18 April 1944 - Noisy-le-Sec (5.05) // 20 April 1944 - Lens (4.20) // 22 April 1944 - Dusseldorf (5.00) // 7 May 1944 - St. Valery (3.30) // 8 May 1944 - Haine St. Pierre (4.30) // 9 May 1944 - Calais (3.30) // 19 May 1944 - Merville (4.15) // 5 June 1944 - Houlgate (4.50) // 6 June 1944 - Coutances (4.35) // 8 June 1944 - Mayenne (4.50) // 14 June 1944 - St. Pol (3.45) // RAILTON, F/L Charles Spencer, DFC (J26609) - Mention in Despatches - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Unit identified in AFRO only as "Overseas"; proper unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Box 2067). Another source has given unit as No.432 Squadron. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) gives unit as No.408 Squadron and has recommendation submitted 3 February 1945, when he had served 13 months in Canada, 19 months overseas. Squadron Gunnery Leader. // A skilful air gunner who has at all times displayed outstanding devotion to duty, Flight Lieutenant Railton has been over many heavily defended targets deep in the heart of enemy territory such as Berlin, Schweinfurt, Essen, Dusseldorf and Stuttgart. On all these sorties his coolness and fine offensive spirit have been an inspiration to all members of his crew. His promptness in spotting enemy aircraft and his alertness have been responsible on many occasions for saving the aircraft from destruction. As Gunnery Leader of the squadron he has been an inspiration to one and all and he has been exceptionally competent. // NOTE: An example of the Air Gunner’s work is a combat report for Halifax “T”, serial NP756, 15 October 1944; action at 2016 hours, height 4,000 feet. The Mid-Upper guuner was Flight Sergeant A.A. Bulbeck (later awarded DFC). Railton fired 400 rounds (600 yards to 500 yards) and Bulbeck fired 200 rounds (575 yards to 500 yards). Narrative as follows: // The Rear Gunner first saw a red light which appeared to be following slightly down dead astern at approx. 1,000 yards for a few minutes; this light appeared to go out as a green light appeared. This light moved to the starboard quarter up and a 45 degrees being silhouetted against the light part of the sky. The Rear Gunner identified the light as being on the nose of a Ju.88 at 600 yards. The enemy aircraft appeared to be positioning itself for an attack. The Rear Gunner gave the order “Corscrew Starboard Go” and immediately opened fire. A second later the Mid-Upper Gunner joined fire. This enemy aircraft did not appear to press home his attack - the nose light went out and the enemy aircraft was last seen disappearing down on the port quarter. Because of the range of the attack no damage could be assessed. // Training: He specifically volunteered for air gunner. No record of his training at No.3 Wireless School (appears to have failed Morse), but at No.3 BGS he flew 24 hours 30 minutes in Battle aircraft (15 hours 30 minutes in turrer) and placed first in a class of 63. On the ground he spent three hours 30 minutes in turret manipulation, harmonization etc. Turrets were Bristol (air), Bristol, Boulton Paul and Fraser Nash on ground. At Stage I, ground courses in Armament, oral (80/100), Armament, written (257/300), Anti-Gas (85/100), Aircraft recognition (98/100), Navigation (92/100), Mathematics (50/50), Law, Administration and Hygiene (95/100), Signals (85/100). At Stage II he was further tested in Gunnery, written (135/150), Gunnery, practical and oral (85/100), Aircraft recognition (89/100), and Signals (75/100). Fired 200 rounds by day and 244 by night on skeet range, 700 rounds by day on 25-yard range, 1,000 rounds by day and 200 rounds by night on 200-yard range, 400 rounds air-to-ground and 3,650 rounds air-to-air (7.6 percent hits).
SHIACH, James Spence Flight Lieutenant, No.58 Squadron, J14126 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SHIACH, F/L James Spence (J14126) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.58 Squadron - Award effective 23 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 12 January 1918 in Winnipeg; home there. Former Sea Cadet and member of Royal Canadian Corps of Signals. Enlisted in Winnipeg, 21 June 1921. Granted Leave Without Pay until 1 October when posted to No.3 Manning Depot; to No.15 SFTS (guard duty), 25 October 1941. To No.2 ITS, 6 December 1941; promoted LAC, 31 January 1942 but not posted to No.2 EFTS until 28 February 1942; to No.11 SFTS, 23 May 1942. Graduated and commissioned , 11 September 1942; posted that date to No.1 GRS; to “Y” Depot, 2 January 1943; to No.31 Personnel Depot, 17 January 1943; to No.111 OTU, Nassau, 19 January 1943; promoted Flying Officer, 11 March 1943; to Ferry Command, 7 May 1943; to United Kingdom, 23 June 1943. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 11 September 1943. Repatriated 2 August 1945; retired 21 September 1945. Worked for Swift Canadian, retiring as Controller in June 1980. Died in Winnipeg, 16 August 2015. Photo PL-35208 shows him. PL-43930 dated 6 May 1945 has following caption: “Perched high on the nose of a Halifax bomber, these Canadian pilots are top scorers in RAF Coastal Command attacks on enemy shipping in the Skaggerak. Among them, the trio already have rolled up 22 attacks. From left to right they are: Flight Lieutenants Frank Rush, DFC, Spiritwood, Saskatchewan, eight attacks; W. Earl Umpherson, Perth, Ontario, seven attacks, and J. Spence Shiach, DFC, seven attacks”. Photo PL-43941 dated 6 May 1945 has the following caption: “These Canadian pilots fly with the night-prowling Halifax bombers of Coastal Command which are driving away enemy shipping from the sea lanes to Norway. From left to right they are F/L J. Spence Shiach, DFC, Winnipeg, F/O C.A. McLennan, Birtle, Manitoba, F/L W. Earl Umpherson, Perth, Ontario, F/O Gordon Ormston, (pointing), Unionville, Ontario, F/O K.J. Thompson,, Vancouver, F/O L.G. Thacker, Saint John, New Brunswick, and Warrant Officer (1) Alan Dallas, Winnipeg.” // This officer has completed very many sorties and throughout has set a fine example of keenness and skill. In October 1944, as pilot of aircraft, he executed a most determined attack on two merchantmen. In spite of accurate and concentrated anti-aircraft fire from two escorting vessels, Flight Lieutenant Shiach pressed home his attack and obtained hits on one of the merchantmen and one of the escorting vessels, which caught fire. This officer displayed courage and resolution worthy of high praise. // Excerpts from Coastal Command Operational Summaries (DHH 181/003 folio D.886): // Halifax K/58 - F/O Shiach - 0305, 23rd July 1944 - 46.52 N 02.37 W, Ile de Re - Aircraft on A/U patrol obtained a radar contact and attacked the estimated position of shipping through cloud, dropping six 500-lb M.C. bombs, spaced 60 feet from 4,000 feet. No results seen. // Halifax C/58 - F/O Shiach - 2042, 12th October 1944 - 57.55 N 10.02 E, Skagerrak. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol sighted one medium size merchant vessel, brilliantly let, and attacked from 2,000 feet with one 500-lb M.C. bomb which slightly overshot ship’s length away on the starboard quarter. After the attack, the lights went out, but no further result observed. // Halifax P/58 - F/L Shiach - 0040, 23rd October 1944 - 58.34 N 01.09 E, Skagerrak. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol sighted two M/Vs of 8,000 tons each and two escort vessels and attacked from 5,500 feet with six 500–lb M.C. bombs, 75 feet spacing. Two direct hits on one M/V and one on an escort vessel were observed, both vessels catching fire. When aircraft left both vessels were still burning. Two red distress signals were fired from the vessels after the attack. Fires were still visible when aircraft was 20 miles away. // Halifax C/58 - F/O Shiach - 2120, 12th October 1944 - 58.12 N 10.55 E, Skagerrak. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol following the attack above, obtained a radar contact on five vessels, homed and sighted a large merchant vessel believed 6,000 tons. Aircraft attacked from 6,000 feet with four 500-lb M.C. bombs, spaced 50 feet and sighted through a break in the cloud. Explosions seen through cloud, but no results visible. // Halifax F/58 - Captain F/L Shiach - 0507, 6th December 1944 - 58.12 N 11.02 E, northeast of Skaw. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol sighted two merchant vessels and four unidentified vessels (course unknown) and attacked dropping six 500-lb M.C. bombs, air burst pistol from 7,000 feet. Results were not observed. // Halifax H/58 - Captain F/L Shiach - 1845, 25th January 1945 - Rorvik Harbour. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol attacked two M/Vs in harbour dropping six 500-lb M.C. bombs tail fuses, from 6,000 feet. Only two bomb flashes seen, both on shore, one to the east of the harbour and the second on the east jetty where one of the targets was berthed. Debris came up and Halifax F/58 reported smoke from this position. Meagre shore flak before the attack. // Halifax C/58 - Captain F/L Shiach - 0533, 4th February 1945 - 58.39 N 10.40 E., north of the Skaw. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol obtained radar contacts and attacked dropping six 500-lb M.C. bombs, .025 seconds, tail delay, spaced 80 feet from 6,000 feet. Results were not observed. Target was later identified as six merchant vessels (500/2,000 tons) course 335 degrees. // Halifax F/58 - Captain F/L Shiach - 2217, 13th February 1945 - 58.30 N 9.10 E, northeast of Arendal. Aircraft on anti-shipping patrol obtained radar contact 17 miles distant, homed and sighted four destroyers in line ahead, course 270 degrees, speed 20 knots. Aircraft attacked from 6,000 feet with six 500-lb M.C. bombs, nose plugged, .0125 seconds tail delay, but it is estimated that bombs fell astern of the second destroyer in line and no results were observed.
SPENCER, Maurice John Flying Officer, No.424 Squadron, RAF 124645 Distinguished Flying Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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SPENCER, F/O Maurice John (RAF 124645) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1944. Born 1911 at Belfast; home in Wallasey, Cheshire. Enlisted 1941; trained in South Africa; commissioned 1942. No citation other than "completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."
