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TAYLOR, Kenneth Garth Squadron Leader, No.1 General Reconnaissance School, RAF 41331 Air Force Cross RAF WWII
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TAYLOR, S/L Kenneth Garth (RAF 41331) - Air Force Cross - No.1 General Reconnaissance School - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Born 18 June 1914 in Port Elgin, New Brunswick; home there. Educated at Port Elgin, 1920 to 1932, at Mount Allison University (Sackville), September 1932 to January 1934, and Acadian University (Wolfville, Nova Scotia), January to June 1934 (pre-medical studies). Then took an Aero Engine Mechanics Course at Curtiss Wright Institute of Aeronautics, California. "Worked for Amelia Earhart Union Air Terminal, California, 1936-1937". Received Private Pilots License in California, having flowm 32 hours dual and solo by the time he applied to the RAF. Also a local surveyor and scaler in lumber industry. When interviewed in September 1937 by Lieutenant-Colonel A.H.W. Landon for RAF consideration, he was described thus: "Good type - smart - intelligent. Keenly interested in aviation. Has a good personality and is considered suitable to hold a commission. Has gone to great pains to endeavour to fit himself for professional aviation". Enlisted August 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 29 October 1938. Attended Elementary Flying Training School at Middlesex, August to 9 November 1938; No.3 Service Flying Training School, South Cerney, November 1938 to May 1939; Torpedo Training Unit, Gosport, June-30 July 1939; No.42 Squadron, Thorney Island, August to 15 December 1939; No.254 Squadron (Blenheims), January to July 1940 (anti-submarine patrols and fishing fleet patrols); No.42 Squadron, Wick, July to November 1940 (Beauforts and torpedo training); promoted Flying Officer, 3 September 1940. At No.1 School of General Reconnaissance, Blackpool (instructor), November 1940 to January 1941. To No.31 School of General Reconnaissance, Charlottetown, January 1941 to August 1942; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941. With No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Canada, August 1942 to February 1945; promoted Squadron Leader, 1 June 1943. No.1 Radio and Navigation School, Summerside, February 1945 to end of war. AFRO 1129/41 dated 3 October 1941 reported his promotion from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant, effective 3 September 1941; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944. Applied for transfer from the RAF to the RCAF on 29 March 1943; transferred to RCAF 20 October 1944 while serving at No.1 General Reconnaissance School (C49078); to No.1 Radio and Navigation School, 4 February 1945; to Air Navigation School, 16 September 1945l ; to Station Greenwood, 17 December 1945; to Eastern Air Command, 10 March 1946; to Dartmouth, 5 November 1946; to Goose Bay, 7 December 1946. To Dartmouth, 8 February 1947; released 13 February 1947. Died 28 December 1987 in Saint John, New Brunswick as per Royal Canadian Legion “Last Post” website and Legion Magazine of March 1988. Recommended on 3 August 1944 by G/C A. Lewis; as of that date he had flown 2,381 hours (142 in previous six months) of which 1,550 hours had been on instructional duties (142 in previous six months). As of that date he was also credited with 355 operational hours (78 sorties). // This officer, who has had an extensive career in operational and instructional flying, has displayed energy, efficiency and organizing ability far above the ordinary course of duty. As officer commanding a flying squadron, he has proven himself to be a capable and efficient leader. The consistently high record of flying hours with no casualties maintained at this unit are largely due to this officer's capable supervision. // Recommendation raised 3 August 1944 by G/C A. Lewis, No.1 GRS, Summerside. To date he had flown 2,381 hours (142 in previous six months) of which 1,550 had been instructional (142 in past six months). Also credited with 78 sorties (355 operational hours). // This officer has displayed energy, efficiency and organising ability far beyond the ordinary course of duty. By night and day he has consistently been on duty many long hours over and above the normal working hours and by personal supervision has been responsible for the consistently high record of monthly flying hours with no loss of life during his regime as Flying Squadron Commander. // Notes: Assessed 20 March 1943 - “Flight Lieutenant Taylor has had considerable experience as a Flight Commander and has fulfilled those duties most satisfactorily, He is dependable, respected by his subordinates and has proved his ability to accept greater responsibilities.” (S/L A.J. Mould, No.1 GRS). // Application for Operational Wing dated 18 January 1946 listed the following sorties: // With No.22 Squadron: // 11 November 1939 - Anson I - Convoy Patrol (3.20) // 14 November 1939 - Anson I - Convoy Patrol (3.10) // 21 November 1939 - Anson I - Convoy Patrol (3.15) // 23 November 1939 - Anson I - Convoy Patrol (4.15) // 24 November 1939 - Anson I - Convoy Patrol (3.55) // With No.254 Squadron: // 22 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishing Fleet Patrol (3.25) // 24 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.30) // 25 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (4.25) // 28 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishing Fleet Patrol (3.45) // 30 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishing Fleet Patrol (3.30) // 31 January 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Armed Patrol (2.45) // 4 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.45) // 8 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet Patrol (4.45) // 12 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.45) // 13 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.25) // 15 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (4.35) // 20 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.55) // 22 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet Patrol (3.45) - He,111 V shot down // 24 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.25) // 26 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (4.10) // 28 February 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet Patrol (4.15) - He.111 V escaped in cloud. // 3 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet Patrol (4.35) // 4 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet Patrol (3.50) // 5 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Sea search, naval units (4.55) // 7 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet (3.20) // 7 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Armed Search Patrol, Light Ship (3.45) // 8 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet (4.20) - downed Heinkel float plane // 9 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (3.25) // 9 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (4.25) // 11 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Search, naval units (4.45) // 13 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Dusk Patrol, Light Ships (4.45) // 15 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy (4.45) // 17 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Fleet (3.45) // 19 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Naval Search (5.05) // 21 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy Escort (4.55) // 22 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Convoy Escort (4.55) // 24 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Armed Search Patrol (3.35) // 27 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Search for buoys, sub nets off Denmark (4.50) // 30 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Skagerak Patrol (5.25) // 31 March 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Fishery Patrol (3.40) // 8 April 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Search (4.25) // 10 April 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - recce and photo of Stavanger airport (5.25) // 11 April 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Patrol (1.45) // 13 April 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Patrol (4.25) // 16 April 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Patrol to Norway (4.25) // 24 May 1940 - Blenheim IV - English Channel - Patrol French coast (2.55) // 28 May 1940 - Blenheim IV - North Sea - Patrol and recce Norway (4.45) // 29 May 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (1.45) // 31 May 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (3.45) // 12 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Armed Patrol (3.50) - Attacked float plane, crash landed. // 15 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Search (4.45) // 16 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Fishing Fleet (3.45) // 17 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy Patrol (3.55) // 19 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Fishing Fleet (4.10) // 20 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (3.00) // 24 June 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (4.45) // With No.42 Squadron: // 4 July 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (3.25) // 9 July 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (4.45) // 12 July 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (4.15) // 18 July 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (4.15) // 25 July 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (2.55) // 4 August 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (3.45) // 5 August 1940 - Blenheim IV - Convoy (2.25)
TAYLOR, Frank Harold Lieutenant, SEE DESCRIPTION, SEE DESCRIPTION Military Cross British Flying Services WWI
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TAYLOR, Lieutenant Frank Harold - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Born 11 August 1896 in Toronto; home there. Service in 109th Battalion of Militia. Enlisted in CEF, 13 September 1916. Embarked from Halifax, 27 September 1916 as part of an Officers Draft.; arrived in Liverpool, 1 October 1916. Posted to Shorncliffe on 6 October 1916. Attached to 180 Battalion, Shoreham, 29 December 1916. Attached to 3nd (Reserve) Battalion, CEF, 6 January 1917. Attached RFC with effect from 4 April 1917. At Hythe or Brooklands, 4 April 1917; to Reading, 14 May 1917; seconded to RFC, 6 June 1917; to Vendome, 10 June 1917; to 45 TS, 17 July 1917. Graded as Flying Officer and formally seconded to RFC, 10 September 1917. arrived in France and posted to No.41 Squadron, 22 September 1917, serving with that unit to to 13 May 1918 when transferred to Home Establishment. To Canada on leave, 14 May 1918; to Southeast area, 29 August 1918; to No.2 Flying School, 9 September 1918; with No.84 Squadron, 14 September 1918 to 5 March 1919. Promoted Captain, 15 November 1918. A card also says that he ceased to be seconded to RAF as of that dated, but his medical reports mention contusions from an aircraft crash in February 1919 and another entry on another form states that he ceased to be seconded to RAF as of 18 March 1919. Relinquished RAF commission, 18 March 1919 on return to 3rd Reserve Battalion. Sailed for Canada, 7 May 1919 but elsewhere it is stated that he was taken on strength of CEF in Canada, 7 May 1919 for general demobilisation, and struck off strength of CEF as of 17 May or 23 May 1919. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, whilst on offensive patrol, he shot down a hostile scout in flames and a second out of control. On the following day he shot down an enemy triplane, which finally crashed to earth. During the recent operations he has carried out many successful attacks on enemy infantry from low altitudes, and has taken part in over eight offensive patrols. His gallantry and good service merit the highest praise. Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation as forwarded from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 5 April 1918: For gallantry and good work during the operations March 21st to March 31st, 1918. On March 23rd, 1918, whilst on offensive patrol, this officer attacked a formation of Albatross Scouts. He destroyed one which fell in flames, and shot down a second out of control. Both these machines fell in the neighbourhood of Bourlon Wood. On March 24th, 1918, whilst on offensive patrol, this officer shot down a Fokker Triplane which crashed near Vaulx. Lieutenant Taylor has taken part in 84 offensive patrols and has done 158 hours flying over the enemy's lines. During the recent fighting he has made many successful attacks on enemy infantry from low altitudes. In all he has destroyed five enemy aeroplanes, one in flames, four crashed, and one driven down out of control. Public Record Office Air 1/1226/204/5/2634/84, copies in National Library and Archive MG 30 D ADM, Box 22 (Reference 1000303862) has the following Combat Reports relevant to him: 3rd November 1918 Squadron 84; SE.5a aircraft F.855 (Vickers and Lewis machine guns) Lieutenant F.H. Taylot, MC Time: 1530 hours Locality: Foret de Mormal Duty: Offensive Patrol Height: 7,000 feet Result: Destroyed - nil Driven down out of control - one Driven down - nil Hostile aircraft: Grey Fokker biplane Narrative At 1530 while on patrol over Foret de Mormal, we encountered five Fokker biplanes, flying just under clouds. I fired 100 rounds at one Fokker, and it was observed to go down out of control by Lieutenants Cooke and MacDonald. Report annotated “1 one out control”; also typed “Confirmed as going down out of control” (Lieutenant H.O. MacDonald and Second Lieutenant J.G. Coote. 10th November 1918 Squadron 84; SE.5a aircraft F.904 and F.855 (Vickers and Lewis machine guns) Major C.E.M. Pickthord, MC (Army Service Corps (Special Reserve and RAF) and Lieutenant F.H. Taylor, MC (1st Ontario Regiment and RAF). Time: 1000 hours Locality: east of Chimay Duty: Low Offensive Patrol Height: 7,000 feet Result: Destroyed - 2 Fokker Biplanes Driven down out of control - nil Driven down - 1 Fokker Biplane; one L.V,G. 2-seater Hostile aircraft: 4 Fokker Biplanes; 1 Two-seater L.V.G. Narrative At 10 p.m. at about 7,000 feet over Mariembourg, patrol attacked four E.A. Fokker Biplanes at varying heights. 1. Lieutenant Taylor fired about 200 rounds into 1 E.A. which went into a spin. Machine flattened out at about 1,000 feet and shortly after nose-dived into the ground S.E. of Fagnolle. 2. Major Pickthorn attacked a second E.A. which landed and turned over east of Matagne. 3. Captain [L.de S.] Duke attacked a third E.A. which went down in a spin followed by Lieutenant [J.M.] Bacon to about 1,000 feet. E.A. then flattened out and Lieutenant Bacon lost sight of it in turning to look for further E.A. 4. At 10.45 a.m. Major Pickthorn and Lieutenant Taylor attacked an E.A. two-seater East of Cimay, firing about 50 rounds each at long range. E.A. dived east and could not be caught. Report annotated in pencil, “Two crash.” According to C.F. Wise, this combat may have been the last RAF aerial victory of the war and the last scored by a Canadian - but see William Stanley Jenkins. Air 1/838/204/5/285 (Brigade Work Summaries, March 1918), copied into Library and Archives Canada MG 40 D.1 Volume 17, has the following under date 18 March 1918: Lieut. Taylor, No.41 Squadron, crashed an E.A. two-seater. This is confirmed by A.A. batteries. Same file, date of 23 March 1918, No.41 Squadron pilots: Lieutenant Taylor drove an Albatross Scout down out of control over Bourlon Wood. Same file, date of 25 March 1918: Captain Smith, Lt. Taylor, 2/Lt Marchant, 2/Lt Goodyear, 2/Lt. Davis and 2/Lt. Hemming fired a total of 3,000 rounds from 1,000 to 500 feet on roads round Bapaume on bodies of enemy infantry in artillery formation.