SPENCE, Alexander Lett Flying Officer, No.434 Squadron, J85771 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, F/O Alexander Lett (J85771) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 29 December 1914 in Renfrew, Ontario; home in Flower Station, Ontario or Windsor, Ontario (office clerk, 1937-1939m salesman, 1940-1942 and “song writer”, 1939-1940); enlisted in Hamilton, 16 March 1942 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot, Toronto. To No.1 Training Command Headquarters, 23 May 1942. To No.5 ITS, Belleville, 21 June 1942; graduated and promoted LAC, 15 August 1942 but not posted to No.7 EFTS, Windsor until 26 September 1942; may have graduated 20 November 1942 but not posted to No.1 SFTS until 5 December 1942. Graduated and promoted Sergeant, 30 April 1943. To “Y” Depot, 15 May 1943. To RAF overseas, 26 May 1943; disembarked in Britain, 4 June 1943. To No.14 (Pilots) AFU, 13 July 1943. Attached Dallachy, 22 July to 26 August 1943. To No.23 OTU, 28 September 1943. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 30 October 1943. To No.61 Base, 18 January 1944. Attached to No.1664 Conversion Unit, 2 February to 3 March 1944. To No.434 Squadron, 3 March 1944. Commissioned 2 April 1944. Promoted Acting Flying Officer, 26 June 1944; confirmed in that rank, 25 September 1944 on posting to No.64 Base where he served as Air/Sea Rescue Instructor; assessment dated 25 May 1945 stated, “This officer has performed his duties as Air Sea Rescue Officer in a capable manner, and has taken a leading part in station musical activities.” (S/L H.N. Bell),. Attached to RCAF Overseas Headquarters, 1 May 1945. To Canada, 8 July 1945. To St. Hubert, 21 August 1945. To Release Centre, 4 September 1945; retired 21 September 1945. Moved to California after the war to work in the aircraft industry and be a part-time entertainer along Route 66. Died in San Jose, California, 1May 1965. Body returned to Canada and buried in Clyde Forks, Cemetery, Lanark County. Ontario. Award presented 14 September 1949. Incident described was raid on Aulnoye, 25/26 March 1944. // Flying Officer Spence has completed a tour of operational duty during which he has attacked many heavily defended targets. On one occasion during an attack on Aulnoye two engines of his aircraft were severely damaged and the flight engineer seriously injured. Despite these harassing circumstances this officer pressed on and successfully completed his mission. He has at all times displayed courage, devotion to duty and a fine fighting spirit. // DHH file 181.009 D.1941 (Library and Archives Canada RG.24 Volume 20612) has recommendation drafted 13 May 1945 when he had flown 36 sorties (173 hours 30 minutes) as follows: // 6 March 1944 - Trappes (5.15) // 7 March 1944 - Le Mans (40 minutes, duty not carried out) // 16 March 1944 - Amiens 5.25) // 22 March 1944 - Kiel (5.40) // 23 March 1944 - Laon (5.00) // 25 March 1944 - Aulnoye (5.10, engaged by enemy guns) // 30 March 1944 - Vaires (4.30) // 1 April 1944 - Terschilling (3.25) // 9 April 1944 - Lille (5.15) // 12 April 1944 - Heligoland (5.10) // 18 April 1944 - Kiel (7.10) // 20 April 1944 - Lens (5.00) // 7 May 1944 - Frisian Islands (3.15) // 24 May 1944 - Trouville (4.20) // 27 May 1944 - Le Clipon (3.40) // 5 June 1944 - Merville (4.50) // 6 June 1944 - Conde sur Noireau (5.50) // 15 June 1944 - Boulogne (4.05) // 16 June 1944 - Sterkrade (4.55) // 21 June 1944 - Oisemont Neuville (4.40) // 9 July 1944 - Mont Candon (4.05) // 12 July 1944 - Bremont (4.50) // 18 July 1944 - Caen (5.05) // 18 July 1944 - Vaires (4.50) // 28 July 1944 - Hamburg (5.50) // 3 August 1944 - Foret de Nieppe (3.45) // 5 August 1944 - St. Leu d’Esserent (5.10) // 8 August 1944 - Foret de Chantilly (5.00) // 9 August 1944 - Le Brequet (4.25) // 12 August 1944 - La Neuville (4.20) // 14 August 1944 - Falaise (4.30) // 15 August 1944 - Soesterburg (3.50) // 16 August 1944 - Kiel (4.55) // 18 August 1944 - Bremen (5.15) // 25 August 1944 - Brest (4.20) // 10 September 1944 - Le Havre (4.45) // 12 September 1944 - Dortmund (5.20) // Flying Officer Spence has completed a tour of operations totalling 36 sorties, many of which were against heavily defended targets. On one occasion during an attack on Aulnoye, his aircraft was heavily engaged by anti-aircraft fire resulting in two engines being severely damaged and the Engineer being seriously wounded. Despite these harassing circumstances, Flying Officer Spence continued on and successfully completed the mission. He has at all times displayed courage, devotion to duty and a fine offensive spirit throughout his tour. I strongly recommend the Non-Immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // DHist file 181.009 D.1634 (RG.24 Volume 20604) also has recommendation for a Croix de Guerre drafted by E.N. Mitchell, 11 January 1945 as follows: // This officer has flown 22 operations against the enemy during the occupation of France from D Day to the liberation of Paris. In order to press home his attacks successfully due to intense flak and on one occasion persistent fighter opposition he displayed great presence of mind and gallantry with total disregard for his own personal safety. I recommend the award of the Croix de Guerre. // Notes: On 8 October 1942 in solo practice sequence at No.7 EFTS, Tiger Moth 8971, levelled off too high, dropped the aircraft from 30 feet - error in judgement (inexperience) // Accident, 23 May 1944, Halifax LW174 on acceptance test. Minor damage. Failure of conspant speed unit on port inner. // Application for Operational Wing dated 25 September 1944 states he had flown 36 sorties (114 points), 6 March to 12 September 1944 (185 hours 15 minutes). // Training: Course at No.14 AFU was 13 July too 28 September 1943, Oxford aircraft (3.50 day dual to first day solo, 30.35 day dual, 27.55 day solo, 1.25 night dual to first night solo, 6.45 night dual total, 11.15 night solo - of these times, 6.00 in formation, 9.10 on instruments). Also logged 14 hours in Link.. Flying tests in General Flying (220/400), Applied Flying (105/200), Instrument Flying (145/250), Night Flying (65/100), Link (31/50). “With a little more application on his part, this pilot could have attained a higher standard of flying. His attitude has been casual both in the air and on the ground, and his flying has suffered in consequence. It is average generally but his night flying is very good.” (G/C A.H. Peck, 26 September 1943). // Course at No.23 OTU was 28 September to 27 December 1943. Flew Wellington III and Wellington X aircraft - 5.30 day dual to first day solo, 8.20 total day dual, 6.10 at controls with a captain, 30.45 at controls without a captain; 5.10 night dual to first night solo, 6.55 total night dual, 4.45 at night with a captain, 31.45 at night as sole captain - 27.50 on instruments - also 15.00 in Link. Did five day cross-country and five night cross-country exercises, one Nickel rail, one Bullseye, three daylight and one night fighter affiliation, dropped 32 bombs by day and 38 by night. “An ex-AFU pilot, Sergeant Spence has bad no trouble with his training at OTU. His nickel operation was successful even though he was holed by flak over enemy territory. At OTU he has conducted himself well and is recommended for four engined bombers.” W/C T.L. Bingham-Hall, 27 December 1943. // Course at No.1664 Conversion Unit was 3 February to 2 March 1944. Crew was R158750 FS A.L. Spence (captain, later DFC), J24657 F/O E.D. Wickens (navigator, later DFC), R162125 Sergeant E.H. Ranson (bomb aimer, later DFC), R129616 Flight Sergeant W.J Kelly (WOP), 1814773 Sergeant A.F. Ellingworth (flight engineer), R218578 Sergeant J.W. Fisher (mid-upper gunner) and R111210 Sergeant A.D. Malcolmson (rear gunner). Overall assessed as “Average crew. Bomb Aimer needs pushing to get any results from him.” Assessment for Spence was “Average pilot. A keen and reliable captain who should do well on operations.” Flying course was as follows: // 1. Familiarization (30 minutes, day) // 2. Dual, circuits and bumps (2.10, day) // 3. Dual, circuits and bumps, overshoots (3.00, day) // 4. Three-engine flying before solo (30 minutes, day dual) // 5. Solo, circuits and bumps (1.45) // 6. Dual check, including overshoot (40 minutes) // 7. Solo, circuits and bumps, three-engine flying (1.30) // 8. Solo, circuits and bumps, general flying, BA practice (1.30) // 9. Dual, three-engine landings and overshoots, two-engine flying (1.30) // 10. Solo, complete crew; air-to-sea, bombing, W/T practice, GEE and map reading (2.00) // 11. Solo, complete crew; air-to-air, 16,000 foot climb, general flying (2.15) // 12. Dual, complete crew; fighter affiliation, air-to-sea, SBA (1.10) // 13. Solo, complete crew; fighter affiliation (1.00) // 14. Solo, complete crew, air-to-air, bombing (2.15) // 15. Dual, night circuits and bumps (2.15) // 16. Solo, night circuits and bumps (1.30) // 17. Solo, full crew, day cross country (4.15) // 18. Solo, full crew, night cross country, night bombing (time ?) // 19. Solo, full crew, night cross country (time).
SPENCE, Charles Edmond Flight Sergeant, No.5 Squadron (Canada), R54754 Mention in Despatches and Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, FS Charles Edmond (R54754, later J27366) - Mention in Despatches - No.5 Squadron (Canada) - Awarded 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born Krinklin, Ireland, 9 March 1917. Home in Verdun, Quebec. Enlisted in Montreal, 29 May 1940. To No.1 ITS, 1 June 1940; graduated and promoted LAC, 24 June 1940 when posted to No.4 EFTS; to No.2 SFTS, 31 August 1940. Ceased training and posted to No.1 Manning Depot, 21 November 1940. To No.1 WS, 3 February 1941; graduated 20 July 1941 and posted next day to No.1 BGS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 18 August 1941. To Halifax, 19 August 1941. To No.31 OTU, 31 August 1941. To Eastern Air Command, 13 December 1941. To No.5 (BR) Squadron, 22 December 1941. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 18 February 1942. Promoted WO2, 1 November 1942.No citation. Commissioned 19 May 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 19 November 1943. To Eastern Air Command Headquarters, 30 September 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 October 1944. To No.2 Release Centre, 26 August 1945. Retired 30 August 1945. Living in Ottawa in 1950. Died in Ottawa, August 2009. WOPAG in unit; no citation. // SPENCE, WO2 (later P/O) Charles Edmond (R54574/J27366) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.5 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 5 October 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Award presented in Montreal, 21 November 1947. See DFC entry for S/L B.H. Moffit for details of attack on U-630, sunk 4 May 1943. // Since being Mentioned in Despatches in the New Years Honours List 1943, this NCO has continued his valuable and conscientious work as a Wireless Air Gunner. He was the First Wireless Air Gunner aboard an aircraft when enemy submarine sightings were made, one of which was attacked and destroyed. The proper functioning and operation of the equipment for which he was responsible contributed greatly to the discovering of the submarine within the vicinity of the attack.
SPENCE, Howard Clements Wing Commander, RCAF Overseas Headquarters, C1822 Member, Order of the British Empire RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, W/C Howard Clements (C1822) - Member, Order of the British Empire - RCAF Overseas Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 28 March 1940 in Administration Branch. At Trenton as of 15 August 1941 with rank of Squadron Leader. To No.1 Training Command, 24 May 1942. Promoted Wing Commander, 1 May 1943. To “Y” Depot, 24 October 1943. Taken on strength of No.3 PRC, 31 October 1943. To RCAF Overseas Headquarters, 25 November 1943. Repatriated 18 November 1945. To No.5 Release Centre, 22 November 1945. Retired 18 December 1945. Award presented 17 January 1948. Living in Winnipeg in 1950. Died in Montreal, 23 December 1964. // This officer, employed in the Establishments and Organization Branch of this Headquarters, has displayed diligence, perseverance and initiative of a very high order. Never sparing himself, he has searched for ways to improve his usefulness to the Service and has made a notable contribution to the war effort. He can be relied upon to achieve outstanding success in all duties with which he is assigned.
SPENCE, John Alexander Flight Lieutenant, No.277 Squadron, J3995 Distinguished Flying Cross - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, F/L John Alexander (J3995) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.277 Squadron - Award effective 23 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born Fergus, Ontario, 27 April 1919; home in Guelph; enlisted in Hamilton, 2 July 1940 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.1 ITS, 22 July 1940; graduated and promoted LAC, 6 October 1940); posted next day to No.3 EFTS; graduated 25 November 1940 when posted to No.6 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 10 February 1941. Commissioned 11 February 1941. To No.1 Manning Depot, 15 February 1941. To Debert, 27 February 1941. Embarked from Canada, 7 March 1941. Taken on strength of No.2 PRC, 19 March 1941. To No.59 OTU, 22 March 1941. To No.43 Squadron, 5 May 1941. To Station Manston, 27 May 1941. To Station Hawkinge, date uncertain. Attached to No.765 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm, 17-27 July 1941 for Walrus course (land and water landings). Attached to Station Pembroke, 27 July to 2 August 1941 for course in rough sea flying. Promoted Flying Officer, 11 February 1942. To No.277 Squadron, 3 March 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 28 July 1942. Attended a Chemical Warfare Course at the Experimental Station, Porton, 18 July to 21 August 1943. To Overseas Repatriation Depot, 23 September 1943. Arrived in Canada, 28 September 1943. To Station Suffield, 27 November 1943. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 March 1944. To War Staff College, Toronto, 1 December 1944. To Suffield again, 10 December 1944. Remained there to 5 August 1946. Retired 7 August 1946. Re-engaged with Primary Reserve 25 February 1952 until 15 May 1957 but relinquished commission when business commitments proved too distracting. DFC presented at uncertain date, possibly with the Bar which was awarded on 27 April 1945. Died 9 January 1991 as per Airforce Magazine of October-November-December 1991. Biography published in High Flight, Vol.2, No.1 (magazine defunct). RCAF photo PL-2425 (early 1941) shows J.A. Spence (Guelph), Horton K. Shendon (Michigan) and R. Ferrier (Toronto). RCAF photo PL-19321 (ex UK-4510 dated 15 July 1943) shows P/O John Van Rassel of Timmins (left) and Flight Lieutenant John A. Spence ((Guelph) taken outside Buckingham Palace following investiture. // This officer has flown on a number of rescue sorties over the Straits of Dover and the Channel and has been instrumental in rescuing seven survivors from crashed planes. In December 1942, he was attacked by a Focke Wulfe 190, but although his aircraft was damaged he successfully evaded the attacker and landed safely at base. On another occasion he persevered with the search despite heavy fire from the German ground defences. In February 1943 he flew to within five miles of Le Treport, brought his aircraft down on to the sea and rescued a Canadian pilot who had been shot down three hours previously. The visibility was deteriorating fast but he succeeded in a rescue which typified the skill, courage and resourcefulness invariably exhibited by this officer. // NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/4951 has recommendation. // Since joining the Air/Sea Rescue Service on 3 June 1941, this officer has carried out 73 rescue sorties over the Straits of Dover and Channel, flying Lysanders and Defiants, and has been instrumental in rescuing seven survivors from crashed planes. On 11 December 1942 when flying a Defiant of Dungeness he was attacked by a Fock Wulfe 190. In spite of the fact that his aircraft was damaged, he was successful in evading the attack and landing safely at base. On another occasion he persevered with a search one mile north of Calais in spite of fire from the German ground defences until he was recalled. On 28 February 1943 Flight Lieutenant Spence made his first operational sortie in a Walrus, having completed his training on this type of aircraft only two days before. This sortie took him to within five miles of Le Treport, where he landed and picked up a Canadian Flight Sergeant Pilot who had been shot down three hours before. He then took off and returned safely to base. The visibility was deteriorating fast, and this rescue is typical of the skill, courage and resourcefulness that this officer has so frequently exhibited. During the last seven months Flight Lieutenant Spence has commanded the detached flight of No.277 Squadron at Hawkinge with distinction, and has set a fine example to his pilots and air gunners. // SPENCE, F/L John Alexander (J3995) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.277 Squadron - Award effective 9 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. // In June 1943, this officer undertook a flight to search for a pilot who was adrift in his dinghy in the English Channel. He succeeded in locating the dinghy some two and a half miles from the French coast. The sea was exceedingly rough, but he brought his aircraft down safely on to the water, then taxied to the airman, who after a strenuous effort, was hauled aboard. Owing to the heavy seas it was not possible for the aircraft to take off again so, disregarding enemy minefields in the vicinity and the possibility of attack from the air, Flight Lieutenant Spence resourcefully taxied his aircraft across the Channel to a home base. His gallant achievement was worthy of high praise. // Operational Wing: // His application for an Operational Wing dated 2 February 1944 noted, “OC 277 Squadron stated I had to take a rest. RCAF signaled an officer required for Chemical Warfare Establishment in Canada, was selected and posted to Porton and Boscombe Down, England for five week course, repatriated to Canada and given command of present unit, RCAF Detachment, Suffield.” He then listed the following: // 24 May 1941 - No.43 Squadron, Hurricane - Defence - 1.15 // 17 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 18 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.10 // 22 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.20 // 23 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.20 // 25 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.30 // 26 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.35 // 30 June 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 2.10 // 2 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 4 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.50 // 5 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 5 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 7 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.00 // 7 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - ten minutes // 7 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.25 // 8 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.55 // 8 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.20 // 10 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 10 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.00 // 11 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.30 // 12 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.40 // 14 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.15 // 14 July 1941 - ASR Flight, RAF Hawkinge - Lysander - Rescue - 1.00 // 14 March 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue (1.10) // 24 March 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 25 minutes // 25 March 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 55 minutes // 1 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.45 // 5 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.25 // 7 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.35 // 13 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.40 // 18 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.50 // 25 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.10 // 26 April 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 50 minutes // 5 May 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 35 minutes // 7 May 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.00 // 9 May 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.10 // 19 May 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.00 // 26 May 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.05 // 1 June 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.30 // 20 June 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.45 // 24 June 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.35 // 27 June 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 45 minutes // 4 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 55 minutes // 8 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.00 // 9 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.00 // 13 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.10 // 14 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 35 minutes // 21 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.35 // 22 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 15 minutes // 29 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.45 // 29 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 55 minutes // 30 July 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.55 // 6 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.30 // 8 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.05 // 12 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 45 minutes // 13 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.25 // 13 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.30 // 15 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 35 minutes // 19 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.55 // 25 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.40 // 28 August 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 40 minutes // 2 September 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 2.00 // 8 September 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.45 // 16 September 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.15 // 21 September 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.00 // 26 September 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.30 // 5 October 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 35 minutes // 14 October 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Defiant - rescue - 1.20 // 31 October 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 30 minutes // 2 November 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 50 minutes // 9 November 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.00 // 29 November 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 15 minutes // 29 November 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 50 minutes // 29 November 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 55 minutes // 1 December 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.10 // 8 December 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.40 // 11 December 1942 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 40 minutes // 22 January 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.05 // 22 January 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 2.35 // 28 February 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 1.30 // 9 March 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.30 // 11 March 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.30 // 25 March 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 20 minutes // 29 March 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 1.25 // 11 April 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 50 minutes // 14 April 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 40 minutes // 14 April 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.00 // 16 April 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 1.20 // 17 April 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.50 // 