TAYLOR, Merrill Samuel Lieutenant, SEE DESCRIPTION, SEE DESCRIPTION Croix de Guerre (France) British Flying Services WWI
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TAYLOR, Lieutenant Merrill Samuel - Croix de Guerre (France) - date and authority not certain; mentioned in DNS 7-3 files and University of Toronto Roll of Service. Born 15 April 1893 at Singhampton, Ontario; educated there plus Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan, Regina, and University of Toronto (Applied Science, 1912-1916). Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 January 1917 and posted effective that date to Crystal Palace; to Chingford, 10 March 1917; to Cranwell, 19 July 1917; appointed Flight Sub-Lieutenant, August 1917; to Dover Patrol, 23 August 1917; to No.9 (N) Squadron, September 1917 until 7 July 1918 (killed in action); elsewhere reported as killed 6 October 1918 but the Commonwealth War Graves records the earlier date. Commemorated on Arras Flying Services Memorial which commemorates almost 1,000 airmen of the Royal Naval Air Service, the Royal Flying Corps, and the Royal Air Force, either by attachment from other arms of the forces of the Commonwealth or by original enlistment, who were killed on the whole Western Front and who have no known grave. The Commonwealth War Graves entry mentions him as having a Croix de Guerre, but as of 10 July 2016 the London Gazette entry has not been found, and his sparse RAF record (Air 76/498) does not mention it. Air 1/1228/204/5/2634/209 has a Combat Report which includes him: 17 April 1918 Type of Aeroplane: Sopwith BR.1 Armament: two synchronized Vickers guns. Pilots: Lieutenants Redgate, Foster, Taylor. Time: 2.45 p.m. Duty: H.O.P. [high offensive patrol] Locality: East of Villers Brettenau Height: 2,000 feet Remarks on Hostile Machine - Type, armament, speed - five Albatross V-Strutters. Narrative We attacked five E.A. which were travelling west at 2,000 feet. Lieutenant Foster and myself attacked one , firing at close range. E.A.was observed to fall doing flat turns. Lieutenant Foster observed one of the E.A. crashed on the ground at P.27c62D. Lieutenant Taylor was firing at about 25 yards range at another E.A. which went down smoking badly. Lieutenant Mellerish observed E.A. smoking but was unable to follow him down as he disappeared into the clouds. The E.A. pilots did not seem capable of turning their machines to their best advantage. [signed by W.O. Redgate].
TAYLOR, Kenneth Garth Squadron Leader, No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Summerside, Prince Edward Island, RAF 41331 Air Force Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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TAYLOR, S/L Kenneth Garth (RAF 41331) - Air Force Cross - No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Summerside, Prince Edward Island - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Canadian serving in the RAF; from Port Elgin, New Brunswick; enlisted August 1938. Later flew Beaufighters in No.254 Squadron and Hudsons in No.233 Squadron. When recommended he had flown 2,381 hours total, 1,330 hours as instructor, 142 hours in previous six months. Transferred to RCAF (C49078). This officer, who has had an extensive career in operational and instructional flying, has displayed energy, efficiency and organizing ability far above the ordinary course of duty. As officer commanding a flying squadron, he has proven himself to be a capable and efficient leader. The consistently high record of flying hours with no casualties maintained at this unit are largely due to this officer's capable supervision.
HANCHET-TAYLOR, Albert Jesse Group Captain, RCAF Station Goose Bay (now Station Sydney), C1775 Officer, Order of the British Empire RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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HANCHET-TAYLOR, G/C Albert Jesse (C1775) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - RCAF Station Goose Bay (now Station Sydney) - Awarded 14 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette dated 14 November 1944 AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944. Home in Southport, Connecticut; enlisted in Montreal, 21 March 1940 in Administrative Branch. Promoted Wing Commander, 22 September 1941. Appointed Acting Group Captain, 4 September 1942; confirmed in that rank, 4 September 1943. Posted that date to Goose Bay. To Sidney, 7 October 1944. To Eastern Air Command Headquarters, 1 April 1945. To No.1 Release Centre, 22 April 1946; retired 23 April 1946 to Toronto. See also FS C.H. Brooks and Sgt H.G.J. Saye (BEM). // On the 6th of July, 1944, in Labrador, a Ventura aircraft, carrying eleven passengers and crew, crashed on take-off and immediately burst into flames. This officer was one of the first to arrive at the scene of the accident. The fire had already reached intense proportions and ammunition and pyrotechnics were exploding. On seeing a man moving in the wreckage, without a moment's hesitation, Group Captain Hanchet-Taylor rushed into the aircraft to find the man and with considerable difficulty removed him from the flaming aircraft. The airman later died from injuries and burns but this officer's gallant act might have saved his life. His example was an inspiration to other personnel to endeavour to rescue the other victims of the accident. This officer displayed exceptional coolness, courage and devotion to duty in the face of grave danger. // He was also involved in rescuing the crew of Liberator 586 which crashed in Labrador, 19 February 1944; see entries for S/L Al Imrie and F/L G.R. Harland.
TAYLOR, Alexander Keith Flying Officer, No.500 Squadron, C8111 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Alexander Keith (C8111) - Mention in Despatches - No.500 Squadron - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Born 14 November 1918. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 14 April 1941. Commissioned 13 September 1941 after training at University of Manitoba. To McMaster University, 1 October 1941; to Station Trenton, 19 October 1941; to Technical Training School, St.Thomas, 17 November 1941; to No.31 Radio School, Clinton, 13 December 1941 to 13 March 1942; Embarked from Canada on 13 March 1942; arrived at No.3 PRC, 24 March 1942; to Headquarters, No.15 Group, 15 April 1942; to Station Stornoway, 16 April 1942; to No.500 Squadron, 4 August 1942. Proceeded with that unit to North Africa, November 1942; struck off strength of that squadron, 5 August 1943; to UK, 9 September 1943; to Headquarters, Middle East, 12 January 1944, arriving in Egypt 30 January 1944; to Headquarters, Middle East, 7 February 1944; to Headquarters, Mediterranean Allied Air Forces, 30 November 1944; ; repatriated 21 August 1945; released in Vancouver, 31 August 1945.Unit not identified in AFRO but found in DHist file 181.009 D.1711 "Honours and Awards - Awards to RCAF Personnel in Middle East" (NAC RG.24 Box 20605).
TAYLOR, Allan Douglas Flight Lieutenant, No.92 Squadron, J25790 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/L Allan Douglas (J25790) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.92 Squadron - Award effective 12 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 14 June 1920 in Grey City, Ontario; educated in Beamsville (home there, farmer, employee of McKinnon Industries, St. Catharines, auto parts inspector); enlisted in Hamilton, 11 March 1942; posted that day to No.1 Manning Depot, Toronto. To No.4 BGS, Fingal, 26 June 1942 (non-flying duties). To No.1 ITS, Toronto, 15 August 1942. Graduated 9 October 1942 and promoted LAC. Posted to No.20 EFTS, Oshawa, 7 November 1942. To No.6 SFTS, Dunnville, 10 December 1942. Graduated and commissioned, 30 April 1943. To “Y” Depot, Halifax, 14 May 1943. Embarked from Canada, 23 June 1943. Disembarked in Britain, 1 July 1943. To No.7 (Pilots) AFU, 6 August 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 30 October 1943. To No.2 Personnel Despatch Centre, 4 December 1943. To Port of Embarkation, 12 December 1943. Disembarked in Egypt, 3 January 1944. To No.5 (Middle East) ARC (whatever that is), 3 January 1944. To OTU, Abu Sueir, 6 February 1944. To No.22 Personnel Despatch Centre, 26 March 1944. To Headquarters, Tunis Base Area, 15 April 1944. To Headquarters, Desert Air Force, 1 May 1944. To No.92 Squadron, 6 June 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 13 January 1945. To No.56 Personnel Transit Centre, 14 March 1945. To No.22 Personnel Transit Centre, 11 April 1945. Emplaned from Italy, 18 May 1945, arriving in Britain 19 May 1945. Repatriated to Canada, 5 August 1945. To No.4 Release Centre, 10 August 1945. Released 14 September 1945. Died in Mississauga, Ontario, 1979. Photograph PL-36610 is a formal portrait. Decoration presented 28 May 1947. Recommended when he had flown 120 sorties (150 operational hours). // Flight Lieutenant Taylor has proved himself to be an outstanding fighter bomber pilot. He has completed a very large number of operational sorties and by his consistent skill, enthusiasm and devotion to duty he has set an excellent example to all pilots. In September 1944, this officer, leading a formation of six aircraft, succeeded in locating a concentration of enemy troops which were massing for a counter attack against Giovanni di Galilea. Despite heavy anti-aircraft fire he bombed and machine gunned the enemy troops so successfully that the counter attack was entirely broken off and our troops were able to enter the town unopposed. The whole operation was worthy of high commendation. // NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9150 has recommendation dated 2 January 1945 when he had flown 120 sorties (150 operational hours). // Flying Officer Taylor joined No.92 Squadron on 6th June 1944 and has now completed 150 hours operational flying. In the period during which the squadron was engaged on interception duties, Flying Officer Taylor obtained one ME.109 probably destroyed over Spezia. During the last three months Flying Officer Taylor has been fully capable of leading a flight and has done so on numerous occasions. His own individual bombing has been consistently of the highest standard of accuracy. // On 25th September 1944, Flying Officer Taylor, leading six aircraft, succeeded in locating a concentration of enemy troops massing for a counter attack at Giovanni di Galilea, Despite heavy flak he bombed and strafed so successfully that the counter attack was entirely broken up, the Colonel was killed and out troops were able to enter the town unopposed. The whole operation, warmly commended by the Army, was essentially due to Flying Officer Taylor. // Throughout his tour and especially during the recent period of close support, Flying Officer Taylor has been a tower of strength to the squadron and an inspiration to his brother pilots. His professional skill, dash and determination have bee outstanding and he has contributed in every possible way to the success of the squadron. // Notes: Assessed 25 March 1945 by Major J.E. Gasson, No.92 Squadron, when he had flown 591 hours (100 in past six months). “Outstandingly loyal and reliable. Has been an exceptional flight commander both in the air and on the ground.” // Application for Operational Wing dated 24 March 1945 stated he had flown 157 sorties (195 operational hours), 6 June 1944 to 11 March 1945; also 396 non-operational hours. // Repatriation form dated 10 July 1945 stated he had flown 157 sorties (195 operational hours), the last on 11 March 1945; also 171.10 non-operational hours. Types flown overseas were Master (79.05), Harvard (21.10) and Spitfire (265.45). Claimed one “probable” enemy aircraft. // Training: Attended No.1 ITS, 17 August to 9 October 1942. Courses in Mathematics, Law and Discipline, Navigation, General Studies, Anti-Gas Armament (written), Aircraft Recognition, Drill, Signals (written) and Meteorology. Scored 760 points of a possible 1,000. Placed 40th in a class of 64. “A quiet, reserved, capable airman, who does not show much initiative. Has plenty of ability if he can be encouraged to apply himself.” // Attended No.20 EFTS, 9 November to 30 December 1942. Tiger Moth aircraft - ten hours 50 minutes dual to first solo, 33.10 day dual, 29.00 day solo, 4.00 night dual. Was 10.45 on instruments. Logged 11.30 in Link. Ground courses in Navigation, Airmanship, Armament (written and practical), Aircraft Recognition and Signals (practical). Scored 554 points of a possible 700. Placed 15th in a class of 31. “Should make a good steady pilot with more time on forced landings. Side slipping should be improved, also steep turns and aerobatics.” // Attended No.6 SFTS, 11 January to 30 April 1943. Harvard aircraft - 8.40 dual to first solo, 73.05 day dual, 69.55 day solo, 4.50 night dual, 10.15 night solo. Was 16.40 in formation and 26.00 on instruments. Logged 20 hours in Link. Ground examinations in Navigation, Airmanship,, Armament (written and practical), Aircraft Recognition ,Signals (written and practical) and Meteorology. Scored 5792points of a possible 750. Placed 30th in a class of 42. “Flying improved steadily. Good average results.. Worked well. Deportment very good.” // Attended No.7 (Pilots) AFU, 6 August to 23 November 1943. Master aircraft - 2.25 day dual to first day solo, 19/30 total day dual, 47.10 solo day,1.15 night dual to first night solo, 5.00 total night dual, 8.25 night solo. Was 11.00 in formation, 3.20 on instruments and logged 12.15 in Link. Flying tests in General Flying (200/400), Applied Flying (100/200), Instrument Flying (125/250), Night Flying (65/100) and Link (30/50). “An average pilot who seems to have done quite well throughout the course/ Spinning recovery very good. Instrument flying good. Fit for solo on operational aircraft at night. No serious faults; he flew on several very dark nights.” // Attended OTU, Abu Sueir, 7 February to 17 March 1944. Harvard aircraft (3.25 dual to first solo, 8.25 total dual, 12.55 solo) and Spitfire (29 hours 50 minutes). Was 17.50 in formation, 2.45 on instruments, logged five hours in Link. Damaged a Harvard on 10 March 1944 (engine failure). Fired 400 rounds air-to-ground, 900 rounds air-to-air, exposed 125 feet of film. Flying tests in General Flying (250/400), Applied Flying (125/200), Instrument Flying (160/250) and Link (27/50). Ground examinations in Airmanship (222/300), Armament (235/300), Meteorology (73/100), Navigation (111/200) and Signals (74/100). “An extremely conscientious and sober pilot.”