4 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 1.00 // 6 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 15 minutes // 12 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 15 minutes // 13 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 1.10 // 13 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 20 minutes // 13 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 2.15 // 15 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 25 minutes // 17 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Lysander - rescue - 1.15 // 18 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 20 minutes // 19 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 30 minutes // 31 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 45 minutes // 31 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 1.15 // 1 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 20 minutes // 1 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 3.00 // 4 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 25 minutes // 12 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 1.20 // 13 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 1.00 // 14 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 50 minutes // 14 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 50 minutes // 16 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 2.20 // 21 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 15 minutes // 22 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 15 minutes // 25 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 2.05 // 28 June 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 1.25 // 2 July 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 45 minutes // 8 July 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 45 minutes // 15 July 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 20 minutes // 15 July 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Spitfire - rescue - 1.10 // 15 July 1943 - No.277 Squadron - Walrus - rescue - 40 minutes // Notes: As of 25 June 1952 he stated he had flown 618 hours 15 minutes single-engine in daylight, 549.20 multi-engine in daylight, 11.15 single engine at night and 9.15 multi-engine at night (total of 1,188 hours five minutes). Of this, 32.10 on instruments. Also had 38 hours of civilian flying (all single-engine day). // In May 1943 authorities were looking for a replacement for S/L Ken Birchall at Suffield. It was suggested that somebody from the Army Cooperation units overseas should be returned to Canad. The candidates for the post were to be good pilots, prepared to “be called upon to fly various types of strange machines”, practical, a good organizer and with some technical education. Various officer names were entertained but some were not available. In the end, Spence was chosen. // Selected Assessments: // “Extremely keen, conscientious and thorough. His flight has shown excellent results, chiefly through his leadership and example.” (S/L A.S. Linney, No.277 Squadron, 17 September 1942) // “This officer in his capacity as Flight Commander has displayed outstanding qualities as a leader, and the high rate of efficiency that exists in the flight is due to his untiring efforts. An above average officer whom I consider suitable in all respects for promotion.” (S/L L.J. Brown, No.277 Squadron, 16 July 1943, noting that he had flown 505 hours, 119.35 in past six months. // “This officer’s work is proving entirely satisfactory and he takes a keen interest in it.” (G/C G.A. Sellars, 14 July 1944). // “A very satisfactory Commanding Officer of the Detachment at Suffield. Good cooperation with the civil staff and with the army.” (A/V/M G.R. Howsam, 15 November 1944). // Suffield Crash: // The crash of Norseman 2466 is fascinating, not for the crash itself but for the duties it was conducting. It happened at 1920 hours, 23 May 1946. S/L J.A. Spence wrote: // At 1800 hours I received notice from the Chief Experimental Officer of Experimental Station Suffield to carry out experiment 3007. Immediately I signed out and proceeded to the Norseman where F/L Faurot was in the second pilot’s position and WO1 Owen was in the rear as hopper operator in charge of toxic load. I checked the load which consisted of 1,000 pounds of toxic mixture. I strapped myself in, turned the gas on “both”, checked that float indicators were not visible on gas tank indicators, carried out normal start and run up, and found the aircraft serviceable. // He then describes take off and flight at 500 ft to “lay out area.” // On arriving at the area to be sprayed 16 miles east of aerodrome I circled the field at 200 feet above ground until approximately 1850 hours when we received the go ahead signal and the trial was completed by approximately 1915 hours according to the program, having disposed of approximately 800 pounds of bait (trial at 50 feet above ground). On receiving the return to base signal I climbed at same engine settings to 500 feet and headed back to station. // Crew were Spence, F/L V.J.J. Faurot, DFC (second pilot) and WO1 F.K. Owen (crew). Described once as “spraying” but the stuff was in 50 pound bags suggesting powder or dust. Returning to base engine began cutting and Spence took over. Unable to restart engine. Unable to find cause and tried a force landing. // The aircraft was landed under difficulty conditions 7 miles east of aerodrome on rough, rolling terrain and into a low sun. The aircraft bounced on the wheels from a hummock and on striking another hummock 90 yards further on the port oleo was fractured. ... The aircraft touched down again just before crossing a shallow rutted prairie road... The aircraft was airborne again over a slight dip in the ground and when the port wheel made contact again the ruts dug by the left oleo became increasingly deeper. This braking action caused the tail to rise as shown by two propeller marks ending in a hole caused by the engine nosing in. The starboard wing made contact before the aircraft had completely turned over and the engine was torn away to the left of the direction of travel. // Port fuel tank full, starboard empty. Had pilot incorrectly set switches ? Possible groundcrew negligence in not topping off tank after an earlier flight. Spence had 1,052 hours all types, one hour dual and 36 hours solo on Norse - 5.40 in previous six months. // Excerpts from No.277 Squadron Operational Record Book: // 4 May 1943 - No.277 Squadron carried out searches for W/C Blatchford from 0605 on, 30 miles out to sea. Weather too rough (wind) for Walrus and Lysander so estuary patrols in Spitfires by F/L Spence and Sgt Gooch. // Squadron operating from Martlesham, Shoreham, Hawkinge, Gravesend. As of 5 May Hawkinge has three Spitfires, three Lysaders, one Walrus. Shoreham 3 Defiants, 2 Walrus, 4 Spitfires, // Hawkinge, 12 May 1943 “During the morning F/L Spence with two Lt.Commanders set off in the Walrus to search the Rye area for mines; they were accompanied by FS Standen in a Spitfire but they were recalled for a Top Line. The Top Line was a false alarm as Group only wanted the Walrus to stand by.” // 13 May 1943 - “At 1015 hours P/O Hartwell accompanied by F/L Spence took off in a Walrus to carry out the Estuary Patrol, landing at 1115.. . . At 1715 hours F/L Spence with FS Glew and FS Butler took off in a Walrus in search 177 degrees 22 miles from Dungeness but were recalled owing to the presence of enemy aircraft. They took off again at 1750 hours returning at 2005 with nothing to report.” // 17 May 1943 - “F/L Spence with FS Butler carried out the Estuary Patrol in a Lysander accompanied by Sgt Kipping in a Spitfire, there was nothing to report.” // 19 May 1943 - described as a Flight Commander (others F/L Bron - Brown ? And Dekyvere). // 23 May 1943 - DFCs for F/L Brown and P/O Sheppard. // 28 May 1943 - good story. Hawkinge - “A practice rescue was carried out in the Estuary. A dinghy was dropped by Sergeant Moir from a Lysander and P/O Hartwell and W/O Waddington in a Walrus found the dinghy and landed beside it. W/O Waddington instead of hauling the dinghy into the back hatch decided to clamber into it and go for a sail whereupon P/O Hartwell left him to his fate and took off without him (They are the best of friends). The incident became very amusing when WO Waddington, getting very wet was waving to the Walrus, was seen by a Naval launch which proceeded to the spot to effect a rescue, but much to their disgust our friend refused to be rescued by anything else but the Walrus, which by this time had decided that WO Waddington had had enough, landed and hauled him aboard. When the heat of his language had dried him again they took off and returned to base. (We must add that these two are still the best of friends).” // 1 June 1943 - Hawkinge - “F/L Spence took off in Walrus to do the Estuary patrol and whilst on it was told to join with another section of Spitfires which were on the MID CHANNEL patrol at North Foreland and proceed on vector 080 degrees 15-30 miles and search area, which they did but nothing to report. F/L Spence landed at Manston at 1010 hours, short of fuel, while the Spitfires returned to base.” // 3 June 1943 - story re S/L Grace. // 9 June 1943 - Spence to Canadian HQ for an interview. // 12 June 1943 - He did a Mid-Channel and Estuary patrol with Sgt Gooch. // 13 June 1943 - 100th rescue. // 16 June 1943 - Hawkinge “The Flight was called to Top Line at 0500 hours as a pilot had gone in during the night. Sgt Rollo in a Spitfire, escorted by two other Spitfire of 91 Squadron went to search 120 degrees 17 miles from base. All were airborne at 0520 hours. On reaching the position the pilot was located in his dinghy after 20 minutes search, the position being 20 miles 115 degrees. The Walrus had been called to readiness and was airborne at 0630 hours with F/L Spence and Sgt Humphries. They proceeded to the position and were told to fly two miles south and at the same time they saw the 3 Spitfires orbiting the pilot (Sgt Ticklepenny of No.3 Squadron). F/L Spence dropped a smoke float and went in to land, the time being about 0630 hours. The sea was very rough but no damage was caused to the aircraft. Six attempts were made to get the man aboard, and he fell out of his dinghy twice, this being due to the very heavy seas. The gunner was sent to the back of the Walrus, which was taxied on to the pilot. F/L Spence left the controls and grabbed for him out of the starboard window but missed. Sgt Humphries managed to seize the airman by his wrists and with the help of F/L Spence dragged the survivor into the aircraft. F/L Spence then went back to the controls, and as the sea was too rough for take-off started to taxi back. All hatches were closed to prevent the aircraft being swamped due to the sea washing over the aircraft. The R/T was rendered unserviceable. F/L Spence taxied for 15 minutes and again made two attempts to get off the water, but was unsuccessful. Sergeant Humphreys brought the rescued pilot forward, wrapped him in blankets, gave him water and a cigarette. The Walrus was met half way back by two HSLs from Dover. Due to the cross sea, great difficulty was experienced in keeping the aircraft on a straight course for Dover. In the meantime, 20 FW.190s were sent out to sink the Walrus but 91 Squadron attacked them, shooting down four and the Walrus was not molested. Sgt Seydell of 91 Squadron was shot down, but was taken aboard an HSL. Sgt Mitchell was also shot down and went straight in. At about 0800 hours the Walrus taxied into Dover Harbour, where the navy took the rescued pilot off, smashing both wing tips off the Walrus in the process. The Walrus was eventually anchored to a buoy and F/L Spence and Sgt Humphreys boarded the WASP for breakfast. The Walrus crew did not know of the fight which occurred on the way back, and thanks are due to 91 Squadron for their safe return. FS Standen later collected the Walrus from Dover and flew it to Gravesend.” // 17 June 1943 – “F/L Francis of the RCAF Public Relations Office came down to F/L Spence and 91 Squadron.” // 22 June 1943 – Hawkinge - “There was however a slight panic at 1200 hours when the Walrus was put on immediate top-line for a Fortress crew which was reported down 3 miles N.W. Calais. Cover reported the sea too heavy for the Walrus to operate and this was verified by F/L Spence who flew 10 miles out to sea to check up. Owing to this the Walrus was washed out and later it was reported that the plot was not definite and it was called a complete washout.” But later in the day a full rescue and two Walrus aircraft taxiing from near the Dutch coast. // 24 June 1943 – “Just at dusk F/L Spence and FS Standen took off in the two Walruses for formation and evasive action, landing at 2235 hours.” // 25 June 1943 – Hawkinge – Spence flew an Estuary patrol. // 28 June 1943 – Spence on Estuary patrol, 0840-1005. // 12 July 1943 – Word received of Bar to DFC for Spence. // 17 July 1943 – Spence on mid-Channel patrol. // 18 July 1943 – to Boscombe Dow for a gas course. “F/L Spence has been at Hawkinge ASR Flight for 2 years and 1 month, except for a break of 9 months when he was detached owing to sickness.”
SPENCE, Percy Edwin Pilot Officer, No.78 Squadron, J16535 Distinguished Flying Cross and Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, P/O Percy Edwin (J16535) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.78 Squadron - Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943 and AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943. Born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, 15 April 1919; home there; enlisted in Halifax, 14 February 1941 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.1 BGS (guard), 24 March 1941. To No.1 ITS, 16 May 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 21 June 1941 when posted to No.7 EFTS; graduated 8 August 1941 when posted to No.16 SFTS; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 7 November 1941. To “Y” Depot, 8 November 1941. To RAF overseas, 8 December 1941. Promoted Flight Sergesnt, 7 May 1942. Commissioned 1 December 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 1 June 1943. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 18 November 1943. Appears to be instructing at No.1664 Heavy Conversion Unit in July 1944 (see record for J.E. Moffatt). Repatriated 13 June 1945. Retired 9 September 1945. Re-engaged as pilot, 15 September 1951 (47026). Served with No.19 Technical Unit. Award presented by King George VI, 7 December 1943. Died in 2005, possibly in Penticton. Photo PL-21660 is a portrait. // This officer has participated in many successful sorties against the most heavily defended targets, including two against Berlin. His courage, determination and initiative have contributed largely to the high standard of efficiency maintained by his crew. // NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/8950 had recommendation dated 7 March 1943; credited with 29 sorties (212 hours 15 minutes). First three operations as 2nd pilot; all others as captain. Sorties and original text as listed as follows (although text mentions a raid on Frankfurt which is not recorded in the sortie sheet): // 31 July 1942 - Dusseldorf (5.05) - Large fires seen in target area. // 6 September 1942 - Duisburg (5.20) - Bomb bursts seen in built-up area. // 10 September 1942 - Dusseldorf (5.07) - Fires seen in built up area. Goon box failed on outward journey and wireless telephone failed on return. // 1 October 1942 - Flensburg (7.07) - Fires seen. // 5 October 1942 - Aachen (6.09) - Number of fires in built-up area. // 6 October 1942 - Osnabruck (5.50) - Bomb bursts in target area. // 8 October 1942 - GARDENING (3.56) // 13 October 1942 - Kiel (7.07) - Good fires in target area. // 15 October 1942 - Cologne (6.22) - Many fires seen. // 23 October 1942 - Genoa (9.34) - Bomb bursts in railway sidings. // 15 November 1942 - Genoa (10.27) - Bombs seen to explode on target. // 18 November 1942 - Turin (8.50) - Bombs dropped on town. Returned safely on three engines. // 22 November 1942 - Stuttgart (9.17) - No results observed. // 28 November 1942 - Turin (9.30) - Very large fires seen in town. // 6 December 1942 - Mannheim (8.43) - Glow of fires seen through clouds. // 9 December 1942 - Turin (9.37) - Large fires observed. // 20 December 1942 - Duisburg (5.48) - Widespread fires observed. // 14 January 1943 - Lorient (5.02) - Bomb on target area. // 17 January 1943 - Berlin (8.32) - Many fires seen. // 2 February 1943 - Cologne (5.46) - Many large fires counted. // 3 February 1943 - Hamburg (7.44) - Glow of fires seen through clouds. // 7 February 1943 - Lorient (6.05) - Ten large fires counted. // 25 February 1943 - Nuremburg (9.36) - Many fires observed taking hold. // 26 February 1943 - Cologne (6.21) - Many fires counted. // 28 February 1943 - St.Nazaire (7.21) - Target well alight. // 1 March 1943 - Berlin (7.46) - Numerous scattered fires seen. // 3 March 1943 - Hamburg (6.07) - - // 5 March 1943 - Essen (5.36) - Heavy concentrated raid. // 8 March 1943 - Nuremburg (8.50) - Target attacked. // This officer has now completed 29 sorties. He has bee engaged in attacking some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, including two sorties to Berlin. He has held his crew together well, which accounts for their high standard of efficiency. On a fairly recent attack on Frankfurt it is believed that his was the only crew to obtain a photograph of the aiming point. // The Officer Commanding, RAF Station Linton-on-Ouse, added his remarks on 12 March 1943: // A first class captain of aircraft who has shown the greatest determination, courage and enthusiasm at all times. He has always shown the keenness desire to proceed on operations and his sterling qualities have been a source of inspiration to his squadron. He is a Canadian. // On 30 March 1943 the Air Officer Commanding, No.4 Group, added: // This officer has now been posted for instructional duties ad I very strongly recommend that he be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. // SPENCE, F/L Percy Edwin, DFC (J16535) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. No citation in AFRO.
SPENCE, Robert Leslie Flight Sergeant, No.40 Squadron, R78542 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCE, FS Robert Leslie (R78542, later J17284) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.40 Squadron - Award effective 25 February 1943 as per London Gazette dated 26 February 1942 and AFRO 513/43 dated 26 March 1943. Born 11 October 1918 in Chatham, Ontario. Educated at McKeough Public School (Chatham, Ontario, 1924-1928), Secondary School No.16, Howard Township, Kent Country (1928-1932) and Ridgetown High School and Agricultural School (1932-1937). Home in Highgate, Ontario (far, hand, 1937-1939; Woolworth store stockman, April to November 1939; farm hand thereafter); enlisted in London, Ontario, 8 October 1940. To Rockcliffe, 25 October 1940. To No.1 ITS, 3 January 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 8 February 1941 but not posted to No.10 EFTS until 21 February 1941; graduated 22 April 1942 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot; to No.8 SFTS, 2 May 1941; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 27 July 1941. To Embarkation Depot, 28 July 1941; embarked from Canada, 24 August 1941. Taken on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 2 September 1941. To No.22 OTU, 16 September 1941. To No.15 OTU (Harwell), 16 February 1942. To Overseas Air Delivery Unit, 23 February 1942. Taken on strength of RAF Middle East, 26 February 1942. To Wastage Pool, Middle East, 28 February 1942. To No205 Group, No.238 Wing, 8 March 1942. To No.40 Squadron, 10 May 1942. Missing 8 October 1942, then reported safe, 4 November 1942. Commissioned 15 January 1943. To No.22 Personnel Transit Center, 28 February 1943. To United Kingdom, 13 March 1943, embarking at Takoradi on 21 March 1943 and disembarking in England, 9 April 1943. To RCAF Overseas Headquarters, 24 April 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 15 July 1943. Repatriated via Rockcliffe, 14 May 1943. To AFHQ, 25 May 1943 for intense propaganda tour. To No.36 OTU, Greenwood, 5 September 1943. To AFHQ for special duties, 8 October 1943. To No.6 SFTS, Dunnville, 14 November 1943 (refresher course). To No.3 Training Command, Montreal, 16 February 1944. To No.3 Aircrew Graduate Training School, Three Rivers, 18 June 1944. To Mountain View, 3 July 1944. To Pennfiekld Ridge, 28 July 1944. To No.165 (Transport) Squadron, 29 August 1944. To No.168 (Heavy Transport) Squadron, Rockcliffe, 6 January 1945. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 15 January 1945. To Pennfield Ridge, 15 April 1945. To Station Moncton, for service with No.164 (Transport) Squadron, 18 June 1945. Unit predesignated No.426 Squadron, 1 August 1946. To Western Air Command, 9 December 1946. Retired 6 January 1947. Award presented by King George VI, 11 May 1943. Died in Vancouver, 20 April 1995 as reported in Legion Magazine of August 1995. See photo PL-15872 (ex UK-4021 dated14 May 1943 - following investiture with FS John B. Wood (RAAF) and Mrs. N.I. Butterliss of London, England, their guest of the day and mother of their gunner who was wounded and taken prisoner; PL-15873 (ex-UK-4022 dated 14 May 1943, same group and occasion, Spence left, Wood right; PL-15868 (ex UK-4016 dated 14 May 1945), same group and occasion, Spence left, Wood right . The following photographs were taken on his return to Canada with John Wood: PL-17031 on left, with FS John Woods (Australian) visiting war factories in Canada; PL-17393 same pair, Irvin Air Chute Factory, Fort Erie; PL-17395 same pair again; PL-17400, ditto (Wood on left); PL-17403, Spence (left) and Wood (right) at Niagra Falls; PL-17428 Spence left, Wood right in a shoe factory. PL-20170 with Wood in Canada; PL-20172, Spence, Mary Stevens, FS Woods. This airman has completed numerous missions, many of them as captain of aircraft. In October 1942, during an attack on Tobruk, his aircraft was badly damaged by anti-aircraft fire and he and his crew were forced to abandon it near El-Aden. Flight Sergeant Spence with two of his comrades set out on a long trek to our lines at El Alamein. One of the party was compelled to drop behind but for twenty-eight days Flight Sergeant Spence and his companion continued the journey. They successfully evaded enemy columns and camps and were eventually saved by a British patrol. Since reaching safety, Flight Sergeant Spence has participated in four attacks on Tunis and Sousse. This airman has displayed great courage, fortitude and devotion to duty. The following is an extract from an official RAAF history, Air War Against Germany and Italy, 1939-1943 by John Herington (Canberra, Australian War Memorial), p.361. A photograph in the book also identifies Sergeant J.K. Wood and Warrant Officer R.S. Spence who had “walked 350 miles in about three weeks to Allied lines via the Qattara Depression”. After noting that the regularity of Wellington raids and the high standard of serviceability (contrasting significantly with enemy efforts), it listed several RAAF members of No.40 Squadron, and went on to state: Unshakable faith in themselves and the purpose of their fighting gave a mental stimulus which led them at times to attempt the almost impossible. Thus, on 8th October when a Wellington of No.40 Squadron caught fire while circling Tobruk and had to be abandoned near Capuzzo, the four survivors from the crew were not downcast. They were then more than 300 miles from the British front positions even in a straight line long which lay the whole enemy army. To the south lay desert where evasion was ;possible but chances of survival slim. The only supplies which they could muster between them were three filled water bottles, six tins of bully beef, a few biscuits, milk tablets, chocolate, toffee and chewing gum, Benzedrine, matches and four small compasses. Only one of these men, Sergeant [J.K]. Wood, was an Australian, but his mental and physical toughness were of great importance in this adventure. At dawn the men began to walk eastwards until 4 p.m., stopping only at a cairn filled with rainwater, from which they drank and filled an abandoned two=gallon tin which they found nearby. On the fourth day they crossed the frontier into Egypt but two of the party were already weak and footsore and suffering badly from the heat. On the sixth day while they were still within easy reach of the