TAYLOR, Bertram Flying Officer, No.192 Squadron, J27484 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Bertram (J27484) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.192 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born 1919 in Uxbridge, Ontario; home in Phippen, Saskatchewan (assistant geologist); enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 19 June 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 25 June 1943). Commissioned 1943. Decoration presented at Sea Island, 25 November 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/8830 has recommendation dated 15 November 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (148 hours), 10 June 1944 to 30 October 1944. In all the sorties listed, the job is described as "Special Duty". 10 Jun 44 Dreux (4.20) 29 Aug 44 Stettin (8.30) 12 Jun 44 Gelsenkirchen (3.05) 2 Sept 44 Lofoten Islands (9.05) 27 Jun 44 Paris (3.45) 11 Sep 44 Gladbach (3.00) 15 Jul 44 Nevers (7.25) 13 Sep 44 Darmstadt (4.40) 17 Jul 44 Dutch coast (1.50) 15 Sep 44 Dutch coast (7.10) 18 Jul 44 Scholven (Ruhr) 3.00 17 Sep 44 East of Saarbrucken (4.25) 20 Jul 44 Le Havre (2.45) 27 Sep 44 Kaiserslautern (4.25) 24 Jul 44 Stuttgart (7.15) 28 Sep 44 North of Zwolle (2.35) 28 Jul 44 Dutch coast (3.25) 5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken (5.30) 8 Aug 44 North Sea patrol (3.40) 6 Oct 44 Bremen (4.10) 10 Aug 44 Dijon (6.10) 9 Oct 44 Bochum (4.35) 12 Aug 44 Brunswick (5.00) 14 Oct 44 Brunswick (6.35) 16 Aug 44 Kiel (4.10) 23 Oct 44 Essen (4.50) 18 Aug 44 Sterkrade (3.00) 25 Oct 44 Essen (3.35) 26 Aug 44 German and Dutch 30 Oct 44 Wesseling (3.25) coasts (3.55) As navigator of a heavy bomber aircraft, this officer has completed a tour of operations including attacks on distant and heavily defended targets. He has at all times shown a cheerful desire to participate in operational flying and the high standard of his navigation has been largely responsible for the success of his sorties. NOTE: The Station Commander's remarks (dated 19 November 1944) are interesting in that they throw a little more light on the nature of his work: Taylor has proved himself to be a first class operational navigator. His tour has, for the most part been carried out against main force targets and his accuracy in his work has led to much valuable information being obtained from the investigation flights on which he has been employed.
TAYLOR, Cameron John Wilde Squadron Leader, No.407, J6857 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, S/L Cameron John Wilde (J6857) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.407 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 11 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born 18 January 1912 in Winnipeg; home there; enlisted there 16 December 1940 and immediately posted to No.2 Manning Depot. To No.7 Equipment Depot, 15 January 1941. To No.2 ITS, 4 March 1941; graduated 8 April 1941 and promoted LAC; to No.13 EFTS, 8 April 1941; to No.8 SFTS, 28 May 1941; graduated and commissioned 20 August 1941. To “Y” Depot, 21 August 1941. To RAF overseas, 9 December 1941. Promoted Flying Officer, 20 August 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 10 March 1943. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 August 1943. Repatriated to Canada early in 1944 for Staff College and was in Toronto as of 17 June 1944. To “Y” Depot, 30 September 1944; to United Kingdom again, 5 October 1944. Repatriated 23 July 1945; released 3 October 1945. Died in Kelowna, 20 July 2005 as per Legion Last Post. Photo PL-5689 shows the following personnel (all LACs at the time): Front Row, C.W. Palmer (Dundalk, Ontario), C.J.W. Taylor, A. Horn (Hamilton), H.W. Rowlands (Fergus, Ontario), C.B. Smith (West Pembroke); Second Row: P.S. Calvesbert (Brantford), W.D. Smith (Embro, Ontario), P.W. Porter (Hamilton), F.G. Stratham (Hamilton), C.M. Park (London). Photo PL-15835 shows Taylor, 24 August 1943, with F/O Don Bier (Woodstock) and F/O George Caey (Edmonton). DFC and Bar presented 10 May 1948. // This officer has displayed great courage and skill as captain of aircraft. He has completed a large number of sorties against enemy shipping and many anti-submarine patrols by night. Squadron Leader Taylor has in addition been largely responsible for the supervision of the operational training of all the crews in the squadron, both in the air and on the ground. His determination and devotion to duty have been most praiseworthy. // TAYLOR, S/L Cameron John Wilde (J6857) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.407 Squadron. Awarded 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette of 8 May 1945 and AFRO 966/45 dated 8 June 1945. // Squadron Leader Taylor is an outstanding flight commander who has participated in a large number of operational sorties. He is an excellent leader and the high standard of operational efficiency attained by his squadron is largely owing to his enthusiasm and untiring efforts. Towards the end of 1944, this officer was captain of an aircraft when a U-Boat was sighted. As the result of his determined and well executed attack the enemy submarine was probably sunk. // Public Record Office Air 2/9078 has recommendation drafted 9 March 1945 when he had flown 58 sorties (450 hours); see also entry for F/L C.D. Myers. // On the night of 29th/30th December 1944 this officer was captain of L/407 when a schorkeling U-Boat was“probably sunk” as a result of a determined and well executed attack against an exceedingly difficult and elusive target. This attack typifies Squadron Leader Taylor’s outstanding drive, efficiency and high qualities of leadership. // Aircraft referred to on 29/30 December is Wellington Service Number L/407/NC844, locality 5005N 0229W. // The Station Commander added his remarks on 14 March 1945 - an unusually long endorsement: // This officer is an outstanding flight commander and second in command of an A/U Squadron, the efficiency of which is largely due to his untiring effort. // The enthusiasm and zeal with which he does about his operational training and administrative duties within the unit is beyond all praise and an example to all aircrew personnel. // I consider that the award of a Bar to the DFC is a well deserved reward for continual good work, results of which bore fruit on the night of December 29/30, 1944. // The following story, submitted by Ross Hamilton (former Adjutant of No.407 Squadron) appeared in the December 2002 issue of Short Bursts (Air Gunner Association newsletter: // Christmas 1944 // 407 Demon Squadron, RCAF, Chivenor, North Devon, UK // One of our highly esteemed Flight Commanders, S/L Taylor, DFC & Bar, had decided that his guys on 407 were not going to be subjected to Christmas dinner of brussel sprouts, sans turkey, and he was about to do something about it. S/L Taylor was one of the original pilots on 407 Squadron when it was formed at Thorney Island in April 1941. He was one of the few survivors from the “short life expectancy “ era of flying Hudsons on the deadly enemy shipping strikes off the Dutch coast, and also on the first 1000-bomber raids on Germany. Thus he was a highly experienced airman and a force to be reckoned with. // The S/L, having relieved the Station Mess Officer of all “extra messing funds”, contacted an old friend, the messing Officer at RAF Station Limivady where he had once been stationed in Northern Ireland. Could his friend, by any chance, lay his hands on a few turkeys for the lads at Chivenor if he, Taylor, flew up to get them? No problem, how many do you want. (Rationing was not that severe in Ireland). // A couple of hours flying in a Leigh Light Wellington, without the usual crew complement, of course, S/L Taylor landed in Limivady. On arrival he was treated to numerous rounds in the mess by old acquaintances, and a fine “thrash” was soon in the making. // Finally, time to get back to Chivenor. “Messing Officer, are the turkeys ready to go?” “Yes sir, just taxi your aircraft to the other side of the airfield and a farmer will be waiting there with your birds.” The taxing detail was carried out and sure enough, the farmer was there waiting – with some 30 or 40 turkeys. You guessed it, they were all live! // Apparently the flight back to Chivenor was as interesting as any op trip, and one not likely to be experienced again. As related by the S/L, he was flying South East at 178 knots, with the crew of turkeys, airbourne enmass, flying due North at 7 to 10 knots, with numerous circuits in and out of the cockpit. He is still trying to compute the ground speed of both parties. // The grateful Canadians of 407 Chivenor thus were able to enjoy a good old home style Christmas turkey dinner, sans even one brussel sprout – all thanks to one very enterprising and caring Flight Commander who always put his ground crews and aircrews first. // One such practice, and perhaps why many of us are around today – every 407 aircraft that came out of maintenance, and before going back on the line, was thoroughly air-tested by S/L Taylor, always flying solo. Only then would he permit it to be delivered to the flight line. // As for the Wimpy that was borrowed for the Turkey Op., it was put U/S for a few days until the interior could be returned to some semblance of habitation. The guys participating in the cleaning job were amply supplied with beer by the grateful aircrews for as long as it took to complete the job. // S/L Taylor DFC & Bar is a legend unto himself. He resides in Kelowna B.C. and at age 87 (in 1998) was still putting in a 12 hour day at his heavy-construction consulting business. The heavy construction firm he built post-war produced the Trans Canada Highway through the Rockies. His philosophy is simple and to the point, “If you stop using that thing sitting on your shoulders – you lose it.” // AMEN!