railway, one man decided he could go no farther and headed northwards towards the coast. Two days later, when south of Sidi Barrani, the second man was also forced to abandon the attempt to escape. Wood and his pilot now had left only four tins of meat, three of chocolate, a few biscuits and milk tablets and two gallons of water. This they arranged to last for twelve days, and confident of their own endurance they headed south-eastward into the desert. Heat and sandstorms gave them little rest but they pushed on each night, their shoes falling apart and finally held together with wire. By the eighteen day, “sleep was almost impossible, partly because of exhaustion and mostly because of the continual gnawing in our stomachs and the thoughts of food and cool drinks that we could not keep out of our minds.” Despite the frugal and determined rationing., their food and nearly all their water had been consumed by the twentieth day, but they now fell in with several parties of Bedouin camel drivers from whom they secured a few dates and rice. They had no knowledge of the fierce battle then raging at El Alamein, but on the 2nd November (the twenty-fourth day) when near El Maghra, they heard a motor lorry in the distance. Heading northwards they met elements of a British armoured unit which arranged for them to be sent to their squadron. A more detailed account was written by Ron Dodds, “The Long Walk Home: The Story of a Canadian Pilot’s 400-Mile Desert Trek”, Legionary, August 1966. See Sweeping The Skies:A History of No.40 Squadron, RFC and RAF, 1916-56 by David Gunby (Bishop Auckland:The Pentland Press,1995). The appendix identifies the aircraft as Wellington DV504 “G” , identifies the cause of loss as “engine failure” . The book and casualty signals identify the crew as Flight Sergeant R.I. Spence (RCAF, evaded), 1269807 Sergeant K. Bowhill (Dagenham, Kent, POW), R75616 Sergeant C.C. Hill, RCAF (POW, home in Kitchener), Aus 403540 Sergeant J.K. Wood (RAAF from Hornsby, New South Wales, evaded), 749479 Sergeant E.A. Linforth (Coventry, POW) and 1272144 Sergeant A.W. Butteriss (London, POW). On pages 215-216 the following narrative describes the evasion: All six crew escaped from the aircraft safely, but the observer and second pilot were quickly captured. The other four - Spence, the wireless operator (Sergeant J.K. Wood, RAAF) and the gunners (Sergeants A.W. Butteriss and E.A. Linforth) - set out for the British lines, some 300 miles to the east. They had between them four sall compasses, three full water bottles, sixteen packets of hard biscuits, six tins of bully beef, some chewing gum, chocolate, toffee and milk tablets. On the first two days they were fortunate to find supplies of water and a two-gallon can in which they could carry additional water. On the sixth day Sergeant Butteriss, who had exacerbated an ankle injury on landing, could go no further. Aware that this might happen, they had travelled close to the coast, and they were able to leave him sufficient food and water to get himself to the coast road, captivity and medical help. The other three headed eastwards, and by the eighth night were south of Sidi Barrani. But Linforth, who had also injured his ankle on landing, could go no further, and he too was left with sufficient food and drink to reach the coast and safety. Spence and Wood now had between them four tins of bully beef, three tins of chocolate, sixteen biscuits and some milk tablets along with three full water bottles and about a gallon and a half of water in the can. They had been eight days on the march, and estimated that another twelve should bring them to safety. In fact it was not until the 24th day that they encountered a British patrol north of El Maghra, and though they rationed their food strictly, and received generous assistance from groups of Bedouins whom they encountered, they ran out of food on the nineteenth night. Only two further encounters with Bedouins saved them. The book goes on to relate how the Commanding Officer, W/C R.E. Ridgeway, recalled events: The Army gave them a meal and drink, but they refused to wash, change or do anything till they had reached the Squadron. They were flown to the Squadron, where I had them placed into sick quarters, not because they were ill, but to give them the pleasure of a proper bed and bath. After a few days of “sick” treatment, I sent them on leave. They only wanted to go to Palestine, and as that was out of bounds, I gave them a “To whom it may concern” open letter, giving details of their epic walk, lent them my Squadron light communications aircraft, a Magister, and sent them to Palestine. Everywhere they landed they got the VIP treatment. An RCAF press release dated 22 May 1943 described his adventure as follows: After being given up for dead, and actually sleeping in a tomb. P/O Robert E. Spence, DFM of Highgate, Ontario is back in Canada with quite a reputation as a pedestrian. P/O Spence’s reputation began the night of October 8, 1942 when his Wellington bomber was shot up during a raid on Tobruk. The port engine was hit and it immediately packed up, hundreds of miles inside enemy territory. The Wimpy lost altitude rapidly, and it was decided to bale out. Four of the crew got together again on the ground, but the tail gunner had s shrapnel wound, and another member had a recurrence of an old ankle injury. On their suggestion they were left behind near railway trucks where they would be picked up and taken care of, while Spence and his Australian air gunner, Sergeant Johnny Wood, would try to walk back to the British lines. Wood now has come to Canada to train as a pilot. They had a few cans of bully beef, a can of tomato juice, emergency dinghy rrations and escape kits. The Horlick’s tablets proved to be their salvation. They kept up their strength and didn’t make them thirsty. The pair had to take plenty of detours to avoid enemy patrols and several times were chased by German aircraft. When they came across wrecked tanks they were able to collect precious salvage - water from radiators and canned food from the debris. Walking was very rough, and their service boots began to give them a lot of trouble, so they made rubber insoles, salvaged from a wrecked bomber, which proved a big help and enabled them to maintain a pretty fast pace. By day they suffered from extreme heat. At night the cold was bitter. Until they found two German blankets they had been using part of a parachute to wrap themselves in at night. Despite the fact that they were dead tired, they found it almost too cold to sleep. They got terribly thirsty at times, and one night when it poured rain they were able to collect water in the hollows of the lava rock. One day they stumbled across an Egyptian tomb and explored it in the hope of finding water. There was none. They cut weeds nearby, made mattresses and spent the night in the tomb. As they plodded through the Quattara Depression they were getting weary and almost exhausted, until they came across an Arab camp. They stayed with the Arabs for a few days to regain their strength and found the camel’s milk and the rice queer tasting stuff. Anxious to rejoin their squadron, the two airmen were soon on their way again. Their weight was dropping steadily as they struggled on, and the closing stages were cruel. It was a great moment in their lives when they sighted a British patrol some distance south of El Alamein. The pair, looking like a couple of scarecrows, were placed in a hospital for a few days, where they fully recovered and learned that they had been given up for dead. They went off to Palestine for a rest, and within two weeks had regained most of their lost weight. P/O Spence is happy to be back in England again, but would have liked to stay for the Tunisian campaign. Today it would take a lot of argument to entice him into anything which resembles a long stroll. Notes: Accident at No.22 OTU, 25 January 1942, Wellington Ic, serial R1773. “Pilot states that after four hours flying, port engine oil pressure dropped to zero pounds per square inch and temperature to 25 degrees C. The second pilot was sent immediately to pump oil from reserve tank into port engine, but engine stopped and aircrew and reduction gear fell off. Aircraft was force landed on runway at Hinton-in-the-Hedge with the undercarriage lowered by not locked.” The Technical Report read, “The reduction gear of the port engine flew off in the air owing to the oil tank having run dry. The excessive consumption which most certainly did occur was undoubtedly aggravated by the fact that although the flight lasted four hours, no fresh oil had been drawn from the overlocal [sic] tank.” General Remarks read, “Although this forced landing was primarily caused by a failure in crew drill and captaincy, the subsequent calm behavior of the two pilots and the captain’s good judgement led to a successful forced-landing in difficult circumstances. Every effort was made in the time available to lower and lock the undercarriage by the emergency system.” Application for Operational Wing dated 4 January 1944 listed the following sorties with No.40 Sqadron, all on Wellingtons - those from 25 December 1942 to 23 February 1943 were from Malta: 22 June 1942 - Temini (5.20) 24 June 1942 - Troop concentraion (6.25) 26 June 1942 - Sidi Barrani (6.20) 28 June 1942 - Sidi Barrani (4.55) 2 July 1942 - Sidi Barrani (4.00) 4 July 1942 - Sidi Barrani (5.35) 6 July 1942 - Tobruck (8.25) 11 July 1942 - Tobruck (8.40) 18 July 1942 - Tobruck (8.15) 20 July 1942 - Fuka (4.50) 23 July 1942 - Tobruck (6.55) 26 July 1942 - Army co-op (5.00) 29 July 1942 - Tobruck (8.15) 1 August 1942 - Tobruck (8.05) 4 August 1942 - Tobruck (7.20) 10 August 1942 - Tobruck (7.50) 24 August 1942 - Tobruck (8.23) 28 August 1942 - Battle Ground (4.50) 2 September 1942 - Battle Ground (4.30) 2 September 1942 - Battle Ground (2.35) 9 September 1942 - Tobruck (7.45) 15 September 1942 - Mersa Matruh (6.25) 20 September 1942 - Tobruck (8.35) 22 September 1942 - Tobruck (8.00) 27 September 1942 - Tobruck (8.30) 29 September 1942 - Solume (7.20) 8 October 1942 - Tobruck (6.00) 25 December 1942 - Suesse (3.50) 27 December 1942 - Tunis (4.20) 2 January 1943 - Suesse (4.45_ 5 January 1943 - Suesse (4.35) 8 January 1943 - Tripoli (4.00) 10 January 1943 - Tunis (4.35) 15 January 1943 - Tripoli (4.30 20 January 1943 - Palermo (7.25) 23 February 1943 - Gabes West (5.00) On 23 September 1943, while at No.36 OTU, he was reported having an anxiety state caused by a stressful overseas tour, insufficient rest and extended lecturing in Canada. This was further demonstrated by a letter dated 5 November 1943 (A.G.A. Spence, Ottawa Division, National War Finance Committee, to G/C D.E. McKell, Director of Personnel, AFHQ, expressing appreciation for his work with the Fifth Victory Loan campaign. It read in part, “I know that Bob has not been keen on public appearances but on the other hand he has at all times been extremely courteous in acceding to requests to speak at meetings. He has spoken at all hours of the day and night, from 7.30 a.m. one day until midnight another. He has at all times carried himself in such a manner as to be a very definite credit to the RCAF. We appreciate very greatly your courtesy in allowing him to help us, and hope that his experiences have not been too painful for him.”