TAYLOR, Carl Clark Wing Commander, No.3 Bombing and Gunnery School, C2825 Air Force Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, W/C Carl Clark (C2825) - Air Force Cross - No.3 Bombing and Gunnery School - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Tennessee, 11 December 1899 as per RCAF Press Release reporting award; private schooling in Dallas; home given as Los Angeles; enlisted in Ottawa, 25 September 1940. To No.1 BGS, 22 November 1940. To Station Mountain View, 6 March 1942. To No.1 BGS, 4 May 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 July 1942. To No.7 BGS, 6 July 1942. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 November 1942. To No.3 BGS, 16 June 1943, serving there to 11 October 1943. Possibly overseas briefly, but posted again to No.3 BGS, 3 January 1944. Promoted Wing Commander, 1 October 1944. Posted away from No.3 BGS, 7 January 1945; retired 8 January 1945. Died in Los Angeles, 27 January 1960. Had completed 1,229 flying hours to date of recommendation. Award presented 17 December 1945. // This officer has served as chief instructor at this unit for fifteen months and has produced a very high degree of training efficiency, both on the ground and in the air. He has continuously set a fine example of devotion to duty to those working under him and has taken an active part in air exercises. The excellent air gunner training given at this unit is largely the result of this officer's personal efforts and example. He has made a valuable contribution to bombing and gunnery training.
TAYLOR, David Robb Flight Lieutenant, No.419 Squadron, J22498 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/L David Robb (J22498) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 18 July 1917 in Regina; home there. Educated in Saskatchewan including one year at Luther College. Clerk, stenographer and commercial traveller. Served in 2nd Battalion, Regina Rifles, 1940-1941; enlisted in Regina, 30 May 1941 and posted to No.2 Manning Depot. To No.3 SFTS, Calgary, 15 August 1941 (guard). To No.4 ITS, Edmonton, 14 September 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 26 October 1941. To No.5 EFTS, High River, 27 October 1941; ceased training and posted to Composite Training School, Trenton, 12 December 1941. To No. 4 AOS, London, 4 January 1942; to No.4 BGS, Fingal, 12 April 1942; to No.1 ANS, Rivers, 24 May 1942; graduated and commissioned 3 July 1942. To “Y” Depot, 5 July 1942. To No.31 OTU, 23 July 1942. Embarked from Canada, 25 September 1942. Disembarked in Britain, 9 October 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 3 January 1943. To No.23 OTU, 6 April 1943. To No.1659 Conversion Unit, 11 August 1943. To No.431 Squadron, 5 September 1943. To No.419 Squadron, 1 November 1943. Attached to No.1 Air Armament School, 15 April to 13 May 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 July 1944. To No.1664 Conversion Unit, 31 August 1944. To No.1666 Conversion Unit, 29 November 1944. Repatriated 2 August 1945. Retired 24 September 1945. Award presented 18 May 1955 via External Affairs. Photo PL-35865A is a portrait. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 27 September 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (187 hours five minutes), 2 October 1943 to 8 August 1944. Postwar civil servant and diplomat; retired 1980. Died in Ottawa, 16 April 1988. RCAF photo PL-31150 (ex UK-13255 dated 8 August 1944) shows F/O Dave Taylor (left, Regina) and S/L Jim Stewart, DFC (Montreal) being interrogated by Section Officer Sally Morton (Gore Bay, Ontario, “one of the few WD intelligence officers engaged in interrogation”), after raid on Stuttgart. Stewart wears the Stewart tartan scarf he wears on all sorties. // This officer has completed 30 bombing operations against the enemy and has always shown the highest courage and devotion to duty. On precision targets his bombing accuracy has been remarkable, he having secured no less than seven photographs plotted within 400 yards of the aiming point. On heavily defended targets, Flight Lieutenant Taylor has shown the greatest coolness and courage, and has invariably given his pilot instructions in a calm voice while insisting on a steady run over the target. On 28th January 1944, while attacking Berlin, he insisted on making a second orbit to ensure accurate bombing. // Flight Lieutenant Taylor's cheerfulness and coolness in moments of danger have been a great inspiration to the rest of the crew and I consider his unflagging zeal and contempt of danger fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // The sortie list follows; those of 2 October 1943 to 12 April 1944 were on Halifax aircraft; those from 22 May to 8 August 1944 were on Lancasters: // 2 October 1943 - mining, Baltic area (8.25) // 8 October 1943 - Hanover (4.50) // 11 November 1943 - Cannes (10.15) // 22 November 1943 - Berlin (7.50) // 26 November 1943 - Stuttgart (8.35) // 20 January 1944 - Berlin (8.20) // 28 January 1944 - Berlin (9.10) // 12 February 1944 - mining, Frisian Islands (4.20) // 19 February 1944 - Leipzig (7.45) // 3 March 1944 - Meulan (6.00) // 4 March 1944 - mining, Brest (6.00) // 11 March 1944 - mining, St. Nazaire (7.30) // 18 March 1944 - mining, Heligoland (4.45) // 23 March 1944 - Laon (5.55) // 8 April 1944 - mining, Frisians (3.55) // 12 April 1944 - mining, Heligoland (6.25) // 22 May 1944 - Dortmund (4.50) // 24 May 1944 - Aachen (4.50) // 7 June 1944 - Acheres (4.55) // 10 June 1944 - Versailles (5.35) // 15 June 1944 - Boulogne (4.40, day) // 20 June 1944 - St. Martin l’Hortier (4.15, day) // 27 June 1944 - Ardouval (4.55) // 12 July 1944 - Thiverny (2.50, day, duty not carried out) // 25 July 1944 - Stuttgart (9.30) // 28 July 1944 - Hamburg (5.50) // 1 August 1944 - Acquet (4.25, day) // 3 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (5.25, day) // 4 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (6.05, day) // 7 August 1944 - Caen (4.35) // 8 August 1944 - Foret de Chantilly (5.05) // Notes: Assessment dated 30 July 1944 by W/C W. Pleasance, noting he had flown 439 hours five minutes (85.35 in previous six months). “Generally above average officer and bomb aimer. Would make an excellent Bombing Leader. Keen and conscientious.” // Assessment dated 5 July 1945 by F/L G. Duncan Mitchell, counter-signed by W/C A.J. Lewington regarding instructional duty at No.1666 Heavy Conversion Unit: “This officer is a qualified bombing leader and has been deputy bombing leader at this unit. He has done satisfactory work and at times shown keenness and a sense of responsibility.” // Form on repatriation dated 8 July 1945 stated he had flown 31 sorties (the last on 8 August 1944) for 194 operational hours; also 149 hours 45 minutes non-operational. Experience on Wellingtons (92.10), Halifax II (165.30), Lancaster X (77.05) and Blenheim (9.00). // Application for Operational Wing dated 16 August 1944 claimed 31 sorties (194 hours), 2 October 1943 to 8 August 1944. // As with many men, his actual investiture was delayed. A letter dated 28 July 1955 (Canadian Ambassador, Washington, to Department of External Affairs, Ottawa, citing letter from Ottawa, 21 April 1955) included the following paragraph: // You will be interested to learn that after carrying out a most thorough search, I eventually succeeded in tracking Flight Lieutenant Taylor to an office in this Embassy. He has, it seems, been a member of the Department of External Affairs for something close to five years. I was delighted, therefore, to be able to hold in my office on Wednesday, May 18, an appropriate ceremony, attended by other officers of this Embassy, at which I duly presented to Flight Lieutenant Taylor the insigna of the Distinguished Flying Cross that you sent to this Embassy. You may wish to pass this information too the Department of National Defence to show our appreciation for their efforts to determine Mr. Taylor’s whereabouts. // Website http://www.yorkshire-aircraft.co.uk/aircraft/yorkshire/york43/lk640.html provides the following: // HALIFAX LK640 DAMAGED BY FLAK, RETURNED TO THOLTHORPE AIRFIELD. // On the night of 2nd / 3rd October 1943 the crew of this 431 Squadron aircraft took off at 19.01hrs to undertake a mine laying flight, during the flight the aircraft suffered from a number of the aircraft's navigation equipment failing and being rendered unservicable. The aircraft also suffered damage to one of the engines as a result of a flak burst from fire from a flak ship but the crew however managed to make a safe return to Tholthorpe airfield on the three good engines and landed safely at 03.23hrs. The aircraft was quickly repaired and was being flown by the same pilot within a week operationally again. This was the crew's first operational flight with 431 Squadron. The aircraft appears to have carried nose art depicting "Q-Queenie" and was lost on Ops with 431 Squadron on 19th November 1943. Crew were - Pilot - S/L Wilbur Prevence Pleasance, RCAF (C1395); Navigator - F/O Lorne Albert Rotstein, RCAF (J21910); Wireless Operator/Air Gunner - Sergeant Robert Mark Emsley, RAFVR (1213524); Bomb Aimer - P/O David Robert Taylor, RCAF (J22498); Air Gunner - Flight Sergeant Edward H. Ihde, RCAF (R159397); Air Gunner - Sergeant Jack F. Tagg, RCAF (R193140); Flight Engineer - Sergeant Morley David McGill, RCAF (R166007). This crew were posted to 419 Squadron by the end of October 1943. Unfortunately 419 Squadron had lost its commanding officer W/C G. A. McMurdy on 23rd October 1943 on raid to Kassel and S/L (Acting W/C) Pleasance was posted to 419 Squadron (with his crew) to become the new 419 Squadron Commanding Officer.
TAYLOR, Edward Arthur Thomas Flying Officer, No.252 Squadron, J20993 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Edward Arthur Thomas (J20993) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.252 Squadron - Award effective 28 April 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1186/44 dated 2 June 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 24 April 1923; home in Victoria; enlisted Vancouver, 23 September 1941. Initially selected for Air Gunner training but remustered to pilot. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942), No.16 EFTS (graduated 1 August 1942) and No.7 SFTS (graduated and commissioned 20 November 1942). Posted to No.31 GRS, 4 December 1942; to "Y" Depot, 27 February 1943. Killed in action 25 May 1944 in Aegean Sea (Beaufighter LZ518). Name on El Alamein Memorial. Award sent by registered mail to next-of-kin, 17 August 1948. One night in March 1944, Flying Officer Taylor was detailed for a meteorological flight. Having completed his task, he then flew on to seek enemy aircraft and succeeded in engaging and destroying two Junkers 52. At all times this officer has exhibited exceptional courage and determination.
TAYLOR, Eric Travis Pilot Officer, No.7 Squadron, J93520 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, P/O Eric Travis (J93520) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.7 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1945 and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Born 1918 in Saskatchewan; home in Keeler, Saskatchewan (farmer); enlisted in Regina, 11 June 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 6 March 1943) and No.3 BGS (graduated 3 September 1943). Award sent by registered mail 11 March 1950. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9070 has recommendation dated 20 February 1945 when he had flown 46 sorties (206 hours 25 minutes), 24 May 1944 to 2 February 1945. Warrant Officer at the time (R167763); commissioned 23 February 1945 with effect from 30 January 1945. 24 May 44 Boulogne (2.30) 4 Aug 44 Bec d'Ambes (7.40) 26 May 44 Angers (7.20) 8 Aug 44 Fort d'Englos (2.15) 7 June 44 Paris (3.25) 12 Aug 44 Brunswick (4.30) 8 June 44 Lisieux (3.35) 15 Aug 44 St.Trond (3.20) 10 Jun 44 Dreux (4.00) 18 Aug 44 Bremen (4.45) 11 Jun 44 Nantes (5.40) 14 Jun 44 Le Havre (3.20) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (3.40) 15 Jun 44 Vallenciennes (3.30) 19 Oct 44 Stuttgart (5.20) 18 Jun 44 Monteville (2.50) 1 Nov 44 Oberhausen (4.45) 23 Jun 44 L'Hey (2.05) 6 Nov 44 Gelsenkirchen (3.50) 27 Jun 44 Biennais (3.05) 18 Nov 44 Munster (4.35) 30 Jun 44 Villers Bocage (3.10) 20 Nov 44 Coblenz (4.40) 2 July 44 Beauvoir (3.00) 21 Nov 44 Aschaffenburg (5.20) 5 July 44 Watten (2.25) 26 Nov 44 Julich (3.25) 7 July 44 Vaires (4.25) 27 Nov 44 Freiburg (5.30) 12 Jul 44 Vaires (3.55) 28 Nov 44 Dortmund (3.45) 15 Jul 44 Chalons sur Marne 5 Dec 44 Soest (5.25) (6.20) 6 Dec 44 Leuna (6.40) 18 Jul 44 Enieville (3.15) 12 Dec 44 Essen (5.00) 20 Jul 44 Homberg (4.05) 2 Jan 45 Nuremburg (7.00) 23 Jul 44 Kiel (5.10) 13 Jan 45 Saarbrucken (4.40) 24 Jul 44 Stuttgart (7.10) 14 Jan 45 Leuna (8.00) 1 Aug 44 Coullonvilles (3.05) 28 Jan 45 Zuffenhausen 3 Aug 44 Bois de Cassen (3.30) 2 Feb 45 Ludwigshaven This Warrant Officer has now done 46 operational sorties against the enemy; eighteen of these have been in the Pathfinder Force, all Marker trips. He has at all times shown an utter disregard for danger, while his cheerfulness, co-operation, unselfishness at all times, and undoubted skill as an Air Gunner have inspired a high standard of morale in his crew. Warrant Officer Taylor has always displayed a magnificent spirit of determination to give of his best.
TAYLOR, Ernest Alfred Sergeant, No.405 Squadron, R81075 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Sergeant Ernest Alfred (R81075) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 12 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943 and AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943. See War Service Records 1939-1945 (Canadian Bank of Commerce, 1947). Born 22 June 1920 in Ottawa; educated in Vancouver. Bank employee from March 1937 onwards. Enlisted 22 November 1940 in Vancouver. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.3 WS (graduated 17 March 1941). Award presented at Buckingham Palace, 12 October 1943. See also DFC for F/O W.W. Colledge. War Service Records 1939-1945 says "Had several narrow escapes, once being hit by a German fighter and sent crashing into the sea after a raid on Bremen; at another time, after being hit, dropped 10,000 feet." Died 19 August 1944 following a motorcycle accident in Yorkshire. Sergeant Taylor has participated in many operational sorties. On one occasion he was serving as mid-upper gunner in an aircraft detailed for an anti-submarine patrol, when his aircraft was attacked by a formation of four Junkers 88. A running fight ensued, lasting thirty-six minutes, during which, as a result of the fine marksmanship of this airman, one hostile aircraft was shot down and others were damaged. Sergeant Taylor displayed skill, determination and courage.
TAYLOR, Fletcher Vaughan Squadron Leader, No.420 Squadron (now on loan to TCA), J15177 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, S/L Fletcher Vaughan (J15177) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron (now on loan to TCA) - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 15 January 1920 (see MI.9 report); home in Gull Lake, Saskatchewan (student and purchasing agent); enlisted Saskatoon, 26 September 1940. To No.7 Equipment Depot, 23 October 1940. To No.2 ITS, 16 November 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 21 December 1941; to No.6 EFTS, 22 December 1940; to No.2 SFTS, 9 February 1941; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 4 May 1941, although his posting to Embarkation Depot is shown as 30 April 1941. To RAF overseas, 8 May 1941. Further trained overseas at No.22 OTU, Wellesbourne. First tour was with No.405 Squadron, August 1941 to April 1942. Commissioned 27 January 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 1 October 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 27 January 1943. Promoted Squadron Leader, 27 April 1943. Repatriated 1 May 1944. To No.3 Training Command, 1 August 1944. To No.2 Air Command, 12 August 1945. To Release Centre, 11 September 1945. Retired 12 September 1945. Award presented 15 April 1948. Flew with TCA and Air Canada to 1980. Died at Morin Heights, 31 October 2001. // Squadron Leader Taylor, as pilot and captain of aircraft, has completed numerous operations against the enemy, in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty. // DHH file 181.009 D.1513 (Library and Archives Canada RG.24 Vol.20600) has original recommendation by the Commanding Officer, No.420 Squadron drafted 8 May 1944 when he had flown one tour and completed seven sorties on a second tour. No sortie list but text as follows: // Acting Squadron Leader Taylor through skilful tactics was able to make good his escape from enemy territory. He showed good initiative and endurance and made use of every opportunity afforded him. His courage and determination with careful planning enabled him to reach safety under very trying conditions. It is strongly recommended that he be awarded the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // NOTE: In January 1997 the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch) presented to the National Aviation Museum a "dossier" (actually more like an album) with extended autobiographical notes on members (catalogued in the museum as D.805 C3 L96 1995 NMM). This included much information on F.V. Taylor, who was shot down by a night fighter on the night of 14 April 1943 but evaded capture. // Public Record Office WO 208/3318 had MI.9 report of evasion based on interviews of 25 February 1944. He had left Gibraltar on 23 February 1944, arriving at Whitchurch on 24 February 1944. He did not know the other members of his crew, having been on the squadron only three days when shot down and this had been his first trip with a new crew. // I was pilot of a Wellington Mark X aircraft which took off from Middleton St. George on 14 April 1943 for Karlsruhre. On the return flight we were attacked by a Ju.88 and the aircraft was set on fire. I gave the order to bale out about 0230 hours (15 April). // I came down in the vicinity of Villers (NW Europe 1:250,000, Sheet 5, N 9640). I buried my parachute, harness and Mae West, and put a brown sweater over the blouse of my battle dress. I started walking southeast. At daylight, when I had covered about five miles, I dug a hole on the top of a hill with my knife and stayed there for a day. I heard people around, but was not discovered. At dusk I walked southwest and forded the river Oise, reaching the Canal del’ Oise to the south side of which I crossed at a set of locks. About dawn (16 April) I had reached the vicinity of Sery (N 8939) where I sheltered in a small lean-to in the fields. I started walking again at night, and about midnight reached Anguilcourt (N 8930). I called over two small boys in the street and told them who I was. They took me to their home at a farm in the village, where I was given a meal and a map from the back of a postal calendar. I slept in a barn at the farm till two hours before dawn, when I moved to a wood nearby, where I remained all day (17 April). // At night I left the woods and went through Le Fere (N 8527) to Charmes (N 8626). At a level crossing I spoke to a railway worker. After I had told him who I was, he took me to a small signal box. He told another railway official about me and was allowed to go early off duty so as to take me to his home before dawn. Before I left in the evening he gave me a razor and an old satchel with food. I was still in uniform. // That night (18 April) I walked through Gobain (N 8817) and then got into the hills in that district. In the morning (19 April) I met a man who had spent two years as a conscript worker in Germany. He took me to his home, probably Fresnes (N 8515) where I remained till evening - although he wanted me to stay longer. In the evening I continued through Soissons (Sheet 8, S 89). Just at dawn (20 April) I went to two houses in the town, but the people did not appear to speak French and I got the impression they were Dutch. I then went to a dairy farm , where I was taken in and sheltered for four days (till 23 April). My host gave me his own identity card, saying that he could get another by reporting his as lost, and a jacket, shirt and tie. // On 23 April my host took me by taxi to Laon (O 01) and bought me a ticket for Dijon (France, 1:250,000, Sheet 17, O 06). I made the journey alone. I left Dijon immediately, intending to walk to Dole. I got a meal at a peasant’s house just outside Dijon and continued walking. I then met a farmer, who took me to his home, which was probably at Izier (Sheet 23, O 1657), and kept me till the next night. // On the night of 24 April I went through Genlis (O 1853) and Auxonne (O 3148). I slept in a swamp till dawn, when I went to a farm, where I was allowed to spend the day in a barn. At night (25 April) I walked to Dole (O3937) arriving about 2300 hours, which was after curfew. I lost my way near the river. A German patrol came down the street, but I walked straight towards them and, although they shone a torch in my face, they did not stop me, probably taking me for a French worker because of my satchel and the bottle of milk I was carrying. After this I stopped a girl and a youth on bicycles. They could not understand me, and finally the girl said, “Would you like to talk English ?” I told her who I was and that I was making for Spain. She and the youth took me to the home of the boy’s uncle. // I stayed the night at this house and next day was moved to the girl’s flat. On 27 April I met the man who was to take me to Switzerland. Neither he nor my other helpers were in an organisation, and they said it would be impossible for me to get to Spain. My guide gave me a new identity card and took me to stay at his own house. // On 28 April my guide took me by train to Pontarlier ((P 619) and thence by bus to Les Hopiteaux Vieux ((P 806). I spent the night in a hotel. Next day (29 April) my guide walked with me to a point near the frontier, which I crossed alone near Auberson (O 1309). Just after recrossing the frontier I was arrested by a Swiss soldier. He hande me over to the police who took me to Ste. Croix (O 1711) and Lausanne (30 April). After a few days I was handed over to the British Legation. I was interrogated by a Swiss air force officer over radio location and aerodromes, but I did not answer his questions and he did not press them. // I remained in Switzerland till 8 January 1944.
TAYLOR, Frank Edward Flight Lieutenant, Station Pennfield Ridge, J21995 Air Force Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLER, F/L Frank Edward (J21995) - Air Force Cross - Station Pennfield Ridge - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born 30 July 1917. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 3 January 1942. To No.1 Manning Depot, 11 January 1942. To No.1 BGS, 14 February 1942 (guard duty). To No.6 ITS, 11 April 1942; graduated and promoted LAC, 5 June 1942 but not posted to No.20 EFTS until 20 June 1942; graduated 29 August 1942 when posted to No.5 SFTS; graduated and commissioned, 18 December 1942; to No.1 Flying Instructor School, 8 January 1943. To No.16 SFTS, 7 March 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 18 June 1943. To No.1 Flying Instructor School, 19 August 1943. To No.164 Transport Squadron, 18 June 1944. To Communications Squadron, 10 July 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 December 1944. To Release Centre, 4 September 1945. Retired 13 September 1945. Decoration presented 22 January 1948. Living in Toronto, 1950. As of award he had flown 2,246 hours, of which 2,100 were as instructor, 365 hours in previous six months. This officer has been a flying instructor in Transport Conversion Squadron since its inception at this unit. He is a keen, conscientious officer and pilot. His air work has been exemplary and his special work and tests on weight and balance will add greatly to the safety of transport flying in the service.
TAYLOR, George William Corporal, No.97 Squadron, R100327 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Corporal George William (R100327) - Mention in Despatches - No.97 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Born 11 September 1913; enlisted in Winnipeg, 7 April 1941; began as radio mechanic; remustered to Radar Mechanic, 22 May 1942. Posted overseas February 1942; repatriated 21 August 1945; released 5 October 1945.
TAYLOR, Harold Alan Sergeant, No.57 Squadron, R60723 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Sergeant Harold Alan (R60723) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.57 Squadron - Award effective 15 November 1941 as per London Gazette dated 21 November 1941 and AFRO 1463/41 dated 5 December 1941. Born in Halkirk, Alberta, 1919; home there (clerk); enlisted in Edmonton, 4 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.2 BGS (graduated 9 December 1940) and No.1 ANS. Award presented at Buckingham Palace, 5 May 1942. This airman has participated in attacks on Rotterdam, Bremen, Kiel, Hamburg, Berlin, Cologne and Brest. By hard work and great determination he has reached an extremely high standard as a navigator. He has always shown real coolness and perseverance in his bomb aiming, sometimes spending forty minutes over his target in the face of fierce enemy opposition before dropping his bombs. He has set a very high standard of courage, ability and enthusiasm.