SPENCER, Gordon Lewis Pilot Officer, No.405 Squadron, J16834 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCER, P/O Gordon Lewis (J16834) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Born 1 August 1922 (birth date on MI.9 report); home in Winnipeg or St. Vital, Manitoba (student); enlisted 5 February 1941 in Winnipeg and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.1 BGS, 24 March 1941; To No.1 ITS, 16 May 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 21 June 1941 when posted to No.7 EFTS; ceased training 17 July 1941 and posted to Trenton; to No.7 AOS, 31 August 1941; graduated 5 December 1941 when posted to No.3 BGS; graduated 17 January 1941, promoted Sergeant that date and posted to No.1 ANS. To “Y” Depot, 24 February 1942. To RAF overseas, 12 March 1942. Further trained at No.22 OTU (Wellesbourne). Commissioned 9 January 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 9 July 1943. Repatriated 9 September 1943. To “Y” Depot again, 25 November 1943. Taken on strength of RCAF Overseas Headquarters, 13 December 1943 and resumed operations. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 9 January 1945. Repatriated 14 May 1945. To No.2 Air Command, 27 May 1945, To No.1 Composite Training School, 2 January 1946. To Northwest Air Command, 15 February 1946. To Edmonton, 23 April 1947. Retired 14 May 1947. No citation in AFRO. Public Records Office Air 2/5025 has recommendation for a Military Cross (but War Office suggested no award). In same crew as S/L L.E. Logan, P/O H.J. Jennings, P/O R.C. Dennison, and Flight Sergeant E.L. Bulman. After escape he left Gibraltar on 9 August 1943, arriving in Prestwick 10 August 1943. Pilot Officer Spencer was the bomb aimer of a Halifax aircraft which attacked Stuttgart on the night of 11th March 1943. On the return flight the bomber was attacked by enemy fighters and set on fire, the crew being compelled to abandon it by parachute. Alighting in some woods, Pilot Officer Spencer proceeded to dispose of his parachute and life saving jacket and then walked to the edge of the wood where he observed an isolated farm house. While Pilot Officer Spencer was watching the farm house, an armed Frenchman appeared who, on learning Pilot Officer Spencer's identity, told him where he was (near Mondrepuis) and advised him to approach the farm house at dark. Pilot Officer Spencer hid in the woods until dark and then went to the farm house where he was given a meal and provided with refuge in a hay loft. Pilot Officer Spencer remained in hiding here until 16th March, when, after being given civilian clothing, he was taken to a nearby village from which point his subsequent journey was arranged for him. NOTE: Further to the above, Air 2/5025 has G/C J.E. Fauquier's recommendation for a non-immediate MC dated 21 October 1943 which also lists previous sorties; Spencer had flown 16 sorties (157 hours 19 minutes, although sortie list gives correct hours and 20 trips); on 27 November 1943 Air Commodore Bennett "Strongly Recommended" the award. Sorties and Fauquier recommendation as follows: ASP=Anti-Submarine Patrol 14 September 1942 - Wilhelmshaven (4.59) 16 September 1942 - Essen (5.46) 19 September 1942 - Saarbrucken (7.30) 23 September 1942 - Flensburg (6.10) 26 September 1942 - Flensburg (5.53) 2 October 1942 - Krefeld (5.40) 5 October 1942 - Aachen (6.24) 6 October 1942 - Osnabruck (5.55) 13 October 1942 - Kiel (6.08) 15 October 1942 - Cologne (6.14) 23 October 1942 - Genoa (10.08) 28 October 1942 - ASP (8.53) 2 November 1942 - ASP (9.22) 7 November 1942 - ASP (10.00) 10 November 1942 - ASP (9.25) 15 November 1942 - ASP (9.05) 20 November 1942 - ASP (8.53) 25 November 1942 - ASP (10.20) 28 November 1942 - ASP (9.40) 1 December 1942 - ASP (10.54) In an attack on Stuttgart on the night of 11th March 1943, the aircraft in which Pilot Officer Spencer was Bomb Aimer was shot down in flames by enemy night fighters. On the instructions of the captain the crew baled out. Pilot Officer Spencer was successful in eluding enemy patrols and returned to this country, despite numerous hardships which he encountered. In effecting his escape this officer displayed great courage and determination and is strongly recommended for the award of the Military Cross. FURTHER NOTE: Air 2/5025 contains long report prepared for MI.9 on his evasion up to linkup with Resistance. This is also found in WO 208/3314. It reads as follows (references to “S/P.G.” documents are other MI.9 reports): I was bomb aimer of the crew of the Halifax aircraft of which S/L Logan (S/P.G. 1174), Flight Sergeant Jennings (S/P.G. 1175), P/O Dennison (S/P.G. 1325) and Flight Sergeant Bulman (S/P.G. 1326) were members. We left Topcliffe at approximately 1930 hours on 11 March 1943 to bomb Stuttgart. On our return journey, about 2345 hours, we were attacked by a night fighter in the neighbourhood of Hirson (NW Europe 250,000, Sheet 5). Our aircraft was set on fire, and the captain ordered us to bale out. My helpers in France told me that Flight Sergeant Kennett, RCAF, or rear gunner, had been injured in the leg either during or after his landing, and had been betrayed to the Germans by the occupants of a house at which he had sought help. My helpers assured me that the traitors concerned would be suitably dealt with. I landed in a wood, uninjured, a few miles North-East of Mondrepuis, northwest of Hirson (Sheet 5). I remembered that one of the Intelligence lectures which I had received had warned me that it was dangerous to seek shelter in the woods, because of the likelihood of encountering German dumps or headquarters. I was therefore afraid to penetrate further into that in which I found myself. I cut up my parachute and hid it and my Mae West in a thicket. At the time I had no idea where I was. In a little while I noticed some dirty pieces of paper in a clearing and examined them. They bore writing in French, which I can understand, though I am not a fluent French speaker. From this fact I surmised that I must be in France. I now took off my badges which I carried in my pocket. I then crawled into the thicket under my parachute. I could see a glow in the sky from my burning aircraft and could also hear the ammunition exploding. I remained in the thicket till daybreak on 12 March 1943. I then recovered my parachute and Mae West and buried them. Before leaving England I had provided myself with a money belt containing a compass, needle and thread, anti-burn ointment, “Band-Aids”, razor, soap and toothbrush. With the aid of this compass I started walking south, and in a little while came to the edge of the wood. Here I opened my purse and removed the maps therefrom. I could see an isolated farmhouse. While watching it a man in uniform came up behind me. He was armed with a pistol. I was just about to make a dash into the wood when he came to attention and saluted me. He said, “Parachutiste ?” I said, “Yes”. He then said, “Anglais ?” and I said “Canadian”. He then shook me by the hand and explained that he was a Frenchman. With the aid of my map he indicated to e roughly where I was. He told me to wait until dark, and said that then I could with safety ask for help from the people in the farmhouse which I had been watching. He then left me. I went back into the wood and about noon opened my escape box, and ate some Horlick’s tablets and some condensed milk with the tube. I was wearing a pair of issue boots inside my flying boots. I now took off the flying boots and buried them. After dark I approached the farm. When the farmer heard that I was Canadian and saw my identity discs, he took me into his house and gave me a meal. He told me that it would not be safe for me to sleep in the house that night, but he allowed me to sleep in a hayloft. While here I was visited by another man who told me that two members of my crew were dead. He asked me how many there were in the crew, and their names, as he wished to look for possible survivors. At first I refused to give him their names, which disconcerted him somewhat. I remained in the hayloft until the night of 13 March, when my helpers gave me a complete outfit of civilian clothes and a pair of shoes. One of them said that Sergeants Lacina and McDonald of my crew had been killed and had been give a decent funeral at Mondrepuis. Here also I heard of Kennett’s capture. On the night of 15 March I was taken into the farmer’s house and allowed to sleep in a bed. The next day, 16 March, another helper took me by car to a nearby village, where I met P/O Dennison (S/P.G. 1325). From this point my subsequent journey was arranged for me.
SPENCER, Herbert Kennett Yuill Flight Lieutenant, No.404 Squadron, C11690 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCER, F/L Herbert Kennett Yuill (C11690) - Mention in Despatches - No.404 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as “Overseas”) - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 388/46 dated 12 April 1946. Born in Halifax, 14 June 1909. Clerical Accountant with CNR, 1927-1936 and agent for transport, Hudson bay Company until joining RCAF; enlisted in Edmonton, 15 May 1942 and immediately commissioned as an Administrative Officer. To No.1 Manning Depot, on enlistment. To Western Air Command Headquarters, 5 June 1942. To No.115 Squadron, Annette Island, 16 June 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 15 October 1942. To AFHQ, Ottawa, 29 January 1943 and sent overseas for an Intelligence Course, returning to Canada in late June 1943. To Western Air Command again, 10 July 1943. To No.115 Squadron, Annette Island, 19 July 1943, moving with that unit to Terrace, British Columbia, 16 November 1943. To Western Air Command Headquarters, 21 January 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 April 1944. To “Y” Depot, Lachine, 27 July 1944. Embarked from Halifax, 3 August 1944. Disembarked in Britain, 10 August 1944. To Headquarters, No.6 Group, 29 August 1944. To No.404 Squadron, 8 September 1944. To Station Banff, 25 May 1945. To No.18 Group Headquarters, 25 May 1945. To Station Bircham Newton, 25 June 1945. Repatriated 23 October 1945. Retired 4 December 1945. Death reported in Airforce Magazine, April-May-June 1985 issue, date not specified. Note: He kept a log of his flying which lasted from 15 June 1942 (Goose 941 with S/L Diamond, aircraft search, Cowichan Lake to Patricia Bay, 1.30) until 4 June 1944 (Ventura 2231, F/L McMaster, engine test and reconnaissance, Tofino-Alberni and return, 1.45. In between were many “reconnaissance” flights in Harvards, anti-submarine patrols in Sharks (18 December 1942 to 28 January 1943) and transportation flights in Venturas. “A very keen and capable intelligence officer. (S/L G.G. Diamond, No.115 Squadron, 10 December 1942). “Has carried out Station Intelligence Officer duties in an excellent manner. Completed Intelligence Course in United Kingdom.” (W/C A.H Cooking, Western Air Command Headquarters, 21 March 1944. “A keen, conscientious and hard working officer.” (W/C E.W. Pierce, No.404 Squadron, 28 October 1944). “One of the best Intelligence Officers I have known.” (S/L E. Nordberg, Station Dallachy, 29 December 1944.
SPENCER, John Lloyd Flight Lieutenant, No.1 Bombing and Gunnery School, C3026 Commended for Valuable Services in the Air RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCER, F/L John Lloyd (C3026) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.1 Bombing and Gunnery School - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. Born 8 July 1905 at Humberstone, Ontario (RCAF Press Release of 27 December 1943 announcing award).. Home in Port Colborne, Ontario; enlisted in Niagara Falls, 7 November 1940 as General List and commissioned that date as Flying Officer. At No.1 BGS as of 31 December 1941. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 April 1943. To No.1 Training Command Headquarters, 9 June 1944. Retired 28 July 1944. This officer as Officer Commanding a bombing flight has shown a high degree of devotion to duty. His excellent keenness and tireless energy have been a constant and splendid example to pilots and trainees alike.