TAYLOR, James Edgar Flying Officer, No.419 Squadron, J27472 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O James Edgar (J27472) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 21 September 1911 in Shebo, Saskatchewan; home in Fillmore, Saskatchewan (clerk); enlisted in Montreal, 8 June 1942. To No.5 Manning Depot, 1 July 1942. To No.7 SFTS (non-flying duty), 17 August 1942. To No.1 ITS, 24 October 1942; promoted LAC, 30 December 1942; to No.5 AOS, 6 February 1943; graduated and commissioned on 25 June 1943. To “Y” Depot, 9 July 1943. To United Kingdom, 15 July 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 25 December 1943. Repatriated 14 August 1945. To Lachine, 21 August 1945. Released 4 December 1945. RCAF photo PL-41577 (ex UK-18421 dated 22 January 1945) taken on the occasion of his marriage to Lieutenant Dietician Myrtle I. Sharp (Prince Albert, Saskatchewan). Award presented 6 September 1947. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 7 October 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (158 hours), 22 May to 25 September 1944. // Flying Officer Taylor has maintained an exceptionally high standard of determination, skill and navigational efficiency on a large number of operational sorties to the enemy's most heavily defended targets. // On the night of May 24th, 1944, when attacking Aachen, Flying Officer Taylor found that his compass had veered over forty degrees for some little time. By his speed and accurate reactions to the situation, he put his aircraft back on track by the best possible means and so reduced materially the danger of his aircraft and crew. // He has invariably shown great resource in maintaining a high degree of accuracy in the navigation of his heavy bomber and his enthusiasm and devotion to duty have set a very high example to the remainder of his crew and to the squadron as a whole. // I consider the undoubted courage and enthusiasm that this officer has shown to attack the enemy fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // The sortie list was as follows: // 22 May 1944 - Dortmund (5.05) // 24 May 1944 - Aachen (5.25) // 27 May 1944 - Bourg Leopold (4.40) // 31 May 1944 - Mount Couple (3.35) // 4 June 1944 - Calais (3.30) // 5 June 1944 - Longue (5.00) // 15 June 1944 - Boulogne (4.20, day) // 16 June 1944 - Sterkrade (5.10) // 21 June 1944 - St. Martin l’Hortier (5.20, day) // 23 June 1944 - Bientiques (3.55) // 24 June 1944 - Bamiers (4.05) // 27 June 1944 - Forey d’Eawy (4.33) // 6 July 1944 - Siracourt (4.20, day) // 12 July 1944 - Thiverny (4.45, day) // 15 July 1944 - Bois Desjardin (4.30) // 18 July 1944 - Caen (4.35, day) // 20 July 1944 - L’Hey (4.00, day) // 1 August 1944 - Acquet (4.30, day) // 3 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (5.05, day) // 4 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (4.55, day) // 5 August 1944 - St. Leu d’Esserent (4.45, day) // 8 August 1944 - Foret de Chantilly (5.25, day) // 9 August 1944 - Pas Acquet de Calais (4.10) // 12 August 1944 - Brunswick (6.20) // 14 August 1944 - Pontigny (4.30, day) // 15 August 1944 - Soesterburg (4.10, day) // 18 August 1944 - Bremen (5.00) // 6 September 1944 - Emden (3.45, day) // 10 September 1944 - Le Havre (5.00, day) // 12 September 1944 - Dortmund (4.45, day) // 14 September 1944 - Wilhelmshaven (3.05, recalled) // 15 September 1944 - Kiel (5.35) // 18 September 1944 - Domburg (5.00, day) // 25 September 1944 - Calais (5.10) // The website “Lost Bombers” describes an incident in his career. Lancaster KB735, No.419 Squadron (VR-O), target Walcheren, 18 September 1944. This aircraft was delivered to No.419 Squadron on 20 May 1944. Known to have flown on operations against Caen (7/8 August 1944) and Stettin (16/17 August 1944), subsequently crashing on return from Walcheren at which time it had a total of 314 hours flying . Airborne 1534 hours from Middleton St.George to bomb gun emplacement near Domburg. Due to adverse weather conditions, the Mosquito target marker aircraft were unable to identify the Aiming Point and the Master Bomber called off the attack. On return, the crew tried to land at East Moor airfield, but over-ran the runway and crashed at 2036. No injuries reported. Crew (mostly RCAF) were F/L W.R.Chalcraft (later awarded DFC), Sergeant J.R.Gunn (RAF), F/O J.E.Taylor (later awarded DFC), F/O C.D. Christian (later awarded DFC), P/O P.E.Bourassa (awarded DFC), Sergeant E.G.Legault and Flight Sergeant H.C.Annable (later awarded DFM).
TAYLOR, James Ernest Flying Officer, No.226 Squadron, J36611 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O James Ernest (J36611) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.226 Squadron - Award effective 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 8 May 1945 and AFRO 966/45 dated 8 June 1945. Home in Athabaska, Alberta; enlisted in Edmonton, 17 February 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.19 EFTS (graduated 31 June 1943) and No.19 SFTS (graduated 15 October 1943). Award presented 9 July 1949. Flying Officer Taylor has throughout numerous sorties proved himself to be an outstanding operational pilot and formation leader. His aircraft has frequently been severely damaged and once he was obliged to make a forced landing. Another time when his aircraft was hit and one engine caught fire Flight Lieutenant Taylor coolly effected a masterly landing. Despite these harassing experiences this officer's enthusiasm has never diminished and his keenness to operate, quiet determination and initiative have been worthy of the highest praise.
TAYLOR, John Dineen Flight Lieutenant, No.404 Squadron, J12337 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/L John Dineen (J12337) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.404 Squadron - Award effective 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 8 May 1945 and AFRO 966/45 dated 8 June 1945. Born in Prince Rupert, British Columbia, 11 December 1920; home in Victoria. Educated at University of British Columbia; enlisted in Vancouver, 2 August 1941 and posted to No.2A Manning Depot. To No.38 SFTS (guard duty), 18 August 1941; to No.4 ITS, 10 October 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 6 December 1941; posted that date to No.18 EFTS; to No.15 SFTS, 28 February 1942; graduated and commissioned 19 June 1942. To No.1 GRS, 3 July 1942. To “Y” Depot, 19 September 1942. To RAF overseas, 2 October 1942. Promoted Flying Officer, 19 December 1942. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 19 June 1944. Repatriated to Canada, 8 September 1945. Released 19 November 1945. Award presented 29 January 1947. RCAF photo PL-28086 (ex UK-8975 dated 18 March 1944) shows him at tail of Beaufighter; describes him as “a former engineering student at the University of British Columbia” and “a recent recruit to the Buffalo squadron.” Died in British Columbia, 29 October 2014. // Since February 1944 this officer has completed a large number of operational sorties, several of which were attacks on the enemy's shipping off the Norwegian and Dutch coasts and in the Bay of Biscay. These attacks were made against heavily defended convoys and in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire from the shore defences and ships and were pressed home with fearless determination. // Public Record Office Air 2/9078 has recommendation drafted by W/C E.W. Pierce, 28 March 1945 when he had flown 48 sorties (198 hours 35 minutes). // Flight Lieutenant Taylor joined this squadron on the 15th of February 1944 and during the past year has completed 198.35 operational hours for 48 sorties, of which no less than ten were anti-shipping strikes on the Norwegian and Dutch coasts and in the Bay of Biscay. The targets have included enemy destroyers, naval auxiliaries, mine sweepers and merchant vessels. His attacks have taken place against heavily defended convoys, defended by balloons, shore-based flak as well as ship-borne flak. On very many occasions he has led this squadron forming part of the strike wing, and has always given the wing leader every confidence and the fullest support. He himself has always pressed home his attacks with fearlessness and the determination to inflict the maximum possible damage to the enemy. // Flight Lieutenant Taylor is one of the most experienced and capable operational pilots on the squadron and I have no hesitation in recommending him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // RCAF Press Release No.6530 dated 12 September 1944 from F/O T. Mosher, transcribed by Huguette Mondor Oates, reads: // The only enemy action encountered during an anti-shipping sweep off Norway this morning by a RAF Coastal Command Beaufighter Wing occurred as the aircraft left their base. Beaufighter “S for Sugar” of the RCAF Buffalo squadron flew into a flock of seagulls while only 10 feet off the runway during the take-off. One bird flew between the propeller blades to clash into the leading edge of the port wing just inboard of the engine nacelle damaging the oil feed line. F/L J.D. Taylor, the captain, of Victoria, B.C., quickly feathered the propeller shutting off that engine, completed the take-off and limped to a neighbouring airfield to make a successful one-engined landing. // F/L Taylor showed great presence of mind in not returning to his own airfield to interrupt the take-off of other aircraft leaving for a sweep. With him as navigator was P/O Stan Paget of St.Catharine’s Ontario.
TAYLOR, John Henry Flight Sergeant, No.415 Squadron, R261435 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, FS John Henry (R261435) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 4 October 1925 in Windsor, Ontario; home there (machine operator). Former member of Royal Canadian Artillery; enlisted Windsor, 1 September 1943 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No18 Pre-Aircrew Education Detachment, 12 October 1943. To No.13 SFTS (non-flying duty), 21 November 1943. To No.9 BGS, 26 November 1943. Promoted LAC on 15 January 1944; graduated and promoted Sergeant on 25 February 1944. To No.3 Aircrew Graduate Training School, 10 March 1944. To “Y” Depot, Halifax, 4 April 1944. Taken on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 24 April 1944. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 25 August 1944. Repatriated to Canada, 18 April 1945. Released 14 June 1945. Award presented 28 May 1947. RCAF photo PL-31214 (ex UK-12842) taken at “Lady McBeth Monument” with Corporal A. Wilbur (Ancaster, Ontario), Sergeant Jack H. Taylor (Windsor) and Sergeant J. Howard McAdam (Ormstown, Quebec). No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2618 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 30 March 1945 when he had completed 37 sorties (225 hours 15 minutes) between 6 October 1944 and 15 March 1945. Flight Sergeant Taylor has participated in many attacks on targets in Germany and enemy occupied territory. He is an outstanding air gunner and such is his vigilance that the crew has been able to proceed with their respective tasks with complete confidence. He invariably displays the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty and his sterling work has been an example to the squadron. The sortie list was as follows: 6 October 1944 - Dortmund (6.15) 12 October 1944 - Wanne Eickel (4.55) 14 October 1944 - Duisburg (5.15) 14 October 1944 - Duisburg (5.35) 23 October 1944 - Essen (6.20) 25 October 1944 - Homburg (5.15) 28 October 1944 - Cologne (5.45) 30 October 1944 - Cologne (3.20) 2 November 1944 - Dusseldorf (5.20) 4 November 1944 - Bochum (5.20) 6 November 1944 - Gelsenkirchen (4.45) 21 November 1944 - Castrop Rauxel (7.15) 27 November 1944 - Neuss (5.40) 30 November 1944 - Duisburg (6.20) 5 December 1944 - Soest (6.45) 6 December 1944 - Osnabruck (6.00) 17 December 1944 - Duisburg (6.30) 24 December 1944 - Dusseldorf (4.25) 28 December 1944 - Opladen (5.50) 13 January 1945 - Saarbrucken (7.00) 14 January 1945 - Osnabruck (6.25) 16 January 1945 - Magdeburg (6.35) 28 January 1945 - Stuttgart (7.10) 1 February 1945 - Mainz (6.35) 2 February 1945 - Wanne Eickel (6.15) 4 February 1945 - Osterfeld-Bonn (5.55) 9 February 1945 - Wanne Eickel (6.10) 13 February 1945 - Bohlen (8.30) 17 February 1945 - Wesel (5.50) 2 March 1945 - Cologne (5.50) 3 March 1945 - Chemnitz (9.10) 7 March 1945 - Hemmingstedt (6.00) 8 March 1945 - Hamburg (6.05) 11 March 1945 - Essen (5.55) 13 March 1945 - Wuppertal (5.40) 14 March 1945 - Zweibrucken (6.40) 15 March 1945 - Castrop Rauxel (6.20)
TAYLOR, Maurice Sidney Flight Lieutenant, Transport Command, J17101 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/L Maurice Sidney (J17101) - Mention in Despatches - Transport Command - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945. Born 27 May 1921. Home in Victoria, British Columbia; enlisted in Regina, Saskatchewan, 16 October 1940. To Technical Training School, St. Thomas, 31 October 1940. To No.1 ITS, 22 December 1940; graduated and promoted LAC on 27 January 1941; posted that date to No.12 EFTS; graduated as 28 March 1941 and posted next day to No.1 Manning Depot; to No.2 SFTS, 6 April 1941; graduated and promoted Sergeant, 21 June 1941. To Embarkation Depot, 22 June 1941; to RAF overseas, 16 July 1941. Commissioned 19 March 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 19 September 1943. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 June 1944. Repatriated 27 November 1944. To No.6 OTU, 14 January 1945. To Release Centre, 29 September 1945. Release date not known. No citation. Died in White Rock, British Columbia, October 2003 as per Legion “Last Post” site. RCAF photo PL-27838 (ex UK-15239 dated 23 September 1944) is captioned as follows: “The limitless desert stretches into the distance, but on the camp there are green garden oases. This is the front lawn of the Officers’ Mess at one of the RAF camps at the edge of the Sind desert in western India. Canadians taking it easy before the lunch gong sounds are, left to right, F/L M.S. ‘Bus’ Taylor (J17101, pilot, Regina), F/O Carey Gunn (J17842, navigator, Medicine Hat), F/O Jack Ferguson (J12822, pilot, Vancouver), and P/O Norm J. McLaughlin (J86819, WOP/AG, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan). Taylor is a flight commander in Ferry Control, allots crews to aircraft to be ferried to all parts of India. Gunn is navigation instructor with a conversion unit; Ferguson is a pilot with Ferry Control; McLaughlin is a veteran of transport command. All are veterans of service in India.” // RCAF Press Release dated 1 September 1, 1944 (from “Crampton) reads as follows: // // The not very exciting but highly-important job of allotting aircrews to deliver to squadrons or other units the hundreds of aircraft of various types that arrive at western India air-gateway is carried out by a veteran Canadian pilot. // Flight Lieutenant M.S. “Bus” Taylor, J17101, 1844 Retallack Street, Regina, who in civvy street was a draughtsman, has been doing this work for a considerable time, longer than he, as an active flying-man, likes to think. // He first came to India in 1942 and went straight to Ferry Control and for a time flew all types of aircraft delivering them all over the country. He was commissioned a year ago and is now a flight commander in charge of allotments at the air-gateway. // This 23 year-old westerner has, however, had some excitement during his four years of overseas service. He went to Malta in 1941 with No. 1 Blenheim Fighter Unit, and was engaged in long-distance day-fighter patrols intercepting the fleets of JU52s which were then flying reinforcements to the Afrika Korps. // In the two months they were on this duty his unit lost more than half their aircraft and crews, even though for days at a time they could not get airborne because of airfield unserviceability after the enemy’s bombing and strafing. “Actually I got few hours flying there,” Taylor laments. When the Blenheims were withdrawn they were replaced by Beaufighters. // Taylor then flew to India, leading a Blenheim convoy. In India, he has flown Liberators, Dakotas, Vultee Vengeance dive-bombers, Harvards, Blenheims, Bislays and even Ansons. // One of his most interesting experiences in India was when he flew a high-ranking air officer to attend the annual durbar in Baluchistan. It was the occasion when the British resident presents the loyal chiefs with bounties for the work done by their tribes in maintaining roads and other public works. “It was,” says Taylor, “one of the most colorful sights I have ever seen”.
TAYLOR, Philip Hamnett Flying Officer, No.619 Squadron, J14909 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Philip Hamnett (J14909) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.619 Squadron - Award effective 19 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 27 June 1944 and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born 1911; home in either Kansas City or Winnipeg; enlisted Winnipeg 23 September 1941. Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 9 October 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 27 November 1948. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation dated 15 March 1944 when he had flown 26 sorties (168 hours eleven minutes). 1 July 43 GARDENING (3.03) 29 Sept 43 Bochum (4.58) 3 July 43 Cologne (5.17) 2 Oct 43 Munich (8.18) 8 July 43 Cologne (5.57) 3 Nov 43 Dusseldorf (4.35) 25 July 43 Essen (4.26) 10 Nov 43 Modane (7.47) 27 July 43 Hamburg (5.35) 18 Nov 43 Berlin (8.05) 29 July 43 Hamburg (5.15) 23 Nov 43 Berlin (7.04) 30 July 43 Remscheid (4.57) 1 Jan 44 Berlin (7.59) 9 Aug 43 Mannheim (6.16) 5 Jan 44 Stettin (8.41) 15 Aug 43 Milan (8.35) 20 Jan 44 Berlin (6.59) 22 Aug 43 Leverkusen (4.43) 27 Jan 44 Berlin (8.56) 27 Aug 43 Nuremburg (7.30) 30 Jan 44 Berlin (6.37) 22 Sept 43 Hanover (5.15) 15 Feb 44 Berlin (7.04) 23 Sept 43 Mannheim (6.56) 19 Feb 44 Leipzig (7.23) Flying Officer Taylor has made 26 operational sorties as an Air Gunner. Seven of these sorties have been against Berlin. He has played a very large part in ensuring the success of his crew and by his eagerness and determination has set a very fine example to the flying personnel of the squadron. It is stressed that his alertness and enthusiasm has saved the aircraft in which he has flown on more than one occasion from attack by enemy aircraft.
TAYLOR, Sergeant Ralph Edgar Flight, No.420 Squadron, R98213 Distinguished Flying Medal RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Flight Sergeant Ralph Edgar (R98213) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 10 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born at Broomville (Boonville ?), Indiana, 1916; home there (farm hand); enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 22 November 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 15 July 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 31 August 1941), and No.12 SFTS (graduated 22 November 1941). Award presented at Buckingham Palace, 18 May 1943. Killed in action, 288 May 1943 (Wellington HE294, No.432 Squadron). Name on Runnymede Memorial. Had been commissioned (J18109). One night in February 1943, this airman was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Wilhelmshaven. Although the constant speed unit of one of the propellers became unserviceable early on the outward journey, Flight Sergeant Taylor flew on to the target and bombed it. Shortly afterwards, while [when ?] the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire, trouble developed in the port engine and it went out of control. Flight Sergeant Taylor quickly regained control and a few minutes later, when the bomber was attacked by an enemy fighter, he skilfully evaded its fire and enabled his own rear gunner to deliver a damaging burst. Sometime later the port engine ceased to function but Flight Sergeant Taylor succeeded in flying the damaged aircraft back to this country. He displayed great courage and devotion to duty throughout.
TAYLOR, Richard Winter Pilot Officer, No.161 Squadron, J15535 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, P/O Richard Winter (J15535) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.161 Squadron - Award effective 11 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 26 March 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born in Vancouver, 1920; home in Victoria; enlisted Vancouver, 12 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 October 1940), No.2 BGS (graduated 2 March 1941), No.2 AOS (graduated 19 January 1941) and No.1 CNS (graduated 12 April 1941). Commissioned May 1942. Killed in action 14 March 1943 (Halifax BG245, No.161 Squadron; buried in Germany). DFC and Bar presented to his mother by Governor General, 17 April 1947. This officer has completed a large number of sorties invariably displaying outstanding skill and devotion to duty. The successes achieved reflect the greatest credit on his efforts which are worthy of high praise. TAYLOR, F/O Richard Winter, DFC (J15535) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.161 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 13 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 24 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. This officer has taken part in numerous operational flights including combined operations at St.Nazaire where he participated in a highly successful low level bombing attack. As a navigator he is exceptionally efficient.
TAYLOR, Robert Pinkerton Sergeant, No.427 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO), R66814 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Sergeant Robert Pinkerton (R66814) - Mention in Despatches - No.427 Squadron (No.62 Base in AFRO) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Born in Glasgow, Scotland, 24 February 1915. Home in Verdun, Quebec; enlisted in Montreal, 6 August 1940 as Aero Engine Mechanic. To St. Thomas (Technical Training School), 11 September 1940. Promoted AC1, 18 January 1941. To Central Flying School, Trenton, 22 January 1941. Promoted LAC, 1 October 1941. To “Y” Depot, 11 March 1942. To RAF overseas, 30 April 1942. Promoted Corporal, 1 October 1942. Promoted Sergeant, 22 May 1943. Repatriated by Long Range Aircraft and posted to Debert, 23 July 1945, apparently for Tiger Force. To Release Centre, 1 September 1945. Released 13 September 1945. Died in Langueil (Chambly County), 30 August 1983. DHist file 181.009 D.1729 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has recommendation dated 11 July 1944: // This airman enlisted in August 1940 and was posted overseas to England in May 1942. He has been an Aero Engine Mechanic in this squadron since December 1942 and his work generally has been outstanding. His devotion to duty and loyalty are beyond reproach.
TAYLOR, Samuel Thomas Flight Lieutenant, No.10 (BR) Squadron, J6861 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/L Samuel Thomas (J6861) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 7 July 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date, London Gazette dAted 10 July 1945 and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Home in Sydney, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Halifax, 19 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 March 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941). As of recommendation he has flown 2,480 hours (1,080 operational - 84 sorties) On loan to TCA at time of award. Award delivered by hand, 7 August 1949. No citation in AFRO other than "in recognition of valuable services in the air." Following from DHist files: Flight Lieutenant Taylor has completed a very large number of flying hours over the North Atlantic in his lengthy operational career. He has cheerfully and willingly captained his crew on any mission he has been ordered to perform, and consistently displayed flying skill which has been exemplary to his squadron. The keenness and devotion to duty he has at all times shown have been responsible for the successful completion of may trying flights against the enemy.
TAYLOR, Sander Lochhead Flight Sergeant, Station Sea Island, R74742 Mention in Despatches RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, FS Sander Lochhead (R74742) - Mention in Despatches - Station Sea Island - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 10 October 1940 following five years in RCMP. Postwar he was in RCAF Security Services and was awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 28 October 1953 (Flying Officer). This non-commissioned officer has an outstanding record in the Royal Canadian Air Force. Possessing initiative and high qualities of leadership, he has done great work in building up the morale of all airmen in his section. His investigations have been through and well carried out. His devotion to duty over an extended period has been of a high order.
TAYLOR, Thomas Wissell Flying Officer, No.426 Squadron, J24251 Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Thomas Wissell (J24251) - Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm (deceased) - Awarded 17 July 1948 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 455/48 dated 23 July 1948. Navigator, killed in action with No.426 Squadron, 12/13 May 1944. Buried in Belgium.
TAYLOR, William Edward Squadron Leader, No.16 SFTS, C22924 Air Force Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, S/L William Edward (C22924) - Air Force Cross - No.16 SFTS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Copper Cliff, Ontario, 18 September 1912; educated there and Sudbury. Employed by International Nickle before war; home in Sudbury, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 17 December 1940. Award presented 27 January 1946. Governor General's Records (RG.7 Group 26 Volume 59, file 190-I, dossier 7) has citation; when recommended he had flown 2,495 hours, 2,215 as instructor, 158 in previous six months. This officer has completed more than three years as an elementary instructor and the exceptional devotion to duty which he showed played a large part in the success of that elementary school. Since assuming his duties in service flying training he has continued to demonstrate the same energy and ability that has characterized his work all the way through. His contribution to the success of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan is worthy of high praise.
TAYLOR, William John Flying Officer, No.426 Squadron, J85567 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O William John (J85567) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 1920 in London, Ontario; home there; enlisted there 13 February 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 9 October 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 22 January 1943) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 11 June 1943). Commissioned 1944. Posted to No.426 Squadron from No.61 Base, 14 May 1944; to "R" Depot, 3 November 1944. Award sent by registered mail 30 March 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.4431 (RG.24 Vol.20649) has recommendation dated 16 October 1944 when he had flown 35 sorties (157 hours 20 minutes), 19 May to 26 September 1944. Flying Officer Taylor has completed 35 sorties over enemy territory, several of which have been over the most heavily defended areas of Hamburg, Kiel, and Metz. During all these trips this pilot has shown great determination in pressing home his attacks. He is a fine captain whose keenness and ability have been a source of inspiration to all his crew. He is strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).