SPENCER, Nelson Hughes Flight Lieutenant, No.418 Squadron, J10732 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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SPENCER, F/L Nelson Hughes (J10732) - Mention in Despatches - No.418 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Born 11 July 1916. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 9 May 1940. To No.1 ITS, 27 May 1940; graduated and promoted LAC, 19 July 1940 when posted to No.8 EFTS; may have graduated 15 September 1940 but not posted to No.4 SFTS until 12 October 1940; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 20 December 1940 when posted to Central Flying School; to No.4 BGS, 6 March 1941; to No.6 AOS, 13 April 1941; to No.1 ANS, 17 April 1941; to “Y” Depot, 24 November 1941; to RAF overseas, 8 December 1941. Commissioned 15 March 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 1 October 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 May 1943. Repatriated 3 September 1943. To No.36 OTU, 25 October 1943; to No.8 OTU, 30 June 1944. To No.8 Release Centre, 28 March 1945; retired 19 May 1945. Died in New Westminster, 8 February 1994.
SPENCE, Jeffrey Gordon, Master Corporal, SEE DESCRIPTION, SEE DESCRIPTION Meritorious Service Medal CF Postwar Aviation Services
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SPENCE, Jeffrey Gordon, Master Corporal, CD - Meritorious Service Medal - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 23 June 2010. From Wilmot, Nova Scotia.. Co-recipients were Master Corporal Joseph Arsenault, Major Jonathan Bouchard and Captain Jeffrey Middleton Powell. // On November 19, 2008, the aircrew of Rescue 903, a Cormorant Search and Rescue helicopter, rescued three stranded sailors from their rapidly sinking dredging barge off the coast of Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. The aircrew consisted of aircraft commander Captain Powell; first officer Major Bouchard; flight engineer Master Corporal Arsenault; and Master Corporal Spence, a search and rescue technician under training. Flying through hazardous, icy conditions, with winds of up to 40 knots and six-metre seas, the aircraft arrived on scene with minimal fuel to spare. Over the next hour, the crew proceeded to hoist the three sailors onboard the aircraft, one by one, as darkness approached. Shortly after the successful rescue, while the aircraft was proceeding to shore, the barge was reported sunk. Tremendous effort, focus on the mission and the utmost in aircrew coordination resulted in three lives being saved that day.
SPENCE
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DAVID JEROME FS(WAG) R188291. From Toronto, Ontario. Killed Nov 17/44 age 22. #24 Operational Training Unit (Cum Labore Adjuvantes). Wellington aircraft #LF 355 crashed and burned, immediately after take-off, at Abbey Farm, Broadway, Worcestershire, England. WO W.H. Cyples, FS R.L. Melville, and Sgt N.A. Stock were also killed. Flight Sergeant Wireless Operator Air Gunner Spence is buried in the Brookwood Military Cemetery, Woking, Surrey, England.
SPENCE
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DONALD WILLIAM F/O(N) J39399//R187765. From Windsor, Ontario. Killed in Action Feb 5/45 age 23. #419 Moose Squadron (Moosa Aswayita). F/O Spence was on his 18th operation when he lost his life during a trip to Bonn, Germany. Please see F/L D.J. Buchanan D.F.C. for casualty list and flight detail. Flying Officer Navigator Spence is buried in the War Cemetery, Hatton, Luxembourg, Belgium.
SPENCE
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DOUGLAS JAMES P/O(FE) C528641/A2086. From Vancouver, British Columbia. Killed Mar 27/45 age 33. #45 Delivery Group, Dorval, Quebec. Liberator Aircraft, enroute from the United Kingdom via the Azores, did not arrive in Ottawa, Ontario. F/L David Buchanan and twelve passengers were also killed. Pilot Officer Flight Engineer Spence has no known grave, his name is inscribed on the Ottawa War Memorial, Ottawa, Ontario.
SPENCE
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HAROLD OMOND FS(BA) R154088. From British Guiana. Killed Oct 20/43. #90 Squadron (Celer). Stirling aircraft #EF 497 struck a tree and crashed at the Woodhouse Farm, Warwickshire, England. FSs E.E. Spencer, K.W. Pollitt, and five RAF members of the crew were also killed. Flight Sergeant Bomb Aimer Spence is buried in the Botley Cemetery, North Hinksey, Berkshire, England.
SPENCE
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HERBERT ARTHUR F/O(P) C4505. From Winnipeg, Manitoba. Killed Sep 22/43 age 21. #163 Canadian Squadron. F/O Spence was killed when Harvard aircraft #2572 crashed during a bombing demonstration at Mott Lake, Alberta. Flying Officer Pilot Spence is buried in St. James's Cemetery at Winnipeg, Manitoba.
SPENCE
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MALCOLM BURGESS P/O(N) J17487. From Toronto, Ontario. Killed in Action Jun 22/43 age 24. #429 Bison Squadron (Fortunae Nihil). Wellington aircraft #HZ 517 was shot down near Venlo, Limburg, Holland during a night trip over enemy-held territory. P/O G.H. de Bussac, F/O W.A. Follows, WO D.E. Palmatier, and FS G.D. Coe were also killed. Pilot Officer Navigator Spence was buried in the Military Cemetery at Venlo, exhumed, and reburied in the Jonkerbos War Cemetery, Nijmegen, Holland.
SPENCE
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WINCELL HENRY DUGMORE P/O(P) J85302//R96214. From Ottawa, Ontario. Killed in Action Nov 28/42 age 21. #412 Falcon Squadron (Promtus Ad Vindictum). Spitfire aircraft did not return from a sweep near Bayeux, France, presumed enemy action. Pilot Officer Pilot Spence has no known grave, his name is inscribed on the Runnymede War Memorial, Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey, England.
SPENCER
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CHARLES COREY VAN DUSEN P/O(N) J18693. From Picton, Ontario. Killed in Action Jan 14/44 age 22. #408 Goose Squadron (For Freedom). Lancaster aircraft #DS 767 lost during a night attack on Brunswick, Germany. F/O S. Dawson, P/Os J.B. Cameron, J.A. Earle, L.L. Hansen, WO H. MacLennan, and Sgt B.G. Capel (RAF) were also killed. There were two #408 Sqdn. aircraft lost in the same area on this date. Please see F/O W.H. Timmins for information regarding the other aircraft and crew. Pilot Officer Navigator Spencer is buried in the Limmer British Cemetery at Hanover, Germany.
SPENCER
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ERVINE EUGENE FS(AG) R173981. From Hamilton, Ontario. Killed Oct 20/43 age 22. #490 Squadron (Celer). Stirling aircraft crashed. Please see Spence H.Q. for casualty list and flight detail. Flight Sergeant Air Gunner Spencer is buried in the Batley Cemetery, North Hinksey, Berkshire, England.
SPENCER
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FRANCIS ARTHUR FS(BA) R139365. From Douglastown, New Brunswick. Killed in Action Dec 29/43. #467 Australia Squadron. Lancaster aircraft #ED 547 crashed five miles south-east of the target Berlin, Germany during night operations. Six of the crew, not Canadians, missing believed killed. Flight Sergeant Bomb Aimer Spencer was buried in the English Section of the Parish Cemetery at Gross-Zieten, Germany, exhumed, and reburied in the Berlin War Cemetery, Charlottenburg, Germany.
SPENCER
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GEORGE DOUGLAS MELBOURNE P/O(BA) J37483//R3005. From Toronto, Ontario. Killed in Action Jan 15/45 age 30. #419 Moose Squadron (Moosa Aswayita). Target - Merseburg, Germany. The crew of Lancaster aircraft #KB 799 had completed the bomb run, were heading home and were near Schweinfurt, Germany when they were attacked from below by a German night fighter aircraft. The Lancaster burst into flames and the crew was ordered to bail out, only F/O J.Q. Eddy managed to get out and he was taken Prisoner of War. F/L G.O. Tedford, P/Os C.S. Thomson, H.M. Rumball, A.G. McKay, and Sgt R.J. Williams (RAF) were also killed. This was the 15th trip for this crew and there were two 419 Sqdn. aircraft lost this night. Pilot Officer Bomb Aimer Spencer is buried in the Limmer British Cemetery at Hanover, Germany.
SPENCER
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GEORGE RAYMOND F/O(N) J38724. From St. Catharines, Ontario. Killed Dec 23/44 age 29. #5 Operational Training Unit, Boundary Bay, British Columbia. The crew of Mitchell aircraft 4 HD 315 took off from Boundary Bay to swing the air compass. The aircraft crashed off the end of the runway and immediately burst into flames. F/O T.L. Walmsley was also killed and Cpl. R.E. Dutton subsequently died of injuries sustained. Flying Officer Navigator Spencer is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Thorold, Ontario.
SPENCER
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GORDON LEONARD SGT(AG) R270670. From Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan. Killed Oct 17/44 age 19. #1664 Heavy Conversion Unit. The crew of Halifax aircraft #LL 240 were engaged in a cross-country training flight when they crashed four miles north-west of RCAF Station, Dishforth, Yorkshire. F/Os J.F. Landsky, W.J. Lee, G.J. Strickland, Sgts E.J. Neuman, J.L. Powell, and one of the crew, not Canadian, were also killed. Sergeant Air Gunner Spencer is buried in the Stonefall Cemetery, Wetherby Road, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England.
SPENCER
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HARRY GRANT F/O(P) J9393. From Milverton, Ontario. Killed Jul 11/43 age 21. #267 Squadron. Dakota aircraft #FD 815 crashed north-west of El Acuita. F/O G.V. Gibson and four of the crew, not Canadians, were also killed. Flying Officer Pilot Spencer was buried in the Borgel Cemetery, exhumed, and reburied in the Medjez-El-Bab War Cemetery, Tunisia, Africa.
SPENCER
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HUGH PHAIR FS(AG) R100196. From Winnipeg, Manitoba. Killed in Action May 1/43 age 20. #451 Squadron (Swift And Sure). Halifax aircraft #HR 733 was shot down twenty-five miles northwest of Essen at Heiden, Germany. WO W.R. Hewitt was also killed. Five members of the crew, not Canadians, missing believed killed. Flight Sergeant Air Gunner Spencer was buried in the Old Cemetery at Heiden, exhumed, and reburied in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Kleve, Germany.