TAYLOR, Winnifred May Wg/O, AFHQ, V30031 Member, Order of the British Empire RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, Wg/O Winnifred May (V30031) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Born in 30 October 1909 in Montreal; educated in Toronto. Employed by Canada Wire and Cable Company, 1927-28, then with Lever Brothers, 1928-41, rising to be in charge of Order Department. Enlisted there 23 October 1941 in Administration Branch. To Canadian Women’s Air Training Depot on enlistment. Commissioned 1 December 1941. Promoted Section Officer, 1 Jun 1942. Promoted Flight Officer, 1 July 1942. Promoted Squadron Officer, 20 November 1942 (first woman CO of an RCAF unit). To No.7 Manning Depot, 18 March 1943. To No.1 Training Command, 31 March 1944. To AFHQ, 12 September 1944 as Senior Staff Officer, WD; continued in that role until WDs disbanded,. Promoted Wing Officer, 1 October 1944. Retired 10 November 1946. Award presented 1 December 1948. Employed by Canada Customs after the war but was brought back to RCAF briefly in 1954 for consultative duties. Died September 1972. Wing Officer Taylor was among the first Royal Canadian Air Force Women's Division officers appointed. Her work from the very first was outstanding and as a result she was later assigned to increasingly responsible positions, first as Officer Commanding Training Wing, No.6 Manning Depot (WD), Toronto, the Commanding Officer No.6 Manning Depot (WD), after which she became Commanding Officer of No.7 Manning Depot (WD), Rockcliffe. In these important appointments she displayed outstanding administrative ability, coupled with loyalty and devotion to duty of a high order. By her example, initiative and leadership she created a very high standard of initial training of airwomen, the great majority of whom passed through her hands. This officer is now the Senior Women's Division Staff Officer, and through her character and personality has continued to exercise a tremendous influence for good among the airwomen. It is considered that the splendid Service attitude and discipline of thousands of airwomen are in large measure a result of Wing Officer Taylor's example and effort.
TAYLOR, Kenneth Garth Squadron Leader, No.1 General Reconnaissance School, 41331 Air Force Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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TAYLOR, S/L Kenneth Garth (RAF 41331) - Air Force Cross - No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Summerside, Prince Edward Island - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Canadian serving in the RAF; from Port Elgin, New Brunswick; enlisted August 1938. Later flew Beaufighters in No.254 Squadron and Hudsons in No.233 Squadron. When recommended he had flown 2,381 hours total, 1,330 hours as instructor, 142 hours in previous six months. Transferred to RCAF (C49078). This officer, who has had an extensive career in operational and instructional flying, has displayed energy, efficiency and organizing ability far above the ordinary course of duty. As officer commanding a flying squadron, he has proven himself to be a capable and efficient leader. The consistently high record of flying hours with no casualties maintained at this unit are largely due to this officer's capable supervision.
TAYLOR, Carroll Alfred Captain, No.427 Squadron, O-885989 USAAF Distinguished Flying Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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TAYLOR, Captain Carroll Alfred (USAAF O-885989) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.427 Squadron - award approved 13 July 1944 but not published in London Gazette. Citation in DHist file 181.009 D.3051 (National Archives of Canada RG.24 Vol.20634). This captain of aircraft has completed a tour of operational duty throughout which he displayed the utmost vigour and determination. His high personal qualities and fine offensive spirit have inspired great confidence in others with whom he has flown.
TAYLOR, Lionel Patrick Warrant Officer, No.435 Squadron, Aus 426929 Distinguished Flying Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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TAYLOR, Warrant Officer Lionel Patrick (AUS 426929) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.435 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 January 1946. Born 22 December 1922 at Roma, Queensland, Australia; home in Charleville, Queensland; educated at De La Salle Brothers College (Roma) and St.Mary's Convent School (Charleville). Enlisted 15 August 1942 in Brisbane. Commissioned from the ranks, January 1945. Discharged as Flying Officer, 18 January 1946 at No.35 PTC. Air Ministry Bulletin 20772/AL.1109 refers. This Warrant Officer has completed many sorties, flying supplies to the Army in Burma. He successfully accomplished these missions in monsoon weather and in the face of enemy opposition. Warrant Officer Taylor has shown keenness and great devotion to duty, setting a high example to all.
TAYLOR, Richard Cann Pilot Officer, No.426 Squadron, RAF 144711 Distinguished Flying Cross Commonwealth Air Forces WWII
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TAYLOR, P/O Richard Cann (RAF 144711) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.426 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943. Born at Newburn-on-Tyne, Northumberland, 1911; home in Bedlington, Northumberland. Commissioned 1943. Took part as a Sergeant in No.426 Squadron\'s first operation (14 January 1943); at first in C/L C.S. Dowie\'s crew, then with F/O J.B. Millward. Air Ministry Bulletin 11446 refers. ...in numerous bombing sorties on some of the most heavily defended areas in Germany and occupied territory. Also participated in several minelaying operations. February 1943, when aircraft was badly damaged over Hamburg, his coolness and devotion to duty contributed in large measure to successful completion of sortie. NOTE: DHist file 181.009 D.2624 (RG.24 Volume 20628) has recommendation dated 18 July 1943 when he had flown 22 ? sorties (131 hours 50 minutes), 14 January to 29 May 1943. Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. The fine record of achievement held by this officer has, in no small manner, successfully contributed to the operational efficiency of the crew of which he is a member. He has taken part in numerous bombing sorties against some of the most heavily defended areas in Germany and the occupied countries and has participated in several minelaying sorties. After his aircraft has been badly damaged over Hamburg one night in February [3 February 1943] his coolness, cooperation and devotion to duty contributed in a large measure to the successful completion of the sortie. The sortie list (identical to that of F/O John F. Lewis, RCAF) was as follows: 14 January 1943 - Lorient (5.31) 15 January 1943 - Lorient (5.00) 3 February 1943 - Hamburg (6.15) 7 February 1943 - Lorient (6.35) 12 February 1943 - Gardening (5.00) 13 February 1943 - Lorient (6.50) 16 February 1943 - Lorient (6.50) 18 February 1943 - Gardening (3.55) 24 February 1943 - Wilhelmshaven (4.15) 26 February 1943 - Cologne (6.15) 3 March 1943 - Hamburg (6.15) 5 March 1943 - Essen (5.30) 4 April 1943 - Kiel (6.45) 8 April 1943 - Duisburg (5.25) 11 April 1943 - Gardening (3.25) 14 April 1943 - Stuttgart (7.45) 16 April 1943 - Mannheim (7.20) 27 April 1943 - Gardening (6.25) 4 May 1943 - Dortmund (4.35) 13 May 1943 - Bochum (5.20, landed Coltishall) 23 May 1943 - Air-Sea Rescue (5.55, counted as one-half sortie) 25 May 1943 - Dusseldorf (5.05) 29 May 1943 - Wuppertal (5.39) Note: For two Combat Reports bearing on his career (22 March 1944 and 24 March 1944) see entry for N.M. Coull.
TAYLOR, Elmer Franklin Flying Officer, No.428 Squadron, C19526 Distinguished Flying Cross RCAF Personnel Awards 1939-1949
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TAYLOR, F/O Elmer Franklin (C19526) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 20 October 1916 in Nesbitt, Manitoba; educatedin Minnewawa; home in Arcola, Saskatchewan (farm hand and mechanic); enlisted in Calgary, 16 August 1941 as Aero Engine Mechanic. Posted to No.1 Manning Depot on enlistment. To Technical Training School, 12 September 1941. Promoted AC1, 19 January 1942. To No.10 SFTS, 21 January 1942. To “Y” Depot, 12 March 1942. Promoted LAC, 19 April 1942. To RAF overseas, 30 April 1942. Disembarked in Britain, 13 May 1942. To No.3063 Echelon, 11 June 1942. To No.409 Squadron, 7 December 1942. To No.4 School of Technical Training, 2 June 1943. Promoted Sergeant, 26 July 1943 on remuster to aircrew. To No.1666 Conversion Unit, 31 July 1943. To No.428 Squadron, 26 August 1943. Commissioned 17 December 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 17 June 1944. To No.1659 Conversion Unit, 21 August 1944. Repatriated 18 June 1945; to Debert, 19 June 1945; retired 16 September 1945. Died in Trail, British Columbia, 6 August 1997. Award sent by registered mail 11 July 1950. No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 2 September 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (221 hours 55 minutes), 30 June 1943 to 3 August 1944. This is odd pattern - one sortie on 30 June 1943 (Munchen-Gladbach) and the next one 5 September 1943. Mannheim incident described may have been either 5 September 1943 or 18 November 1943. // As Flight Engineer, Flying Officer Taylor has completed one tour of operations having made thirty-two attacks against the enemy to twenty-seven different targets. He has attacked Berlin four times, Leipzig twice, Hamburg, Kassel, Frankfurt and many other targets in Germany and France. He performed his duties so well that his aircraft reached the target on every sortie with no technical failures and always returned on four engines. On one occasion, just after the bombs were released on Mannheim, only very quick action prevented the failure of one engine through over-heating. He quickly closed the radiator shutters allowing the lubricant to warm up and flow freely, even though the oil temperature gauge was already reading excessively hot. His keenness, above average ability, and crew co-operation made him an ideal member of his crew, and on occasions he have invaluable aid to both the navigator and gunners. // For the completion of an extremely satisfactory tour of operations, for the efforts he put forth in converting crews to a new type of aircraft and for strong support of the squadron at all times, I recommend the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross. // The sortie list was as follows: // 30 June 1943 - Munchen-Gladbach (6.40) // 31 August 1943 - Berlin (8.00) // 5 September 1943- Mannheim (8.10) // 15 September 1943- Mont Lucon (7.25) // 16 September 1943- Modane (8.50) // 8 October 1943 - Hanover (5.20) // 22 October 1943 - Kassel (8.00) // 3 November 1943 - Dusseldorf (6.45) // 11 November 1943 - Cannes (10.30) // 18 November 1943 - Mannheim (8.05) // 19 November 1943 - Leverkusen (6.50) // 22 November 1943 - Berlin (8.10) // 25 November 1943 - Frankfurt (8.15) // 3 December 1943 - Leipzig (8.20) // 4 January 1944 - Gardening (5.15) // 20 January 1944 - Berlin (8.15) // 28 January 1944 - Berlin (9.00) // 11 February 1944 - Gardening (5.30) // 19 February 1944 - Leipzig (7.00) // 3 March 1944 - Gardening (7.45) // 6 March 1944 - Trappes (4.50) // 22 March 1944 - Gardening (6.55) // 23 March 1944 - Laon (5.20) // 25 March 1944 - Aulnoye (6.15) // 29 March 1944 - Paris (6.05) // 9 April 1944 - Lille (4.45) // 23 April 1944 - Gardening (6.30) // 21 June 1944 - St. Martin (4.35, day) // 18 July 1944 - Wesseling (5.40) // 24 July 1944 - Stuttgart (6.45) // 28 July 1944 - Hamburg (5.00) // 3 August 1944 - Bois de Casson (6.00, day) // Notes: Application for Operational Wing dated 28 August 1944 states he had flown 32 sorties (226 hours ten minutes), 30 August 1943 to 3 August 1944.
TAYLOR, Robin Corporal, HMCS Iroquois , SEE DESCRIPTION Medal of Bravery CF Postwar Aviation Services
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TAYLOR, Robin, Corporal - Medal of Bravery - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 13 August 1984. From Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Joint award with Corporal Joseph Sylvain Bruno Ross. // On 4-5 December 1983, Cpl. Sylvain Ross and Cpl. Robin Taylor, aircraft technicians on H.M.C.S. Iroquois displayed considerable daring and professionalism in readying the flight deck for the rescue of eleven seamen from the disabled No. 5 Ho Ming, floundering off the coast of Newfoundland. The critical listing of the Ho Ming made it imperative to reach the men as soon as possible. Preparing the first helicopter launch, in ten-metre swells and winds of 110 km/hour, Cpls. Ross and Taylor directed the move of the aircraft from the hangar to the flight deck. The deck motion was so they laboured at the edge of the heaving deck while controlling the unfolding of the rotor blades. During this dangerous operation, Cpl. Ross was almost swept away to sea when a gust of wind lifted him and he found himself hanging precariously from a rotor blade. The launch was successful but the helicopter returned two and a half hours later after a postponed rescue attempt. At great risk to their own safety, Cpls. Ross and Taylor secured the aircraft on the deck in the dark. Just before daybreak the Iroquois answered a second SOS from the Ho Ming. Drenched with freezing spray in the cold morning air, Cpls. Ross and Taylor worked just as diligently and effectively at the two subsequent launches and recoveries of the helicopter, which brought eleven survivors to Iroquois.